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Old 06 August 2009, 05:04 PM
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Jenn Jenn is offline
 
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Airplane 1930s Russian K-7 Heavy Bomber

Comment: I'm not sure that it is real. Some aspects of it make no sense. Like the cannons... they are in some pictures and not in others implying that they are easily removable or that they had two versions of the thing. The cannons would by necessity be enormously heavy and also quite worthless. There is no way they could be fired accurately. But, it might be real and it is surely interesting:

You Think Spruce Goose Is Big? UNBELIEVABLE!

Now that's an airplane that would make a radar man sit up and take notice. Built in Russia during the 1930's, it flew 11 times before crashing and killing 15 people. The designer, Konstantin Kalinin, wanted to build two more planes but the project was scrapped. Later, Stalin had Kalinin executed. Evidently, it was not good to fail on an expensive project under Stalin.

It's got propellers on the back of the wings, too. You can count 12 engines facing front. The size would be equivalent to the Empire State Building on its side, with cannons. And you think the 747 was big... not only a bunch of engines but check out the cannons the thing was carrying.

In the 1930's the Russian army was obsessed by the idea of creating huge planes. At that time they were proposed to have as many propellers as possible to help carrying those huge flying fortresses into the air, jet propulsion has not been implemented yet.

Not many photos were saved from those times because of the high secrecy levels of such projects and because a lot of time has already passed. Still, on the attached photos you can see one such plane - a heavy bomber K-7.





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  #2  
Old 06 August 2009, 05:20 PM
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Tootsie Plunkette Tootsie Plunkette is online now
 
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Those all look computer-generated to me.
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  #3  
Old 06 August 2009, 05:27 PM
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hambubba hambubba is offline
 
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Nice plane. Check this out:

Four Engines. Same model #.

Here's the original pics attacking a UFO.

The rumor noted and debunked.
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  #4  
Old 06 August 2009, 07:45 PM
jimmy101_again jimmy101_again is offline
 
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Hmmm, 1930's era Russian military photo in color. Not only were the Ruskies advanced in aircraft but also in photo technologies.

And the first photo looks like the plane has a triple 16" battleship gun turret on the top. Fire that in flight and you'll have instant kindling flying in formation.
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  #5  
Old 06 August 2009, 07:53 PM
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DemonWolf DemonWolf is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmy101_again View Post
Hmmm, 1930's era Russian military photo in color. Not only were the Ruskies advanced in aircraft but also in photo technologies.
Couln't the photo have been taken recently? The plane could be on display at an air museum or something.
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  #6  
Old 06 August 2009, 08:04 PM
KirkMcD KirkMcD is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DemonWolf View Post
Couln't the photo have been taken recently?
They're not photos. It's all CGI.
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  #7  
Old 07 August 2009, 06:32 AM
Troberg Troberg is offline
 
 
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Another link for information about the Kalinin K-7, this one with nice front and top views:

http://www.ctrl-c.liu.se/misc/ram/k7giant.html
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  #8  
Old 07 August 2009, 11:01 PM
jimmy101_again jimmy101_again is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DemonWolf View Post
Couln't the photo have been taken recently? The plane could be on display at an air museum or something.
Kind of hard if the plane crashed in th 1930's. Besides, if it was at a museum there would photo's of it all over the web.

CGI. Not particulary good CGI at that, about what a typical PC game graphics card would do.
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  #9  
Old 13 February 2010, 05:00 PM
Howardsend
 
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The attached images of the supposed K-7 are computer generated and somewhat fanciful, but they are loosely based on an actual prototype K-7 that was in fact designed, built and flown in 1933 by Konstantin Kalinin.
For more information on the actual aircraft, see:



The renderings depart fro the original design in the following ways:

•*the rendered version is at least twice the scale of the original (compare the height of the passengers and crew to the landing gear enclosure in the rendered and original versions)

• the rendered version has 12 engines, the original had 7

• windows in the original were in the fuselage, not in the leading edge of the wing as in the rendering.

The original design was destroyed, but its many innovations moved the state of Russian aircraft design forward.
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  #10  
Old 15 February 2010, 08:43 AM
Troberg Troberg is offline
 
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Howardsend View Post
• windows in the original were in the fuselage, not in the leading edge of the wing as in the rendering.
I think the windows in the wings were planned for the civilian transport model, which never got into production, not even as a prototype.
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