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  #1  
Old 01 April 2007, 02:24 AM
Auntie Witch's Avatar
Auntie Witch Auntie Witch is offline
 
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Icon104 Civilian child vs. Military child

Chow if you must. I actually reposted this one on myspace. :o

1. A civilian child usually dances around or talks during the National Anthem. A military child stands quietly with his hand over his heart.

2. A civilian child sees race. A military child sees diversity.

3. A civilian child has a best friend in his hometown. A military child has a best friend on almost every continent.

4. A civilian child sees only the plane flying over. A military child not only can identify the type of plane flying but knows someone who works on them.

5. A civilian child smells something nasty and yells; "Eeewwww, what's that smell?". A military child smells something nasty and yells; Daddy did you FART!!!!!

6. A civilian child sees a person in uniform. A military child can tell you what branch he's in and what his rank is.

7. A civilian child thinks home is where the heart is. A military child
knows home is where the military sends you.

8. A civilian child lives for tomorrow and what it might bring. A military child lives for today because tomorrow, Daddy might get called away again.

9. A civilian child gets to kiss mommy and daddy goodnight each night. A military child sometimes has to kiss a picture of daddy or mommy goodnight.

10. A civilian child talks on the phone for fun. A military child lives for the 15 minute phone calls once a week.

11. A civilian child can read and write in English. A military child can read and write in acronym.

12. A civilian child says "good-bye". A military child says "see you later" (don't we know it, there's never GOOD BYE).

13. A civilian child gets to see things other kids would love to see. A military child gets to see things world leaders would love to see.

14. A civilian child will probably go to the same school his entire life. A military child will probably change schools every 2 years.

15. A civilian child might rarely leave his hometown for anything other than vacation. A military child will rarely see his "hometown" for anything other than vacation.

And finally...a civilian child supports our soldiers. A military child IS a soldier.
The next time you say a prayer for our troops, please say a prayer for their families, especially their children back home that are trying to be strong. (They need your prayers, more than you'll ever know)
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  #2  
Old 01 April 2007, 01:16 PM
PrometheusX303
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Auntie Witch View Post
I actually reposted this one on myspace. :o
Why?

So, all civilian children are disrespectful, ignorant, and racist?
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  #3  
Old 01 April 2007, 01:45 PM
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kitap kitap is offline
 
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Whalephant

Quote:
And finally...a civilian child supports our soldiers. A military child IS a soldier.
The next time you say a prayer for our troops, please say a prayer for their families, especially their children back home that are trying to be strong. (They need your prayers, more than you'll ever know)
Since a military child is so superior, why does he/she need prayers, especially from loser civilians?
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  #4  
Old 01 April 2007, 01:52 PM
Warlok5
 
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Military

Whoever wrote this obviously never lived in base housing and saw what TOTAL brats military kids can be..

And don't forget addind to your list the military child bully who says, if you tell, my dad will get your dad in trouble/fire your dad.

Gad - what drivel!!

Warlok
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  #5  
Old 01 April 2007, 02:17 PM
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Auntie Witch Auntie Witch is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PrometheusX303 View Post
Why?

So, all civilian children are disrespectful, ignorant, and racist?
That's not the impression I got from this. But a lot of this rings true for where I live. Perhaps it is because I'm in a largely rural area with little diversity and a lot of ignorance about the world. I work with kids who never leave town unless they go on a field trip.
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  #6  
Old 01 April 2007, 02:38 PM
Jay Tea Jay Tea is offline
 
 
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My parents met in the military, hence my upbringing was somewhat itinerant to say the least.

Some immutable truths of a Forces upbring are:

A friend for over a year is a real novelty.

No matter where you are on the globe, military bases all look the same, only the climate differs, And the quality of the local TV.

Settling into a new school, is, well, a piece of doddle after the third or fourth time.

People from 'The World' who've lived in the same place all their lives are envied. They have friends they've known for years, extended family in the area, they are allowed pets.

An American serviceman/woman and their goodies are soon parted when confronted with cute British kids.

American servicemen do the best barbeques.

Fast Jets are cool.
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  #7  
Old 01 April 2007, 06:38 PM
mcolakis mcolakis is offline
 
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Cheer

Quote:
Originally Posted by Auntie Witch View Post
5. A civilian child smells something nasty and yells; "Eeewwww, what's that smell?". A military child smells something nasty and yells; Daddy did you FART!!!!!
I get the picture overall, but this one seemed really out of place. Do military kids learn crude language earlier than civilian kids? A really mannerly person will pretend that farts didn't happen, but it seems next to impossible to teach this to kids.
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  #8  
Old 01 April 2007, 06:49 PM
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Sylvanz Sylvanz is online now
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Auntie Witch View Post
That's not the impression I got from this. But a lot of this rings true for where I live. Perhaps it is because I'm in a largely rural area with little diversity and a lot of ignorance about the world. I work with kids who never leave town unless they go on a field trip.
I have to agree with Prometheusx303 Auntie. Much of that was mean spirted and made "civilian kids" all seem narrow, racist, rude, and ignorant. As for the pledge thing puhhhhleeese. There are dozens of civilian kids taught the hand over the heart thing. Not mine because I really think that sort of reverence for the flag shouldn't be taught. I just find that piece sort of sickening and "us" and "them" ish. YMMV I'm sure.

P&LL, Syl
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  #9  
Old 01 April 2007, 07:09 PM
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bthyb bthyb is offline
 
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I certainly knew to respect the flag, and I knew diversity.

Maybe growing up in a highly diverse area (Washington, DC) is part of that, but many civilian kids grow up in diverse areas.

Generalizations never tell the whole story. The older I get, the more shades of gray I see.
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  #10  
Old 01 April 2007, 07:29 PM
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snapdragonfly snapdragonfly is offline
 
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Originally Posted by mcolakis View Post
I get the picture overall, but this one seemed really out of place. Do military kids learn crude language earlier than civilian kids? A really mannerly person will pretend that farts didn't happen, but it seems next to impossible to teach this to kids.

That one mystifies me too.

That whole article is just ridiculous to me. I've been both civilian and military kid - and I moved more often as a civilian.
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  #11  
Old 01 April 2007, 08:25 PM
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Ramblin' Dave Ramblin' Dave is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay Tea View Post

Some immutable truths of a Forces upbring are:

A friend for over a year is a real novelty.
For a lot of civilian children, the same is true. You might continue to go to school with your former best friend for the next five or six years, but you haven't been friends ever since he joined in with the other kids who picked on you over your new haircut in fourth grade, or some such.

Quote:
People from 'The World' who've lived in the same place all their lives are envied. They have friends they've known for years, extended family in the area, they are allowed pets.
The grass is always greener...I was an "ex-military brat" (Dad quit the service when I was two, so ours was a military family just long enough for me to be born overseas and subjected to a lifetime of know-it-alls incorrectly informing me that I can't be president). I grew up in a cruddy New England milltown, went to school with the same kids for ten years, was not popular at all among them because I was quiet and well-dressed, and spent years wishing Dad had stayed in the service so we could travel all over the country and I could make a fresh start at a new school. Trust me, when you're trying to make friends and get dates as late as age 16 and there are people in the community who remember you crying over untied shoes when you were seven, a new school every two years sounds absolutely heavenly.
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  #12  
Old 01 April 2007, 10:49 PM
PrometheusX303
 
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I've known some military families (Air Force and Navy). Military life is different, but not as much as this list would have you think. (In terms of raising a child, that is)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Auntie Witch View Post
1. A civilian child usually dances around or talks during the National Anthem. A military child stands quietly with his hand over his heart.
Depends on how the child is raised. I was taught to place my hand over my heart and recite the anthem. AAMOF, watch a ball game sometime. There are plenty of kids in the crowd who are doing so.

Quote:
2. A civilian child sees race. A military child sees diversity.
Again, depends on upbringing. I was not raised to let "race" color my opinion of a person. And military parents can still be racist.

Quote:
3. A civilian child has a best friend in his hometown. A military child has a best friend on almost every continent.
That might be true, depending on the child. However, those that I know don't keep in touch with those friends.

Quote:
4. A civilian child sees only the plane flying over. A military child not only can identify the type of plane flying but knows someone who works on them.
A civilian child might also be interested in aircraft and could do this too. My friend's father was in the Air Force. His son may know a bit about certain aircraft, but his daughter wouldn't give a tinker's cuss about them.

I've also met kids who could practically rebuild you car's engine or give you the history of boatcraft because that is what they were interested in.

Quote:
5. A civilian child smells something nasty and yells; "Eeewwww, what's that smell?". A military child smells something nasty and yells; Daddy did you FART!!!!!
This one is changed from the original:
5. A civilian child smells something nasty and yells; "Eeewwww, what's that smell?". A military child smells something nasty and yells; "M.O.P.P. 4! M.O.P.P. 4!!

Quote:
6. A civilian child sees a person in uniform. A military child can tell you what branch he's in and what his rank is.
Again, a civilian child can do this, too, if that is what he is interested in. My brother could probably name most of the weapons and machines used in the civil war and World Wars I and II.

Quote:
7. A civilian child thinks home is where the heart is. A military child
knows home is where the military sends you.
Can it not be both?

Quote:
8. A civilian child lives for tomorrow and what it might bring. A military child lives for today because tomorrow, Daddy might get called away again.
I'm not quite sure how to respond to this one, except to say that it may be another matter of upbringing.

Quote:
9. A civilian child gets to kiss mommy and daddy goodnight each night. A military child sometimes has to kiss a picture of daddy or mommy goodnight.
Sorry. This one is bad. I lost my father when I was two years old, so I didn't get to kiss him goodnight.
Civilian families are sometimes broken and separated, too.

Quote:
10. A civilian child talks on the phone for fun. A military child lives for the 15 minute phone calls once a week.
I found it hard to wait for my Grandpa to call from Illinois once every few months.

Quote:
11. A civilian child can read and write in English. A military child can read and write in acronym.
A civilian immigrant child might read and write in English AND their native language. Much more useful that knowing what FUBAR means.

Quote:
12. A civilian child says "good-bye". A military child says "see you later" (don't we know it, there's never GOOD BYE).
Depends on how the child was taught about departing friends and family.

Quote:
13. A civilian child gets to see things other kids would love to see. A military child gets to see things world leaders would love to see.
Like what?

Quote:
14. A civilian child will probably go to the same school his entire life. A military child will probably change schools every 2 years.
Both civilian and military children can be homeschooled, right?

Quote:
15. A civilian child might rarely leave his hometown for anything other than vacation. A military child will rarely see his "hometown" for anything other than vacation.
Depends on the family.

Quote:
And finally...a civilian child supports our soldiers. A military child IS a soldier.
The next time you say a prayer for our troops, please say a prayer for their families, especially their children back home that are trying to be strong. (They need your prayers, more than you'll ever know)
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  #13  
Old 02 April 2007, 12:32 AM
Jay Tea Jay Tea is offline
 
 
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Quote:
The grass is always greener...
Perhaps. I never met a single kid out of thousands who wanted a share of our lives as wandering ghost-children.

Don't get me wrong, I never had any roots, and was a total tumble-weed kid, but to this day I have characteristics gleaned from this upbringing that I wouldn't trade. Not many though.
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  #14  
Old 02 April 2007, 12:35 AM
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Phaedra Phaedra is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcolakis View Post
I get the picture overall, but this one seemed really out of place. Do military kids learn crude language earlier than civilian kids?
Rude language is but the half of it.
I remember well my father (British army officer) telling the most appalling, and occasionally funny, filthy jokes at the dinner table. Landed me in no end of trouble one evening at one of my mothers stultifyingly boring soirees when I was fifteen.
She was banging on to the assembled company about a fabulously handsome Yemeni officer she worked with and said, with a giggle, "of course he is far too tall for me".
Somewhat absentmindedly and bored out of my skull I said, remembering one of my fathers so called jokes and trying to be funny, "Oh really I thought we were all the same on our backs". I shall never forget the expression on her face or her icy tone when she said. "Fiona you may go to your room now" :o
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  #15  
Old 02 April 2007, 05:11 AM
Venus Venus is offline
 
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I was a military child and i could never tell apart the different uniforms and planes. Cause i didn't care. I wouldn't have been able to tell you what rank my own dad was either.
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  #16  
Old 02 April 2007, 01:13 PM
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High Eight High Eight is offline
 
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A civilian child sees race. A military child sees targets.
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  #17  
Old 02 April 2007, 08:16 PM
Malalaise
 
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"13. A civilian child gets to see things other kids would love to see. A military child gets to see things world leaders would love to see."

This is the only one that is somewhat right. Children who travel a lot (be they military children or not) get a vast perspective of the world that few can understand,and that most world leaders desperately need.After going to Africa last year I can say that no National Geographic articles can prepare you for the truth about the outside world.
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  #18  
Old 02 April 2007, 09:38 PM
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snoozn snoozn is offline
 
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My oldest was in a similar position to Ramblin' Dave, DH got out of the Army when she was three or four. But I have been around alot of military and civilian kids and I don't agree with most of this. Kids are kids and they are a diverse lot whether they're military or civilian.

One point that I somewhat agree with is on race (depending on where the civilian lives). If you live on post, you are going to know families of many ethnicities including many of mixed ethnicities. When my daughter was in military day-care she was with virtual rainbow of children. Now we live in whitey-world more or less and I think my kids are missing out on some good lessons of multiculturalism.

And, I have to say the foul language one is true for our family, but it's far beyond saying the word "fart." I've about given up on my 14 yr old and just tell her not to talk like that in front of her younger siblings.

And military children are forced to make sacrifices, but I'm not sure that's different from growing up in any number of other stressful circumstances. The average civilian child in Iraq probably has a tough time with "Good-byes" too.

snoozn
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  #19  
Old 02 April 2007, 10:40 PM
Page Three
 
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Quote:
1. A civilian child usually dances around or talks during the National Anthem. A military child stands quietly with his hand over his heart.
That one actually scares me. So does the hand-over-heart gesture in adults; but children should dance or talk. Nobody will appreciate them doing this when they're adults, and they can decide to be patriotic or not when they're old enough to understand what it means.

Quote:
3. A civilian child has a best friend in his hometown. A military child has a best friend on almost every continent.
...but not of foreign nationality, in most cases. Families who let their children make contacts off base when abroad are a rarity in my experience. I know military families who have decided to stay in Germany (good on them!) but still have hardly any contact with us unwashed natives.

Quote:
4. A civilian child sees only the plane flying over. A military child not only can identify the type of plane flying but knows someone who works on them.
I know children who can identify more animals, types of trees, dinosaurs, types of car etc. than most adults. Most children will at some point have a huge fascination with some subject. Military children see more planes than other children do. And the point is?

Quote:
5. A civilian child smells something nasty and yells; "Eeewwww, what's that smell?". A military child smells something nasty and yells; Daddy did you FART!!!!!
...and will be in for a surprise when entering civil -ian/-ized society. Although it is a bit unusual to end questions with five pronounced exclamation marks -- extra points for vocal creativity.

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6. A civilian child sees a person in uniform. A military child can tell you what branch he's in and what his rank is.
See 4.

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11. A civilian child can read and write in English. A military child can read and write in acronym.
See 5. Personally, I prefer English. More people speak it. Now, if this said "...have a chance to pick up foreign languages", and if this actually happened, I'd be cool with it.

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13. A civilian child gets to see things other kids would love to see. A military child gets to see things world leaders would love to see.
Doubt it. Again, from what I've seen, that's mostly the inside of bases when abroad.

Quote:
And finally...a civilian child supports our soldiers. A military child IS a soldier.
Hopefully not. There are real child soldiers out there, and anyone who thinks that's a good thing has some very strange ideas about what children should be doing with their childhood. "A military child IS a soldier" simply doesn't have a positive ring to it, sorry.

If it wasn't for the fawning adoration for either unremarkable or simply negative aspects, I'd totally go along with it: Military children have to put up with some very tough things in their childhood and deserve some extra respect for putting up with them (what with not even having a choice and all).

But you don't have to make negative things sound positive to have that acknowledged or to get respect. You'll just make the civilians think you're rude.
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  #20  
Old 02 April 2007, 10:59 PM
We'veBeenHad
 
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We always stood with our hands on our hearts, quietly, for the pledge and then a song - often the Star Spangled Banner. Our children did the same. None of us are military. But I don't see what's scary about that.

As far as "Did you fart?" I never knew a kid who didn't say that
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