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  #1  
Old 26 March 2007, 06:36 PM
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Icon106 Disney may reissue 'Song of the South'

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The movie remains hidden in the Disney archives -- never released on video in the United States and criticized as racist for its depiction of Southern plantation blacks. The film's 60th anniversary passed last year without a whisper of official rerelease, which is unusual for Disney, but President and CEO Bob Iger recently said the company was reconsidering.
http://www.floridatoday.com/apps/pbc...703240309/1005
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  #2  
Old 26 March 2007, 09:09 PM
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Originally Posted by snopes View Post
How nice. It is a movie that should be watched ; since its reflective of the time it was animated in.


anyone who has picked up teh recenlty released DVD's of Sesame Streets' (earlier years); there is a Warning lable that comes with it, which surprised the heck out of me

They warn that the content may not be suitable for kids; because it was made in a time and generation for a different audience.
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  #3  
Old 26 March 2007, 09:44 PM
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They should finesse it: release it to the public domain. That way, they aren't responsible for publishing it.

Hell, as far as I am concerned, the movie is in the public domain, because of Disney's refusal to publish it. Copyright protection is intended to protect profits, and if a company refuses even to attempt to make a profit on a work, then it is not holding up its end of the bargain.

I would dearly love to see this point clarified in a trial someday...

(I was going to make a comparison to Aspirin and Kleenex, but that's almost exactly the opposite legal point!)

Silas
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  #4  
Old 26 March 2007, 09:47 PM
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Copyright preserves not only actual profits, but potential profits, hypothetical scenarios, and suchlike. I have no intent on selling my writing any time soon, but I still (technically) have the copyright on it...
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  #5  
Old 26 March 2007, 09:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wizywyg View Post
anyone who has picked up teh recenlty released DVD's of Sesame Streets' (earlier years); there is a Warning lable that comes with it, which surprised the heck out of me

They warn that the content may not be suitable for kids; because it was made in a time and generation for a different audience.
Hold up...what's controversial or unsuitable about early Sesame Street?
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  #6  
Old 26 March 2007, 10:25 PM
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Hell, as far as I am concerned, the movie is in the public domain, because of Disney's refusal to publish it. Copyright protection is intended to protect profits, and if a company refuses even to attempt to make a profit on a work, then it is not holding up its end of the bargain.
But that isn't the case. Disney is indeed making a profit from publishing the film; they just aren't currently selling it in the U.S. market.

- snopes
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  #7  
Old 27 March 2007, 04:57 AM
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I actually agree that they should reissue it. I'm surprising myself with that statement.

But yeah, with an appropriate warning label and an extremely limited release, and NOT placed in normal children's sections of stores. I'd hate to see 10 on every shelf at the video store next to "Dora the Explorer" and "Bambi" dvds. But what better tool for classes about race issues-- I'm thinking especially at the college level? We can't just lock all the naughty parts of our history in the Disney vault, and pretend racism never existed (and CERTAINLY still doesn't! ) But if examples like this are out in the open, we can study them and learn from our culture's idiotic mistakes.

Just my $0.02.
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  #8  
Old 27 March 2007, 12:58 PM
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And of course there's no racism in any of Disney's other films. Peter Pan was just re-released on DVD; did anyone here buy it? I'm curious as to whether the "What Made the Red Man Red?" scene is still included. I didn't think anything about it when I was a kid, but I did a report last semester on images of American Indians in popular culture and my jaw dropped when I read over the lyrics to that song.
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  #9  
Old 27 March 2007, 01:35 PM
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Yes, of course the Indian scene is still in the movie. (My son recently got it for his birthday.) The fact that you yourself didn't think anything of it as a kid speaks about the scene itself. You didn't grow up believing all Native Americans acted this way, did you? You, even as a young child saw it for what it was and still is- a movie for children.

The mermaid scene is still there, and that can be construed as offensive too- catty women slapping each other and pulling hair over a boy who doesn't even really care about them. Neverland is a universe of children's fantasies, and even children today have similar thoughts and imaginations as children did 100 years ago. Children aren't supposed to be politically correct, they're supposed to let they're fantasies run wild- see mermaids, fight pirates, and play extreme cowboys and Indians.
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  #10  
Old 27 March 2007, 03:57 PM
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Originally Posted by Trixie Tang View Post
.....
The mermaid scene is still there, and that can be construed as offensive too- catty women slapping each other and pulling hair ....
Mm-boy, I have to get that DVD!
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  #11  
Old 27 March 2007, 04:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silas Sparkhammer View Post
They should finesse it: release it to the public domain. That way, they aren't responsible for publishing it.

Hell, as far as I am concerned, the movie is in the public domain, because of Disney's refusal to publish it. Copyright protection is intended to protect profits, and if a company refuses even to attempt to make a profit on a work, then it is not holding up its end of the bargain.

I would dearly love to see this point clarified in a trial someday...

(I was going to make a comparison to Aspirin and Kleenex, but that's almost exactly the opposite legal point!)

Silas
Not to mention Aspirin and Kleenex were/are trademarks, covered by a different law with a different purpose.

Seaboe
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  #12  
Old 27 March 2007, 04:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trixie Tang View Post
Yes, of course the Indian scene is still in the movie. (My son recently got it for his birthday.) The fact that you yourself didn't think anything of it as a kid speaks about the scene itself. You didn't grow up believing all Native Americans acted this way, did you?
I did. Not that scene specifically, but the cultural image of the Native American is the only one I was exposed to growing up and it wasn't until late teenagerhood that I became aware that not all of them lived in the "traditional way" (or the media representation thereof).

Admittedly I'm not from the US so my exposure is necessarily limited but I wouldn't be surprised if some USAns shared my experience.
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  #13  
Old 27 March 2007, 04:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonny T View Post
I did. Not that scene specifically, but the cultural image of the Native American is the only one I was exposed to growing up and it wasn't until late teenagerhood that I became aware that not all of them lived in the "traditional way" (or the media representation thereof).
Well, eventually Pochantas did come out.
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  #14  
Old 27 March 2007, 08:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Strawberry Limeade View Post
And of course there's no racism in any of Disney's other films. Peter Pan was just re-released on DVD; did anyone here buy it? I'm curious as to whether the "What Made the Red Man Red?" scene is still included. I didn't think anything about it when I was a kid, but I did a report last semester on images of American Indians in popular culture and my jaw dropped when I read over the lyrics to that song.
I find that scene endearing, even today. The Red Man is Red...because he's blushing from his first kiss. That's sweet! As naive Lamarckian fairy tales go, it beats the snot out of Kipling's "Just So Stories."

(Hell, millions of people believe that Blacks are dark because of the curse of Ham! Should we excise the story of the sons of Noah from the Bible?)

I think that intent should count for a lot more than it does these days; we have an almost daily furore over the "N word" in Mark Twain's writing, which only indicates the vast ignorance of the people who are complaining the loudest.

We should annotate the past, but never alter it.

Silas (I'm ticked at Disney for taking the cigarettes away from Pecos Bill!)
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  #15  
Old 28 March 2007, 01:58 AM
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Disney

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wizywyg View Post
How nice. It is a movie that should be watched ; since its reflective of the time it was animated in.


anyone who has picked up teh recenlty released DVD's of Sesame Streets' (earlier years); there is a Warning lable that comes with it, which surprised the heck out of me

They warn that the content may not be suitable for kids; because it was made in a time and generation for a different audience.
Seconding Artemis's curiosity here. What makes it unsuitable? Is it the polyester clothes?
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  #16  
Old 28 March 2007, 06:21 AM
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Icon84 Will Disney's 'South' Rise Again?

The movie remains hidden in the Disney archives -- never released on home video in the United States and criticized as racist for its depiction of Southern plantation blacks. The film's 60th anniversary passed last year without a whisper of official rerelease, which is unusual for Disney, but CEO Bob Iger recently said the company was reconsidering.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...032702315.html
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  #17  
Old 28 March 2007, 02:26 PM
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I remember watching Song of the South in a theater when I was 4 or 5. I guess they re-released it or something. My mom made a special point to take me to see it, and I vaguely remember having some long talks afterwards about it. It's important to preserve and watch films like that. If we don't keep in mind where we came from, it becomes much easier to slip back. Disney should release the film, not lock it away and pretend it didn't happen.

Also, I'm curious about what's wrong with old Sesame Street episodes. I don't recall anything racist in them. In fact, I thought they were ahead of their time in that they displayed diversity with the children and adult actors.

Old LooneyToons on the other hand certainly have some hair raising (hare raising-yuk yuk yuk) moments. Those have a disclaimer at the beginning stating that the attitudes displayed were products of their time and were wrong then as they are wrong now. Or something like that.
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  #18  
Old 28 March 2007, 08:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PallasAthena View Post
Also, I'm curious about what's wrong with old Sesame Street episodes. I don't recall anything racist in them. In fact, I thought they were ahead of their time in that they displayed diversity with the children and adult actors.

Old LooneyToons on the other hand certainly have some hair raising (hare raising-yuk yuk yuk) moments. Those have a disclaimer at the beginning stating that the attitudes displayed were products of their time and were wrong then as they are wrong now. Or something like that.
Good point on the Looney Toons. I remember seeing some of the old war propaganda ones. Definitely products of the time. But I can't ever remember seeing anything like that on Sesame Street. The people who made Sesame Street seemed so politically aware, and very sensitive, especially for the time.
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  #19  
Old 28 March 2007, 08:15 PM
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I think the chances of the Song of the South seeing the light of day are just about as good as seeing Sunflower re-edited back into the Pastoral Symphony segment of Fantasia.
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  #20  
Old 28 March 2007, 08:25 PM
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I mean, Sesame Street was Jim Henson's for goodness sakes!
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