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  #1  
Old 26 May 2007, 04:52 PM
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Blow Your Top Don't store potatoes with onions

Comment: It is widely reported that storing potatoes and onions together
can make both spoil. Then I ran across this link that categorically
states that this is untrue:
http://www.extension.umn.edu/yardand...h247onion.html

What gives?
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  #2  
Old 26 May 2007, 06:24 PM
Doug4.7
 
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So who ya goin to believe? An extension service (run by a university) or some city slickers from California?
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  #3  
Old 28 May 2007, 06:26 PM
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Wouldn't the potatoes absorbed the onion smell, and possibly flavor. So why store them togather anyways. I perfer my potatoes not tasting like an onion.
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Old 28 May 2007, 08:00 PM
Singing in the Drizzle Singing in the Drizzle is offline
 
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I would think that the onion moisture content would make the patatoes rot much quicker.
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  #5  
Old 30 May 2007, 10:03 PM
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This thread is makeing me hungery. I like potatoes and onions together. mmmmmmmm potatoe and onion soup. yum.
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  #6  
Old 30 May 2007, 10:50 PM
sweetokiegirl sweetokiegirl is offline
 
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Well the link says that they will make them sprout not spoil. Two different things. I learned the hard way that storing potatoes and onions together, like in a dark drawer, made them spoil. Now I store my onions hanging from a hook so that the air can circulate. If they sit on the counter, they go bad faster. My potatoes are on the counter where I can see them and will remember to use them. I would forget them in the drawer and buy new ones before I realized I had older ones. By then they would be no good. They keep the same amount of time in the drawer or on the counter. But when stored with onions, they become mush and so do the onions. yech

Something related to this is that you shouldn't store your carrots with fruits (like in the same crisper bin in the fridge) as the ethylene the fruits put off will make your carrots taste bitter. Learned that the hard way also.

Last edited by sweetokiegirl; 30 May 2007 at 10:53 PM. Reason: forgot something.
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  #7  
Old 30 May 2007, 11:44 PM
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Hello Kitty

Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetokiegirl View Post
Well the link says that they will make them sprout not spoil. Two different things. I learned the hard way that storing potatoes and onions together, like in a dark drawer, made them spoil. Now I store my onions hanging from a hook so that the air can circulate. If they sit on the counter, they go bad faster. My potatoes are on the counter where I can see them and will remember to use them. I would forget them in the drawer and buy new ones before I realized I had older ones. By then they would be no good. They keep the same amount of time in the drawer or on the counter. But when stored with onions, they become mush and so do the onions. yech
Very odd. I have always kept the spuds and the onions in the same drawer in the fridge, and I have never had a spoilage or sprouting problem with either.

When I keep my onions out of the fridge, they sprout.

Four Kitties
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  #8  
Old 30 May 2007, 11:59 PM
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[hijack] I have always been slightly puzzled by the chill-chain. This is the idea that in the distribution system fruit and veg should be kept permanantly refrigerated. It leaves the field or orchard, is pre-cooled, put into a refrigerated warehouse, then put on a refrigerated truck, sent to another warehouse, put on another refrigrated truck, sent to a distribution centre, then put on another refrigerated truck and delivered to the supermarket. The idea is that the chill-chain should never be broken. Fair enough.

Then what do the supermarkets do? Put it on un-refrigerated shelves.

Also what's the deal with eggs? They are never refrigerated at any point in the distribution process, yet what's the first thing you are supposed to do with eggs once you get them home? Put them in the fridge. [/hijack]
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  #9  
Old 31 May 2007, 01:48 AM
blucanary blucanary is offline
 
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Eggs are shipped and sold cold here. I would assume keeping the veggies cold in shipping keeps them closer to fresh picked. Though I would imagine it would make the tomatoes mealy. yuck.
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Old 31 May 2007, 01:56 AM
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Nope tomatoes are chilled - nut not as much as as top and stone. Top and stone are typically stored at 1 degree celcius, tomatoes (and for that matter onions, potatoes and most veg/salad) at 7-8 deg celcious.
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Old 31 May 2007, 03:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddylizard View Post
Also what's the deal with eggs? They are never refrigerated at any point in the distribution process, yet what's the first thing you are supposed to do with eggs once you get them home? Put them in the fridge. [/hijack]
I didn't know that. I've never kept my eggs in the fridge. For what it's worth, they never sploiled either.
It does explain the egg shelf in the fridge door, that i always found useless.

Last edited by Whaler on the Moon; 31 May 2007 at 03:53 PM. Reason: Quote wasn't showing.
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  #12  
Old 31 May 2007, 04:07 PM
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Eggs can be stored at room temp, but they won't keep as long as when refrigerated.

Tomatoes (especially the made-for-market hybrids) may be shipped chilled, but they're always sold at room temp.

What the heck are "top and stone?" (I'm guessing some sort of rhyming slang, but maybe I'm just an idiot.) I've never come across this phrase before.
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  #13  
Old 31 May 2007, 04:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by musicgeek View Post
Eggs can be stored at room temp, but they won't keep as long as when refrigerated.

Tomatoes (especially the made-for-market hybrids) may be shipped chilled, but they're always sold at room temp.

What the heck are "top and stone?" (I'm guessing some sort of rhyming slang, but maybe I'm just an idiot.) I've never come across this phrase before.
Top fruit are apples and pears. Lord only knows where this term derives from, but it is industry wide.

Stone fruits are fruits that have a stone. Peaches, nectarines, apricots, plums and cherries.

ETA Yes "apples and pears" is some sort of rhyming slang, but not relevant in this case.

Last edited by Eddylizard; 31 May 2007 at 04:58 PM.
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  #14  
Old 31 May 2007, 05:10 PM
Gayle Gayle is offline
 
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Ethylene gas is found primarily in apples and pears. Produce companies often "gas" bananas with ehtylene to advance their ripening. You can do that at home by placing your green bananas in a paper bag with an apple.

When fruits and vegetables are in the field, they are still connected to their source of food or production. (it's mighty warm in a cow's udder, but you don't leave your milk out on the counter) As soon as you pick them, they begin to rot. (Ripening is part of the rotting process, if you think about it). Refrigeration is used in transportation of almost all fruits and vegetables in the US since it is the easiest way to retard rot in almost all foods. Once things reach their destination, they are sorted into bins that provide the appropriate amount of refrigeration for that type of food. Your leafy vegetables like lettuces and greens are thin and will rot the fastest: refrigerate them carefully so they don't freeze, but stay crisp. Mushrooms need to stay cool or they will rot fast. Cruciferous vegetables are right up there, too. Root vegetables don't need as much refrigeration; their solid thick construction will hold out well at room temperature (but get rid of those leafy tops cause they'll draw bugs fast). If you think about it, fruit that can grow in colder weather can stand to be unrefrigerated longer: citrus, apples, pears can sit out on the counter for a day or two. Berries and melons will rot fast at room temperature. Of course, the biggest thing is the climate where you live. Here where it's hot and humid, I refrigerate all my produce until the day I'm going to eat it. I let them get to room temperature before I eat them, though. The flavor is better.
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  #15  
Old 31 May 2007, 05:14 PM
sweetokiegirl sweetokiegirl is offline
 
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Refrigeration slows the ripening process of fruits. I believe they produce less ethylene gas, the gas that ripens fruits, under refrigeration. It is still produced, hence why carrots will turn bitter, but not as much. We would often have oranges and apples go bad sitting on the counter, but not in the fridge for the same amount of time. One bad apple can spoil a whole barrel because it is emmiting large amounts of ethylene gas. Grocery stores usually go through the produce daily to remove riper fruit so they don't spoil those around them.

Maybe my potato/onion experience isn't the norm, but I don't store them in the fridge either. If I had a bigger fridge, I'd consider doing it.

Edited to add: Thanks Gayle, I just can't post fast enough.
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  #16  
Old 10 February 2010, 12:39 AM
naturalthrift
 
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Default Other bad storage options for potatoes

I set a bag of potatoes in the pantry next to a bag of grapefruit and a bag of oranges. A few days later, my potatoes were not only slimy, but the bottom of the bag was nothing but liquified mush.

I should probably say, "I'll never do that again," but actually I am: I just put a potato and an orange in a mixing bowl to see if citrus fruits really do emanate death rays when forced to room with potatoes.

Tanya Caylor
http://www.naturalthrift.blogspot.com/
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  #17  
Old 22 February 2010, 11:59 AM
naturalthrift
 
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Default Citrus-potato storage experiment results

Itís been 12 days now and the test potato looks fine. In fact, Iíll probably use it in a soup tomorrow night. So it doesn't look like I can blame the citrus fruits for sliming my potatoes.
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