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  #1  
Old 19 March 2009, 02:31 AM
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Icon104 Hotel credit card scam

Comment: I was wondering if this has really happened.

Credit Card Scam:

Beware of this scam!

You arrive at your hotel and check in at the front desk. When checking in,
you give the front desk your credit card (for all the charges for your
room). You get to your room and settle in. Someone calls the front desk
and asked for (example) Room 620 (which happens to be your room).

Your phone rings in your room. You answer and the person on the other end
says the following, 'This is the front desk. When checking in, we came
across a problem with your charge card information. Please re-read me your
credit card number and verify the last 3 digits numbers at the reverse
side of your charge card.'

Not thinking anything you might give this person your information,since
the call seems to come from the front desk. But actually, it is a scam of
someone calling from outside the hotel/front desk.

They ask for a random room number. Then, ask you for credit card
information and address information.Sounding so professional that you do
think you are talking to the front desk.

If you ever encounter this problem on your vacation, tell the caller that
you will be down at the front desk to clear up any problems. Then, go to
the front desk and ask if there was a problem. If there was none, inform
the manager of the hotel that someone called to scam you of your credit
card information acting like a front desk employee.

From a friend who has been duped.....and still clearing the mess....
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  #2  
Old 19 March 2009, 02:34 AM
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Ponder

One important thing the scammer would need to obtain is the guest's name, and I'd be rather suspicious if a hotel desk clerk had to ask me for that piece of information.

Also, the switchboards at many of the hotels I've stayed in lately won't put through calls to room numbers unless the caller can identify the last name of the guest the room is registered to.
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  #3  
Old 19 March 2009, 09:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snopes View Post
One important thing the scammer would need to obtain is the guest's name, and I'd be rather suspicious if a hotel desk clerk had to ask me for that piece of information.

Also, the switchboards at many of the hotels I've stayed in lately won't put through calls to room numbers unless the caller can identify the last name of the guest the room is registered to.
That was my first thought, and I've worked on hotel front desks for more years than i wish to remember.
People move rooms, or give out the wrong number to their office etc, so it is normal to ask for the name of the person you are calling if they haven't already volunteered the information.
Likewise, if someone asks for "Mr Browns room", we would often confirm the first name, in case there were more than one of that surname.

But basically, if anyone give out their credit card details to others over the phone, then they deserve what they get.
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  #4  
Old 19 March 2009, 01:18 PM
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chillas chillas is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snopes View Post
Not thinking anything you might give this person your information,since
the call seems to come from the front desk.
Well, there's your problem right there - not thinking.

I wouldn't go as far as saying that a victim of this scam (even if it exists, which is unlikely) deserves what they get, but it would be pretty stupid to fall for it.
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  #5  
Old 24 March 2009, 02:12 AM
fionapoulsen
 
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While it is unlikely it can happen on a large scale, it may happen on some hotels, maybe even with the help of the front desk officer or somebody from the inside.

Though it would be a stupid one.
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  #6  
Old 06 April 2009, 11:03 AM
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I was thinking about this and actually I can see part of it happening. At work, one of the types of outbound dialing we do is to people whose credit cards have declined. It could be any number of reasons -- not all having to do with their credit limit -- that it declined. It amazes me how often I will call someone and say that and they read me their new card number. A lot of the time, they received the new card because of fraud on the old number. Maybe one person a month will say that they prefer to call us so they know who they're talking to. But it's quite easy to get someone to give you their cred card number.

Or maybe I just sound (mostly) honest.
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  #7  
Old 06 April 2009, 11:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quiltsbypam View Post
I was thinking about this and actually I can see part of it happening. At work, one of the types of outbound dialing we do is to people whose credit cards have declined. It could be any number of reasons -- not all having to do with their credit limit -- that it declined. It amazes me how often I will call someone and say that and they read me their new card number. A lot of the time, they received the new card because of fraud on the old number. Maybe one person a month will say that they prefer to call us so they know who they're talking to. But it's quite easy to get someone to give you their cred card number.

Or maybe I just sound (mostly) honest.
So why are you still doing whatever it is you do for a living, instead of out there datamining and phishing between vacations in Tahiti? Get out there I say and discover your potential.
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  #8  
Old 06 April 2009, 11:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quiltsbypam View Post
Maybe one person a month will say that they prefer to call us so they know who they're talking to. But it's quite easy to get someone to give you their cred card number.

Or maybe I just sound (mostly) honest.
A bank official that rang me a few months ago got all uppity because I insisted on ringing her back before I divulged information. I'd spoken to her before and I sort of recognised her voice. But, I'm just very wary. One of my friends was caught out in a credit card scam in a restaurant and ended up over €5,000 in debt, which took a while to clear up.
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  #9  
Old 06 April 2009, 12:29 PM
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When my dad came out of hospital for the first time last year he was rung up late at night by someone claiming to be from his bank. The person said they had noticed something strange about the use of dad's debit card. The man asked for dad's debit card number, security code, bank account number, full name, address, date of birth, etc, etc... I was shocked that dad would give so much information to someone over the phone. 'But they did say that I had spent £53.74 at the Co-Op yesterday,' he said.

I said that they could have found a dropped receipt as dad was leaving the supermarket and either recognised dad (the store was in a small town) or noted dad's car number, used it to find an address and so on. I rang the security number on dad's bank statement and discovered it was a genuine call. They were suspicious because the card had not been used for three months and then had been used three times in two days. They had not told dad this. They said they asked all these questions for security reasons so that they knew they were talking to the right person. I just felt they should have done more to identify themselves to make sure that dad knew who he was talking to.
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  #10  
Old 06 April 2009, 01:13 PM
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With calls purporting to be from the hotel reception I'd just say "I'll come down". With those purporting to be from my bank I tell them "I'll come in and see you" or "I'll ring back on the customer service number, who should I ask for?".
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  #11  
Old 06 April 2009, 01:22 PM
Troberg Troberg is offline
 
 
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Whenever there is a problem when I'm staying at a hotel, I always go to the front desk and resolve it face to face. It would stop this kind of scams, but the main reason is that I've found that it's a much more efficient way of getting something done. It's simply much harder to say "no" to someone face to face, and you get the correct person quicker.
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  #12  
Old 06 April 2009, 01:24 PM
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Wolf

Quote:
Originally Posted by snopes View Post
One important thing the scammer would need to obtain is the guest's name, and I'd be rather suspicious if a hotel desk clerk had to ask me for that piece of information.
"and just to confirm, could you read me the name on the card as it is printed?"

This wouldn't sound off to me. My card could have my middle initial or suffix (Jr. or III or whatever) which I never use. So I'd tell the Clerk that I'm Demon Wolf, but my card may read "Demon Q Wolf IX."

Quote:
Originally Posted by llewtrah View Post
With calls purporting to be from the hotel reception I'd just say "I'll come down". With those purporting to be from my bank I tell them "I'll come in and see you" or "I'll ring back on the customer service number, who should I ask for?".
IMO, this is the safest method.
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  #13  
Old 06 April 2009, 01:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddylizard View Post
So why are you still doing whatever it is you do for a living, instead of out there datamining and phishing between vacations in Tahiti? Get out there I say and discover your potential.
Uh, well... it's 'cause I look awful in a swimsuit.

Oh, and that damnable conscience.

Quote:
Originally Posted by llewtrah View Post
With calls purporting to be from the hotel reception I'd just say "I'll come down". With those purporting to be from my bank I tell them "I'll come in and see you" or "I'll ring back on the customer service number, who should I ask for?".
Exactly. If a customer tells me they prefer to call back, I applaud it. That's really the safest thing. The automated system when people call in can be a bit of a pain, but it's hella better than just giving out important info like that over the phone.
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  #14  
Old 11 April 2009, 03:05 PM
Ameridebi
 
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I worked at the front desk of a rather low-budget motel for a couple of years, and I would be more concerned with customers scamming the hotel than outsiders scamming the customers! They would give me cards with other people's names, claiming they were 'right outside,' but absolutely couldn't sign, they would have a wallet full of cards that would decline, try to get cash back when someone else paid for their room... etc.

That being said, we were supposed to always ask for the name of the guest before putting a call through. I would, because not only is it a security measure, but half the time they have the wrong room, which would just lead to an angry guest that I would have to deal with. However, my co-workers would just send calls along because they couldn't be bothered to check. This scam would have worked just fine if they called when my co-workers were there, and reached some of our older, more confused, or less sober clientele.
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  #15  
Old 28 August 2009, 04:36 PM
Azzizi
 
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I think the original post is feasible. Not every hotel employee is dilligent or even cares.

I've made purchases over the internet with credit cards and had someone call me to verify that I made the purchase. This happened when I would enter a shipping address different from my billing address. When they confirmed my identity, they didn't ask for credit card numbers or anything that could be used to make an additional purchase. Instead, they would say, Did you make a purchase in the amount of $1,752.19 from X Computer Company?" After I answered, they would ask something like, "Which of the following addresses have you previously owned?" followed by a list of addresses. They'd ask a few more random, but very specific questions, but nothing that required me to initiate giving any information.
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