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Old 13 March 2011, 01:21 AM
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Icon07 Rapeseed oil --> canola oil

Comment: An unsubstantiated story, but one that I find very believable, is that the
name was changed from "rapeseed oil" to "canola oil" because after the
feminist movement hit in the '60's, no woman was going to cook with
something called "rapeseed". It wouldn't be the first time the name of a
food was changed to appeal more to consumers, although it doesn't *always*
work out as intended.

Garbanzo beans are sometimes marketed as "chickpeas"

For a while, prunes were being sold as "dried plums"

When restaurants weren't selling very much "Patagonian tooth fish", the
name was changed to "Chilean sea bass"

I'm sure there are others, those are just the ones that came quickly to
mind.
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  #2  
Old 13 March 2011, 01:37 AM
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Brad from Georgia Brad from Georgia is offline
 
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Might be onto something. "Monkey dongs" sold much better when they changed the name to "frankfurters."
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  #3  
Old 13 March 2011, 01:59 AM
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brassica_napus

Quote:
"canola" being an acronym for Canadian oil, low acid
The more you know...

ETA: Canola was developed in the 1970s, so has nothing to do with any 60s feminist movement. That doesn't mean you're not going to give it a market friendly name.
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Old 13 March 2011, 03:01 AM
Nick Theodorakis Nick Theodorakis is offline
 
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I think the toothfish was marketed right from the beginning as Chilean Sea Bass.

Nick
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  #5  
Old 13 March 2011, 03:26 AM
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LizzyBean LizzyBean is offline
 
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I think garbanzo beans/chickpeas is more of a regional thing. I grew up knowing them as garbanzos on the west coast, and had never heard of them called chickpeas until I moved to the Midwest.
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Old 15 March 2011, 05:58 PM
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Chinese gooseberry --> kiwi (or kiwifruit).
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  #7  
Old 15 March 2011, 06:21 PM
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Spam & Cookies-mmm Spam & Cookies-mmm is offline
 
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I saw "dried plums" in the store just last week.
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Old 15 March 2011, 06:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LizzyBean View Post
I think garbanzo beans/chickpeas is more of a regional thing. I grew up knowing them as garbanzos on the west coast, and had never heard of them called chickpeas until I moved to the Midwest.
They're always chickpeas here. First time I saw garbanzos listed as ingredients (from a website) I confused the heck out of local stores as no-one had ever heard that term. Same happened when I came across cilantro on an ingredients list; it's always coriander here.
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Old 15 March 2011, 07:08 PM
Bettie Page Turner Bettie Page Turner is offline
 
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Cilantro refers to the leaves, coriander to the seeds. They are different.
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Old 15 March 2011, 07:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by llewtrah View Post
...when I came across cilantro on an ingredients list; it's always coriander here.
They are separate here - cilantro are the leaves and coriander are the seeds of the same plant. They taste pretty different to me.
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  #11  
Old 15 March 2011, 07:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bettie Page Turner View Post
Cilantro refers to the leaves, coriander to the seeds. They are different.
Over here, "coriander" refers to the leaves, "coriander seeds" refers to the seeds and "coriander powder" to the ground seeds. After all, it's all the same plant - coriander.
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  #12  
Old 16 March 2011, 11:06 AM
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All of these were pulled from a George Carlin book. I want to say "Napalm and Silly Putty" but may be "Briandroppings". So, that's the original source.
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