snopes.com  

Go Back   snopes.com > Urban Legends > Food

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 05 March 2007, 05:13 PM
snopes's Avatar
snopes snopes is offline
 
Join Date: 18 February 2000
Location: California
Posts: 109,645
Icon23 Mmmm, Tasty Chemicals

A new book 'deconstructs' a Twinkie and analyzes all 39 ingredients.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/17303919/site/newsweek/
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 05 March 2007, 05:16 PM
snapdragonfly's Avatar
snapdragonfly snapdragonfly is offline
 
Join Date: 15 March 2006
Location: Texas
Posts: 10,731
Default

Blech. I've tasted spitballs that were better than Twinkies. Gross.

Now, on the other hand, I could be tempted with a Ding Dong...love that waxy chocolate.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 05 March 2007, 05:30 PM
Doug4.7
 
Posts: n/a
Fright

Just because it is a "chemical" does not make it bad/good. You should see what goes on to make your morning sausage....
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 05 March 2007, 05:34 PM
BringTheNoise's Avatar
BringTheNoise BringTheNoise is offline
 
Join Date: 10 November 2003
Location: Aberdeen, Scotland
Posts: 7,304
Default

You could probably scare a few people by "deconstructing" an orange. Nothing but scare tactics.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 05 March 2007, 05:39 PM
Spam & Cookies-mmm's Avatar
Spam & Cookies-mmm Spam & Cookies-mmm is offline
 
Join Date: 09 July 2002
Location: Northwest Florida
Posts: 12,864
Default

I think it's taking the "mmm - tasty chemicals" joke a bit too far when they push this comment about cornstarch:
Quote:
Cornstarch is a common thickener. But it's more often used to make cardboard and packing peanuts
Just because a food item is used in manufacturing other products doesn't make the food icky.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 05 March 2007, 05:40 PM
Doug4.7
 
Posts: n/a
Icon202

Quote:
Originally Posted by BringTheNoise View Post
You could probably scare a few people by "deconstructing" an orange. Nothing but scare tactics.
True, it contains citric ACID!
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 05 March 2007, 05:42 PM
Nick Theodorakis Nick Theodorakis is offline
 
Join Date: 05 November 2005
Location: Fishers, IN
Posts: 6,657
Default

The opening paragraph is more than a bit disingenuous. It describes a mine in which baking soda is being mined (as if it's horrifying to eat something that came out of the ground), yet that ingredient is commonly used in baking "from scratch." It's even one of the "six ingredients" you use when you bake a cake at home.

Nick
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 05 March 2007, 05:48 PM
BringTheNoise's Avatar
BringTheNoise BringTheNoise is offline
 
Join Date: 10 November 2003
Location: Aberdeen, Scotland
Posts: 7,304
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug4.7 View Post
True, it contains citric ACID!
My thinking exactly! *Puts in tinfoil gumshield*

ETA:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick Theodorakis View Post
(as if it's horrifying to eat something that came out of the ground), Nick
That's why all my vegetables are cloned in a sterile labratory!
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 05 March 2007, 05:58 PM
Aud 1 Aud 1 is offline
 
Join Date: 05 October 2005
Location: Missouri
Posts: 7,159
Default

To be fair the article does say
Quote:
Ultimately, all food, natural and otherwise, is composed of chemical compounds—and normal ingredients like salt have industrial applications, too.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 05 March 2007, 06:00 PM
matches
 
Posts: n/a
Icon23

Do twinkies contain artificial of natrual vanilla? Are they ever manufactured in Mexico?

http://gourmetsleuth.com/vanilla.htm

"Artificial Vanilla Flavoring
U.S. manufactured artificial vanilla is produced from synthetic "vanillin", Lignin Vanillin, which is made from a by-product of the paper producing industry. This by product is chemically treated to mimic the flavor of vanilla. The product help take care of a ecological problem with paper producers and created an "affordable" vanilla flavoring for the public.

The other synthetic common in Mexican artificial flavorings is Ethyl Vanillin derived from coal tar. "

Actually I don't find this at all disturbing...Coal (and paper for that matter) are made up of formerly organic compounds, so it wouldn't surprise me if many of the byproducts of the processing of these items are technically edible if not tasty.

I remember a book out not to long ago, the name escapes me, discussing this common misunderstanding of chemicals, and the notion of "natural good" "Artificial bad" and More Chemicals = More Bad.

Some of the examples from the book that stick out in my memory included the fact that Natural Strawberry flavor had more chemicals than artificial strawberry flavor, and that artificial almond flavor was a dirivitive of peach pitts and contained arsenic.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 05 March 2007, 06:03 PM
Nick Theodorakis Nick Theodorakis is offline
 
Join Date: 05 November 2005
Location: Fishers, IN
Posts: 6,657
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BringTheNoise View Post
...
That's why all my vegetables are cloned in a sterile labratory!
It might amuse you to know that the word "clone" is derived from a word describing the process of propagating plants by grafting.

Quote:
I had imagined that the etymology of clone was a corruption of colony, but it is actually derived from the Greek, klon, meaning a twig or small branch. This etymology reveals the original use of the word clone to describe vegetative reproduction of plants by taking cuttings. Because higher plants, unlike animals, do not sequester a germline distinct from somatic cells, plant cells remain pluripotent; reproductive cloning of plants, for example potatoes, occurs naturally and has been practiced for millennia by horticulturists in the propagation of vines and fruit trees. The new plants derived from cuttings or grafts are genetically identical to the parent, and the term clone came to be used for any form of artificial, asexual means of replication.

Although the word clone was introduced botanically in 1903, the first use that I have found to describe replication from a single progenitor was in 1954 when Theodore T. Puck and colleagues cloned human cells in culture. However, the word clone did not appear in general dictionaries until later. My 1964 Oxford Concise Dictionary restricts the definition to “a group of plants reproduced vegetatively from one original seedling or stock,” whereas my wife’s 1992 Chambers Pocket Dictionary gives two meanings: (1) (anyone of) a group of identical organisms reproduced by a non-sexual process from a single cell of the parent; (2) (colloq. or derog.) a person or thing that looks like a replica of someone or something else. The “single-cell” restriction in Chambers implies that it no longer refers to vegetative propagation of plants.
cite:
Robin A. Weiss. "Robert Koch: The Grandfather of Cloning?" Cell:Volume 123, Issue 4 , 18 November 2005, Pages 539-542.

Avaliable here, but you may need an institutional subsciption to access it.

Nick
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 05 March 2007, 06:11 PM
snapdragonfly's Avatar
snapdragonfly snapdragonfly is offline
 
Join Date: 15 March 2006
Location: Texas
Posts: 10,731
Default

Scare tactics or not, they still taste like cellophane.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 05 March 2007, 07:35 PM
matches
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by snapdragonfly View Post
Scare tactics or not, they still taste like cellophane.
Which again, as it is derived from cellulose (at least what used to be called cellophane was) it is entirely edible (though indigestable).

However, I do like twinkies, when they are fresh...although they have a long shelf life, near their sell by date, you really don't get your monies worth.

IF you pick one up however, right after you see the stocker put them on the self, snatch em up, you'll find they tastes like a sticky sweet dream.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 05 March 2007, 08:23 PM
candy from strangers candy from strangers is offline
 
Join Date: 16 November 2005
Location: Illinois
Posts: 8,258
Default

I know this is a weird way of thinking, but Twinkies gross me out because to me they are the flavour version of the mysteriously sticky hands toddlers always have. A result of doing too much babysitting, I expect.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 05 March 2007, 11:19 PM
snapdragonfly's Avatar
snapdragonfly snapdragonfly is offline
 
Join Date: 15 March 2006
Location: Texas
Posts: 10,731
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by matches View Post
Which again, as it is derived from cellulose (at least what used to be called cellophane was) it is entirely edible (though indigestable).

However, I do like twinkies, when they are fresh...although they have a long shelf life, near their sell by date, you really don't get your monies worth.

IF you pick one up however, right after you see the stocker put them on the self, snatch em up, you'll find they tastes like a sticky sweet dream.
When my daughter was younger, we were at a birthday party and the cake was really cute - it was a sunflower, made of a one layer round chocolate cake covered in Kisses for the center, and Twinkies for the petals. Another mom and I said, "boy, those Twinkies look good, don't they?" (I hadn't had one since the Johnson administration.) The mom in charge said "oh, please, have one!" so we did...and then said to each other, "you know, these just...aren't that good."

Dunno if they weren't fresh or if I'm just a food snob. (Well, I am a food snob, so that could be it. Yes, I'm a food snob. I admit this ugly truth!)
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 06 March 2007, 03:28 AM
snopes's Avatar
snopes snopes is offline
 
Join Date: 18 February 2000
Location: California
Posts: 109,645
Icon23

Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 06 March 2007, 05:41 AM
Singing in the Drizzle Singing in the Drizzle is offline
 
Join Date: 24 November 2005
Location: Bellingham, WA
Posts: 4,745
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by snapdragonfly View Post
Blech. I've tasted spitballs that were better than Twinkies. Gross.

Now, on the other hand, I could be tempted with a Ding Dong...love that waxy chocolate.
Somewere I saw a waxy chocolate covered Twinkie. I do not remember what the name was. Would that make the Twinkie any better?
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 06 March 2007, 05:59 AM
Sylvanz's Avatar
Sylvanz Sylvanz is offline
 
Join Date: 23 June 2001
Location: Michigan
Posts: 7,950
Ponder

Twinkies always make me feel like my teeth are wearing furry little jackets, but I do love Ding Dongs.

P&LL, Syl
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 06 March 2007, 06:37 AM
Bryan With a 'Y''s Avatar
Bryan With a 'Y' Bryan With a 'Y' is offline
 
Join Date: 11 January 2007
Location: Anchorage, AK
Posts: 2,608
Teacher

Quote:
Originally Posted by BringTheNoise View Post
You could probably scare a few people by "deconstructing" an orange. Nothing but scare tactics.
To say nothing of the well known perils of dihydrogen oxide...
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 06 March 2007, 12:03 PM
rlobinske's Avatar
rlobinske rlobinske is offline
 
Join Date: 15 December 2005
Location: Florida
Posts: 645
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug4.7 View Post
Just because it is a "chemical" does not make it bad/good. You should see what goes on to make your morning sausage....
Mmmmm...sausage.

(Yes, I've made sausage, so I have an excellent idea of what goes into it.)
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 08:55 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.