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Old 25 January 2009, 10:58 PM
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Default Effects of a rattlesnake bite

Full Article and Pictures (Graphic, Probably Not Safe For Work) at
http://www.eyecatchypics.com/2008/10...tlesnake-bite/

Quote:
On July 21, 2002, just after my 13th birthday, I was bitten by a Northern Pacific rattlesnake (the snake was originally identified as a Western Diamondback rattlesnake, but that species is not found near Yosemite). I was located on a trail in a hiking area near Yosemite National Park, California. The bite occurred when I was sitting on a small boulder at a distance of 4.5 miles from the trailhead with my cabin group at camp. I had my arms dangling at my side, and a 5 foot long rattlesnake bit me in the middle of my left palm.
Now while I don't doubt the overall basic story, I think this might be in the same category as the old "Brown Recluse Spider Bite" series of pictures that is floating around the internet in that is does show the effects of a rattlesnake bite, but shows a very much worst case scenario of it. While rattlesnake and other vipers have a hemotoxic venom (unlike members of the Cobra family that have a much more deadly but much less dramatic looking neurotoxin) that is capable of causing severe tissue damage, I don't think most average rattlesnake bites do this much soft tissue damage.
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Old 25 January 2009, 11:24 PM
Ryda Wong, EBfCo. Ryda Wong, EBfCo. is offline
 
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Well, it was a child, and it did take a while to get to medical services, according to the narrative.

Last night, I watched a documentary on the work of photgrapher Shelby Lee Adams. One of his subjects was of the snake handler sect. He was bitten, and, prior to that, had asked Adams to document it if ever he was bitten. The amount of tissue damage was overwhelming, and he was a grown man.

I can't find it right now, but I'll look.
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Old 25 January 2009, 11:24 PM
tribrats tribrats is offline
 
 
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Not sure about others but I'm unable to load the page because I get a maleware warning from my antivirus stuff.
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Old 26 January 2009, 02:18 AM
Jay Tea Jay Tea is offline
 
 
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Ponder

It's all down to the type of bite and the speed of treatment. A good chaw by a rattler (and a good dose of venom released into the flesh and vessels) can feck you up royally in terms of tissue damage if you're not seen too sharpish, and even then you can rupture extremities, even limbs - infection is a cruel, late arriving mistress.

Most rattler bites will be marked down as nibbles, with very little venom involved as they tend to save it when merely defending themselves, but spook one badly or tread in it's bush and you'll get tagged badly - i've personally seen pit viper bites take a very nasty turn and one guy's foot (Central America) I saw easily matches some of the images in the link, if to a lesser extent.
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Old 26 January 2009, 02:20 AM
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Originally Posted by tribrats View Post
Not sure about others but I'm unable to load the page because I get a maleware warning from my antivirus stuff.
"Warning: this site may cause your computer to belch in public, obsess over abstract concepts such as "point spreads," and focus its webcam at chest-level when you attempt to interface with it..."

(I got the malware warning from Google, too.)
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Old 26 January 2009, 04:01 PM
tribrats tribrats is offline
 
 
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Frying Pan

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Originally Posted by musicgeek View Post
"Warning: this site may cause your computer to belch in public, obsess over abstract concepts such as "point spreads," and focus its webcam at chest-level when you attempt to interface with it..."

(I got the malware warning from Google, too.)



Oops!
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  #7  
Old 26 January 2009, 04:05 PM
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Tweetilynn Tweetilynn is offline
 
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much of that looks like where the doctor's probably did a cut in order to keep the arm from rupturing on it's own. My only cite is that I watch way too much of stuff like Venom ER.
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Old 26 January 2009, 04:06 PM
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There's something wrong with that site. I got a virus warning too. You have a clean copy somewhere?
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Old 26 January 2009, 04:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mama Duck View Post
There's something wrong with that site. I got a virus warning too. You have a clean copy somewhere?
www.rattlesnakebite.org/
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  #10  
Old 26 January 2009, 07:39 PM
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We had an expert from the zoo discuss the healing potential as well as the dangers of venom in Philly. It was nifty. She also used these pictures and talked about what happened.

Quote:
much of that looks like where the doctor's probably did a cut in order to keep the arm from rupturing on it's own. My only cite is that I watch way too much of stuff like Venom ER.
I think you are right. from the site:
Quote:
At the UC Davis hospital I underwent a fasciotomy, which involved the doctors cutting open my arm from the palm up to about the middle of my biceps. This was to relieve the extreme pressure that had built up in my arm from the rattlesnake venom, making my arm as hard as a rock until the fasciotomy.
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  #11  
Old 26 January 2009, 07:55 PM
NotQuitePokey
 
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Could it be that she had what I think is called compartment syndrome.
http://www.kingsnake.com/snakegetter...snakebite.html

Quote:
Fasciotomy and compartment syndrome

The "old school" method of treating snake bite involved physical surgery. Modern researchers have since discovered more effective ways to medically manage envenomations without invasive physical trauma, but because snake bite is such a rare occurrence, the average doctor will not be up to date in this field, and the average hospital will still be working from treatment protocols that do not take these recent changes into account. True compartment syndrome is considered rare in a properly managed envenomation where sufficient antivenom is administered - but the effects of envenomation may be difficult to distinguish from compartment syndrome, leading the doctor to perform an inappropriate fasciotomy.
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  #12  
Old 26 January 2009, 08:00 PM
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Mama Duck Mama Duck is offline
 
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It's all very plausible the way it's laid out. You're right though. This is "worst case scenario". There is always some nerve damage/tissue death with rattlesnake bites, they're usually not that severe. Much of the damage was inflicted because the necessary medical treatments. Better to knowingly cause nerve/tissue damage than to wait and see if gangrene sets in. Also, treatments of antivenin helps most patients before fasciotomies become necessary. But antivenin doesn't work on everyone.
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