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  #1  
Old 21 January 2011, 02:17 AM
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Jenn Jenn is offline
 
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Bang Head Instant brick road

Comment: How good is this machine? No end to manís ingenuity. Tiger-Stone
is a Dutch paver laying machine that can produce brick roads.

Paving bricks are dropped by front-end-loader onto the angled trough.
Men help to spread them in the trough as they drop into the forming jig.
As the electrically operated crawler moves forward along a pre laid sand
base layer, all the stones are packed, gravity held together & descend the
sloping ramp on to the road. Isn't that amazing?













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  #2  
Old 21 January 2011, 02:52 AM
Singing in the Drizzle Singing in the Drizzle is offline
 
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The key is the first picture with the 2 men laying the bricks. The machine does not sort and place the bricks. Just makes it easier and faster for workers to do the work. The 4th pictures shows the loading bed and how bricks are laid into the machine by hand.
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  #3  
Old 21 January 2011, 04:21 AM
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Here's a video of the machine in action:



Singing in the Drizzle was correct, the machine doesn't sort the bricks.
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  #4  
Old 21 January 2011, 09:04 AM
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ETA: The Tiger-Stone website has plenty of videos too.

Last edited by Stoneage Dinosaur; 21 January 2011 at 09:29 AM.
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  #5  
Old 21 January 2011, 02:33 PM
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That sure makes a backbreaking job a lot easier.
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  #6  
Old 21 January 2011, 03:54 PM
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Considering this is in the Netherlands, wouldn't it be a bit bumpy cycling on bricks?
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  #7  
Old 21 January 2011, 04:19 PM
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A little OT, but as far as the life of the road, how do brick roads, such as the ones shown in the OP, compare to asphalt roads? Are they more expensive initially? Would the repair costs be the same?
I'm really curious about this because I think brick roads are absolutely beautiful and would love to see more of them. It seems like repair and upkeep would be easier, resulting in less or shorter road closures.
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  #8  
Old 21 January 2011, 04:49 PM
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Thats really neat. I never knew such a machine existed.
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  #9  
Old 21 January 2011, 07:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Penguin! View Post
A little OT, but as far as the life of the road, how do brick roads, such as the ones shown in the OP, compare to asphalt roads? Are they more expensive initially? Would the repair costs be the same?
I'm really curious about this because I think brick roads are absolutely beautiful and would love to see more of them. It seems like repair and upkeep would be easier, resulting in less or shorter road closures.
I would think that they would not work well for high speed roads - if one brick were damaged, the surrounding bricks could shift positions pretty quick.

I was in Berlin once and noticed some workers accessing some pipes buried under the road. When they were done, they filled the whole back in, tamped the dirt down (with a machine), then just relaid the bricks. No need for cement or ashpalt. That was a side road though. I just can't see it for major roads.
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  #10  
Old 22 January 2011, 08:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Floater View Post
Considering this is in the Netherlands, wouldn't it be a bit bumpy cycling on bricks?
It makes everyone drive slower, which can be an advantage. Bricks are used mostly for residential areas.
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  #11  
Old 22 January 2011, 09:13 AM
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Der Induktionator Der Induktionator is offline
 
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I'm curious how they get started. Once the first row is on the ground and there's about 2m in the machine, it is a lot more comfortable work position than placing brick (paving stones) on your hands and knees.

But how do they get the machine 'primed', do they place the first paving stones on the ground and then place them up the ramp until the machine is 'full', or do they have some clever way of getting it started, too? A movable backstop that can be progressively lowered perhaps, so that even the first rows are placed from the comfortable work position?

Or maybe just always keep the machine full with a set of 'starter bricks'?

The only thing I saw on their website was a row of boxes full of heavy stuff placed across the road, perhaps as an aid to get the process started.

ETA: For an American living in Switzerland used to hearing Swiss-german dialect, reading dutch is very strange.
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  #12  
Old 22 January 2011, 12:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Floater View Post
Considering this is in the Netherlands, wouldn't it be a bit bumpy cycling on bricks?
As long as it's nice and even, no problem. Older roads tend to be a bit more chalenging, though.
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  #13  
Old 23 January 2011, 10:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Der Induktionator View Post
But how do they get the machine 'primed', do they place the first paving stones on the ground and then place them up the ramp until the machine is 'full', or do they have some clever way of getting it started, too?
Quote:
Immers, de eerste meter wordt handmatig in het juiste verband aan de onderkant van het afschuifbord gelegd. Daarna hoeft de legger enkel de stenen met de juiste zijde boven af te laten glijden. De steen vindt automatisch aansluiting met het eerder gelegde verband.
Only the first row is laid by hand, on the underside of the ramp. The rest is simply slided down and automatically arraigned.
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  #14  
Old 23 January 2011, 04:46 PM
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Bricks vs. Asphalt:

Downtown Dayton, there are brick roads that had been there for a really long time that were just paved over at some point within the past 50 years (I know some of the smaller side roads used to still be brick when I visited downtown 25 years ago or so). I have seen at least parts of the roads where the asphalt has potholed and such or worn away to reveal the bricks again. So, I'd have to say, they probably last better than asphalt, at least in non-freeway type traffic. They do require more manual labor when upkeep is needed though.
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  #15  
Old 24 January 2011, 09:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dutch Angua View Post
Older roads tend to be a bit more chalenging, though.
Paris-Roubaix comes to mind.
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