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  #1  
Old 18 April 2012, 10:01 PM
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Cowboy They Sold Trigger

THE END OF AN ERA.......

The Roy Rogers Museum in Branson, MO has closed its doors forever.
The contents of the museum were sold at a public auction.
Roy Rogers told his son, if the museum ever operates at a loss, close it
And sell the contents. He complied.

Note the follow-on article truly the end of an era.
Here is a partial listing of some of the items that were sold at auction...

Roy 's 1964 Bonneville sold for $254,500, it was estimated to
Sell between 100 and 150 thousand dollars.

His script book from the January 14,1953 episode of This Is Your Life sold for $10,000 (EST. $800-$1,000).

A collection of signed baseballs (Pete Rose, Duke Snyder and other greats) sold for $3,750.

A collection of signed bats (Yogi Berra, Enos Slaughter, Bob Feller, and others) sold for $2,750.

Trigger's saddle and bridle sold for $386,500 (EST. 100-150 K).

One of many of Roy 's shirts sold for $16,250 and one of his many cowboy hats sold for $17,500.

One set of boot spurs sold for $10,625. (He never used a set of spurs on Trigger).

A life size shooting gallery sold for $27,500.

Various chandeliers sold from $6,875 to $20,000. Very unique and artistic in their western style.

signed photograph by Don Larsen taken during his perfect game in the world series against
The Dodgers on Oct. 8, 1953, along with a signed baseball to Roy from Don, sold for $2,500.

Two fabulous limited edition BB guns in their original boxes with
Numerous photos of Roy, Dale, Gabby, and Pat sold for $3,750.

A collection of memorabilia from his shows entertaining the troops in Vietnam sold for $938.
I never knew he was there. His flight jacket sold for $7,500.

His set of dinner ware plates and silverware sold for $11,875.
The Bible they used at the dinner table every night sold for $8,750.

One of several of his guitars sold for $27,500.

Nellybelle sold for $116,500.

A fabulous painting of Roy, Dale, Pat, Buttermilk, Trigger, and Bullet sold for $10,625.

One of several sets of movie posters sold for $18,750.

A black and white photograph of Gene Autry with a touching inscription
From Gene to Roy sold for $17,500.

A Republic Productions Poster bearing many autographs of the
People that played in Roy 's movies sold for $11,875.

Dale's horse, Buttermilk (whose history is very interesting) sold below
The presale estimate for $25,000. (EST. 30-40 K).

Bullet sold for $35,000 (EST. 10-15 K). He was their real pet.

Dale's parade saddle, estimated to sell between 20-30 K, sold for $104,500.

One of many pairs of Roy 's boots sold for $21,250.

Trigger sold for $266,500.

Do you remember the 1938 movie The Adventures of Robinhood,
With Errol Flynn and Olivia de Havilland? Well Olivia rode Trigger in that movie.

Trigger was bred on a farm co-owned by Bing Crosby.
Roy bought Trigger on a time payment plan for $2,500.
Roy and Trigger made 188 movies together.
Trigger even out did Bob Hope by winning an Oscar in the movie Son of Paleface in 1953.

It is extremely sad to see this era lost forever. Despite the fact that Gene and Roy 's movies,
As well as those of other great characters, can be bought or rented for viewing,
today's kids would rather spend their time playing video games.
Today it takes a very special pair of parents to raise their kids with the right values and morals.
These were the great heroes of our childhood, and they did teach us right from
Wrong, and how to have and show respect for each other and the animals that share this earth.

You and I were born at the right time.
We were able to grow up with these great people even if we never met them.
In their own way they taught us patriotism and honor, we learned that lying and
Cheating were bad, and sex wasn't as important as love.
We learned how to suffer through disappointment and failure and work through it. Our lives were drug free.

So it's good-bye to Roy and Dale, Gene and Hoppy, The Lone Ranger and Tonto.
Farewell to Sky King and Superman and Sgt. Friday. Thanks to Capt.. Kangaroo,
Mr. Rogers and Capt. Noah and all those people whose lives touched ours, and made them better.



It was a great ride through childhood.

HAPPY TRAILS MY FRIENDS
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  #2  
Old 18 April 2012, 10:02 PM
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Cowboy Oh brother.....

I was OK enough with this, being something of a history and trivia buff, until I got to the (apparently required) finger wagging lecture at the end telling us what great people boomers are, and what a bunch of lazy video game playing worthless bums today's kids are.

Quote:
You and I were born at the right time.
We were able to grow up with these great people even if we never met them.
In their own way they taught us patriotism and honor, we learned that lying and
Cheating were bad, and sex wasn't as important as love.
We learned how to suffer through disappointment and failure and work through it. Our lives were drug free.
What a magnificent load of self serving sanctimonious bullNFBSK! "Our lives were drug free?" Seriously? What planet did this person come from? There wasn't a vice or drug out there that the average baby boomer didn't try at least once.
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  #3  
Old 18 April 2012, 10:14 PM
Gayle Gayle is offline
 
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Not me! I had Icky Twerp; the man who brought back the Three Stooges!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2AphUcsSNdk
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tz5EoRtzJNk
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H_N9h...02341752F46148

I learned that a man with a small hat and three guys in gorilla suits beat the socks off of Captain Kangaroo and Mr. Bunny Rabbit. Long live Icky, Ajax, Arkadelphia, and Delphenium.
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  #4  
Old 18 April 2012, 10:33 PM
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Roll eyes

Quote:
Despite the fact that Gene and Roy 's movies, as well as those of other great characters, can be bought or rented for viewing, today's kids would rather spend their time playing video games.
Yes, how virtuous those kids of the 1940s and 1950s were, not availing themselves of a form of entertainment that didn't exist.
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  #5  
Old 18 April 2012, 10:43 PM
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Not that they would have even if it were available, you understand. The writer's generation just wouldn't do something like that.

~Psihala
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  #6  
Old 18 April 2012, 10:52 PM
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Weren't those TV shows (or TV in general) the brain rotting vice of that generation? Now they are suddenly virtuous?
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  #7  
Old 18 April 2012, 11:12 PM
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Cowboy

1952 version:

"Despite the fact that the great outdoors offers untold entertainment opportunities for curious and creative young minds, today's children would rather waste their time sitting indoors watching vapid cowboy shows on television."
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  #8  
Old 19 April 2012, 12:14 AM
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Canada

"Why today's generation no hunt mammoth? Why they prefer making plants grow? Ugg no understand kids these days..."
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  #9  
Old 19 April 2012, 08:57 AM
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Yeah, the mid-20th century was a real golden age for values in America. Women, who had just proven they could step up and do "men's work" during the war, were ordered back into the kitchen; black people were still second-class citizens nearly a century after the end of slavery (not to mention still being lynched); we were so afraid of the Soviet Union that we started a modern witch-hunt among our own people; and apparently we thought it clever to name a Native American character "Tonto."

Respect for each other? I guess this conversation is just between the good old boys.
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  #10  
Old 19 April 2012, 09:38 AM
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Cowboy

I think I'd be a little, well, concerned if one of our kids gave up playing video games in favor of watching old cowboy movies.

But the weird thing about this is that the cowboy movies themselves are a romanticized (i.e. completely made up) version of a historical period. It's like: "Nostalgia just ain't what it used to be!"
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  #11  
Old 19 April 2012, 12:50 PM
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Quote:
how to have and show respect for each other and the animals that share this earth.
Like hunting animals from helicopters, carrying sick dogs on roof racks and accusing other people of every sin under the sun because they have the job you want....

Now that's respect!
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  #12  
Old 19 April 2012, 06:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ganzfeld View Post
But the weird thing about this is that the cowboy movies themselves are a romanticized (i.e. completely made up) version of a historical period.
Isn't that pretty much what nostalgia is?
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  #13  
Old 19 April 2012, 08:54 PM
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Yes, of course. But the OP is nostalgia about being nostalgic.
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  #14  
Old 20 April 2012, 03:53 AM
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If they are talking about a pre world war II movie I am not sure that it reflects baby boomer values (who were born after world war II) but the value of their parents. So is this from a baby boomer?

But if it is from a baby boomer.

As far as respecting animals go I think more gen x and y are vegatarians and buy cruelity free products and treat their pets better then past generations. Also didn't many baby boomer spend their late teens and twenties telling their parents generation how wrong they got it? You know their parents who were born or were children in world war I, were young in the great depression and then fought and won World War II. And that their respective countries were evil as well for being involved in certain wars.

As for "bad" video games, weren't they wasting their money on pinball machines?

I lilke music and fashion from the 60's and my parents and Aunts and Uncles are boomers but this romantisim of the past gets to me. (My relatives tend not to do it though.)
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  #15  
Old 20 April 2012, 04:07 AM
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Quote:
As for "bad" video games, weren't they wasting their money on pinball machines?
It depended on where one lived and what type of pinball machine it was. In some states within the US, the "free replay" type of pinball machine (as opposed to the "free ball" type) was illegal under their respective gambling laws.

ETA: While this bit of pinball trivia seems well-known amongst pinball buffs, I had to do a little digging to find some sources that weren't blogs, personal web-pages, or fan sites. There is a Popular Mechanics article that mentions it, and an mid-50's Marquette Law Review article (pdf format) giving a somewhat more detailed explanation of the reasoning behind including such machines under gambling laws.

~Psihala

Last edited by Psihala; 20 April 2012 at 04:24 AM.
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  #16  
Old 20 April 2012, 04:32 AM
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I will never cease to be amazed by what an incredible coincidence nostalgia is. The best, the brightest, the greatest of everything just happened to come about when YOU were a kid. You, meaning, whoever is speaking. Wow, that's such an odd coincidence! Who would have thought that the greatest of everything would just magically coincide with what was popular when you were young?

I will freely admit that kids today have a lot more great junk than I had back in the day. Hell no I don't want to romanticize it...I wish I could have had some of that stuff!

This was my favorite game in 1992:


And this gaming now:


And don't get me started on TV shows. I used to watch Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, and I'd scream, over and over again at the TV "Why don't you just NFBSKING kill him!? You have giant swords! Kill someone!" And I wondered why the characters never fall in love, never move the status quo, never die, and never act like real people. Witness any modern kids show, and nearly all of that is corrected.
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Old 20 April 2012, 05:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Amigone201 View Post
I will never cease to be amazed by what an incredible coincidence nostalgia is. The best, the brightest, the greatest of everything just happened to come about when YOU were a kid. You, meaning, whoever is speaking. Wow, that's such an odd coincidence! Who would have thought that the greatest of everything would just magically coincide with what was popular when you were young?
If they are saying it with irony ok but most aren't. I wish the internet in it's current form when I was a teen as I may have had more friends (even if they were on-line ones)

And in my field if work as a library assistant..wow how much easier is it, from having use the old card catelogue (in primary school) to the first computer catelogues (at high school and uni). Even in my fist job in medical research (in the 90's), it took me a week working full-time to do an article search for a Phd student using paper based indexes and I actually had to be in the library to do it (or rather two specialised libraries). And she admitted I found some fantastic articles for her that she wouldn't have the time to find if she had to fit it in around her "bench work".

Now you could problery do it in an afternoon and not have to leave your desk.

Mind you I quite enjoyed that week and it clarified that I did want to work in the library field rather then in Science.
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Old 20 April 2012, 01:04 PM
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Drug free, eh? In the era of "better living through chemistry"? Consider the history:

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The earliest references to the practice of injecting amphetamines (particularly methamphetamine) occurred during the 1950s, but the practice did not spread until the 1960s(1). In 1962 a crackdown on San Francisco pharmacies which sold injectable amphetamines drew national attention to the problem of amphetamine "mainlining." and led to the emergence of underground production facilities referred to as "speed labs"(2). While many of these labs, primarily located on the West Coast, were small "Mom and Pop" operations, the amphetamine trade was historically dominated by outlaw motorcycle groups(3). Amphetamine use began to decline in the 1970s, due to increased public awareness of its dangers, as well as FDA scheduling of the drug(4).
Quote:
In the 1950s, the U.S. military and CIA researched LSD as a possible "truth drug," which could be used for brainwashing or inducing prisoners to talk. However, after military interest in LSD waned in favor of other drugs, the psychiatric community began to research and issue reports on the drug's possible therapeutic capabilities for psychotic, epileptic, and depressed patients.

Non-therapeutic use of LSD increased throughout the late 1950s and 1960s. Among the first groups to use LSD recreationally were research study participants, physicians, psychiatrists, and other mental health professionals who later distributed the drug among their friends. Prior to 1962, LSD was available only on a small scale to those who had connections in the medical field, as all the LSD was produced by Sandoz Laboratories, in Basel Switzerland, and then distributed to health professionals. However, the drug was not difficult to produce in a chemical laboratory. The formula could be purchased for 50 cents from the US patent office, and the LSD itself could be stored inside blotting paper. Soon a black market for LSD in the US emerged.

In 1966 the Grunsky Bill was passed by Congress, which prohibited the possession, manufacturing, sale and importation of LSD. Illegal manufacturing of LSD continued despite the new law, but soon LSD users experienced growing problems with contaminated or adulterated LSD produced by amateur chemists and not of the same quality as that produced by Sandoz..

...use of LSD declined in the 1970s and 1980s...
Quote:
In the 1950s the beatniks appropriated the use of marijuana from the black hepsters and the drug moved into middle-class white America in the 1960s.
Quote:
In the second major wave of American opiate addiction, heroin was integrated into the new cultural identity of the "hipster"(20), first through the Harlem jazz scene in the 1930s and 1940s and then through the Beatnik subculture of the 1950s. During this period the major supply of heroin entering the U.S. came through the "French Connection"--a collaboration between Corsican gangsters in Marseille and the Sicilian Mafia. In April 1971, Congressman Robert Steele (R-CT) investigated reports of rampant heroin abuse among U.S. servicemen in Vietnam. His fact-finding mission estimated an addiction rate of 10 to 15%. This alarming statistic, combined with emerging evidence linking heroin addiction to crime, pushed the heroin problem to the front of Nixon's drug policy agenda.
I think one hears more about drugs today because we know more about why they are bad, not because people didn't discover them until later.

Last edited by Avril; 20 April 2012 at 01:10 PM.
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  #19  
Old 20 April 2012, 08:20 PM
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Also, they weren't illegal and the subject of major news stories involving massive shootouts with authorities or huge international criminal organizations.
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Old 20 April 2012, 10:09 PM
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Ah yes! Castle Wolfenstein 3D! It was loaded on the first 486 computer I owned.
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