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  #1  
Old 03 October 2009, 11:53 PM
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Icon13 Encyclopedia Britannica banned in Texas

Comment: I've seen in several places that the Encyclopedia Britannica is banned in
Texas - because it contains a formula for making beer. Is this true?
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  #2  
Old 04 October 2009, 02:06 AM
haakonsson
 
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Okay, I am having the issue of expecting logic in a comment, I could see saying this about a few states at least but Texas would not be on that list. Utah would be pretty high. Maybe like Oklahoma, but not Texas.
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Old 04 October 2009, 02:15 AM
Insensible Crier Insensible Crier is offline
 
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Well the 1918 version doesn't have anything close to a recipe. The online version has a very detailed description of the brewing process but still short of what you would need to know in order to make beer.

I really doubt they would block an encyclopedia when there are a truckload of free sites devoted to nothing but beer recipes and how to make beer.
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  #4  
Old 04 October 2009, 06:25 PM
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Tarquin Farquart Tarquin Farquart is offline
 
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I thought this would be about it being called "Britannica" instead of something American.
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  #5  
Old 05 October 2009, 01:47 AM
Insensible Crier Insensible Crier is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tarquin Farquart View Post
I thought this would be about it being called "Britannica" instead of something American.
There is an Encyclopedia Americana but it isn't as well known here (in my experience) as Encyclopedia Britannica. Ironic isn't it?
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  #6  
Old 05 October 2009, 02:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by haakonsson View Post
Okay, I am having the issue of expecting logic in a comment, I could see saying this about a few states at least but Texas would not be on that list. Utah would be pretty high. Maybe like Oklahoma, but not Texas.
Did you know that many, many counties in TX ban the sale of alcohol? Dallas County is even a dry county. The ban is as plausible here as anywhere else-- meaning not very, but the state has little to do with it.


FWIW, it's legal in TX to brew your own beer for personal consumption. Mr S wanted to try out the Sam Adams home brewing kit so he contacted our local police station to ask if it was legal (we live in a dry county). They had to do some research and get back to us, but turns out it is perfectly legal. The officer who called also asked for the ordering information because he wanted to give it a try himself.
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  #7  
Old 05 October 2009, 01:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Insensible Crier View Post
There is an Encyclopedia Americana but it isn't as well known here (in my experience) as Encyclopedia Britannica.
Or as good.
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Old 05 October 2009, 01:41 PM
Magdalene Magdalene is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Starla View Post
Did you know that many, many counties in TX ban the sale of alcohol? Dallas County is even a dry county. The ban is as plausible here as anywhere else-- meaning not very, but the state has little to do with it.
And Ft. Hood straddles two counties, with one of them being a dry one.

Magdalene
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  #9  
Old 05 October 2009, 04:43 PM
purpleiguana purpleiguana is offline
 
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Is Texas going to ban the internet, too? Or just every single site that so much as mentions beer?

No idea whether or not the OP is true, but it wouldn't surprise me for bureaucrats to chuck a pebble out of the road without bothering to take notice of the boulder.
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  #10  
Old 05 October 2009, 04:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by purpleiguana View Post
No idea whether or not the OP is true, but it wouldn't surprise me for bureaucrats to chuck a pebble out of the road without bothering to take notice of the boulder.
Well, before we start accusing bureacrats of stupidity (a fun pasttime I enjoy as well), it's best to find out if this is true or not. The Texas State Library has the Encyclopedia Britannica online so it isn't likely that the whole encyclopedia is banned in all of Texas. Link
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  #11  
Old 05 October 2009, 05:03 PM
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Of course it's ridiculous to think that an entire state would ban an encyclopedia based on one article. That would be clearly a violation of the First Amendment.

But thought of one possibility that might explain the comment in the OP: if the Encyclopedia Britannica were banned in Texas high school libraries because of its content, that might have led to such a UL. But a little checking shows that not to be true, as I came across this announcement that the Encyclopedia Britannica will be offered as part of a K-12 database in Texas.
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  #12  
Old 05 October 2009, 05:38 PM
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When I first saw this thread I thought the ban might be because the encyclopaedia is published in Scotland (famous for releasing a certain convicted murderer) and has a Scottish thistle on its spine (at least my set for children does).
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  #13  
Old 05 October 2009, 07:12 PM
Insensible Crier Insensible Crier is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RealityChuck View Post
Or as good.
I've actually never seen one. It was always Britannica or World Book back when I still used hard-copies.
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  #14  
Old 14 October 2009, 07:38 PM
Assilem Brandywine Assilem Brandywine is offline
 
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Well, when I was in High School in Texas the library had Encyclopedia Britanica. I don't know about Dallas being a dry county, having lived there with an uncle who liked beer flavored snow cones.
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  #15  
Old 16 October 2009, 03:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Assilem Brandywine View Post
I don't know about Dallas being a dry county, having lived there with an uncle who liked beer flavored snow cones.
Dallas is partially wet. You can download an excel spreadsheet from this link that gets into specifics, but basically alcohol sales are allowed in restaurants and bars and it looks like a few areas in the county allow some alcohol to be sold in stores.

Everyone I know calls partially wet counties "dry" even though it's not entirely accurate. For everyday use, in my part of Texas at least, saying "dry county" means no liquor sales in stores, and "totally dry county" lets you know you can't even get a beer at a restaurant.
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  #16  
Old 16 October 2009, 04:35 AM
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C'mon - who doesn't know how to make beer?

Maybe it takes education to make good beer, but making rubbish beer for the hit is fairly basic stuff. Water, Hops, barley, yeast, sugar and wait.
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  #17  
Old 21 February 2010, 05:58 PM
RichardM RichardM is offline
 
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Living in Dallas county I can state that it is not a dry county. Originally, the only part of Dallas county that was wet was Justice of the Peace District No. 1 as of 1936 when the first election deciding wet/dry after the repeal of prohibition was held. The western edge of this district was the Trinity River. Today, that same boundary is used except that the Trinity River was moved about a mile west but the only river course remains the boundary. For an example of this, look at the liquor stores on Mockingbird Lane. There are 2 or 3 just east of a little creek near Brookriver Driver but none west of the creek. In 1936, that creek was the Trinity.

Other parts of Dallas have gone wet on local option elections over the years including the town of Buckingham which is no longer a town but has been absorbed by Richardson. That explains why there are 3 liquor stores south of Spring Valley Road but none north of it.

The city of Addison is also wet with a local ordinance restricting liquor stores to Inwood Road.

And by the way, I also have an Encyclopedia Britanica purchased here in Texas sitting on the bookshelf.
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  #18  
Old 22 February 2010, 12:17 AM
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There are plenty of liquor stores in Dallas. I have a drink all of about twice a year, so I don't pay much attention to how the city is zoned, but I don't have to look far or hard to find hard liquor if I want it. The various suburbs have different policies - most allow beer and wine in grocery stores. I live in one of the ones that's almost completely dry...no sales in stores at all, and in restaurants only specifically zoned for it (which in practice means the ones that line the main interstate, with the outlying ones dry).

But for the most part, beer flows pretty freely in Dallas County.
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  #19  
Old 22 February 2010, 12:38 AM
Gayle Gayle is offline
 
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It's not the dumbest rumor I've ever heard, but it's definitely in the top of the running.
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  #20  
Old 22 February 2010, 01:19 PM
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I don't live in Dallas but visit it and never really noticed an absence of liquor stores. In fact my ex works for a chain of them there so I'd be surprised to know the whole area was dry, some parts of it certainly are not.

Now I, on the other hand, do live in a dry county. And my parent's house on Lake Fork is in a dry county - but I *think* they just voted it wet this year. Not us though. You have to drive to State Line, where one side of the street is in Texas, and the other side of the street is on the Arkansas side which is wet, and is lined with liquor stores, to get alcohol. Either that or drive to Domino, which is a wee little speck of a town on the Texas side right in the next county, right on the county line, whose only two enterprises are two gas stations that sell beer; most of their sales come on Sunday, because in Arkansas the liquor stores are closed on Sunday. There's only one reason to go to Domino and that's if you run out of beer on Sunday.


(and guess who contributes the most money to defeating the proposals to legalize liquor stores in Bowie county...it's funny to see fundie Baptists in bed with liquor store owners that they won't permit to join their church...)

I'm sure there are Encyclopedia Brittanica's all over Texas though.
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