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  #41  
Old 01 December 2008, 02:14 PM
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Floater Floater is offline
 
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Glasses

I can't see any reason at all to smash the windows in the case that Fanatic provided photos of. They could just as easily have placed the hose across the bonnet.
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  #42  
Old 01 December 2008, 02:47 PM
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DemonWolf DemonWolf is offline
 
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Wolf

Quote:
Originally Posted by Atlanta Jake View Post
I do not know what the outcome was, but I do know that before he left the scene, the Chief gave him a "claim for damages form" to file a claim against the city! If I was the Chief, I would have had him arrested for damaging City property, hindering emergency operations and endangering firefighter's lives (it interrupted water supply to the operating Engine, causing the operation to be halted and all personnel withdrawn).
Handing the guy the form was probably less time consuming than explaining to him that he was SOL. I would think that the chief had higher priorities than discussing the driver's automotive woes.

Besides, just because you filled out a form doesn't mean that the request will be granted.
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  #43  
Old 07 December 2008, 05:50 PM
Toxic Sadness
 
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Fight

Coming from a family of fire fighters....This picture doesn't surprise me one bit that it would be real.
Well, that person will think twice before parking in front of a fire hydrant again LOL
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  #44  
Old 22 December 2010, 01:22 AM
hornetd
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Floater View Post
I can't see any reason at all to smash the windows in the case that Fanatic provided photos of. They could just as easily have placed the hose across the bonnet.
Being unsure of which photograph you are referring to let me try to give you an overview of what is going through a Fire Fighter's (FF) mind when they are serving as the layout person on an "engine company."

An "Engine Company" is the traditional name for the crew of a Tripple Combination Pumper here. A tripple combination pumper combines the functions of a tank wagon; or water tender in more modern terminology; a pumping apparatus, and a hose wagon. Be aware that in Europe and other parts of the world outside of North America, that particular piece of mobile fire equipment might be called by a different name such as a "pumping appliance." Engines in North American parlance are the vehicles that are built, equipped and staffed to actually apply water to the fire. This is in contrast with "Ladder Trucks" that provide the engineering support functions such as forcible entry, ventilation, interior search, and access to upper floors and the roof by means of manually or mechanically raised ladders, and so forth. There are several other types of vehicles used but those two are the real workhorses in most cities here.

The Layout FF has to get water to the engine to support the initial attack that will secure the pathway to conduct an interior search for trapped or
incapacitated victims!

Lets take a look at what kind of time the Layout FF has to accomplish that job. The point at which Flash-over will occur and endanger FFs in and near the compartment of origin of the fire will be in roughly ten minutes from when the fire ignition occurred in a residential furnished room. Flash over is the phenomenon that occurs when the heat from the fire has raised the temperature of the interior of the room to were it will not absorb the heat as fast as it is being produced and thus will reflect much of that heat back into the compartment. When that point is reached the entire interior of the room will ignite with explosive speed. Even a FF in a complete protective ensemble is in deadly danger when this occurs and will have only seconds to escape death. Some serious injury is inevitable to a FF so exposed.

Out of that ten minutes five will have been used in discovery, alarm, alerting responding units, crew turnout, and travel to the fire scene. We now have a maximum of five minutes left until flash-over. In many fire departments / brigades the attack will commence as soon as the first attack line is stretched and the interior attack crew will be dependent on the Layout FF and the pump operator for supplying water before the water in the tank is exhausted. They will commit themselves to holding an escape and rescue pathway open, so that the truck crew can conduct an interior search, using the water in the attack engines tank. They are depending on their colleagues to establish a continuous supply before that five hundred gallons / eighteen hundred liters to one thousand gallons / 3600 liters of water is gone. The standard minimum initial attack fire flow in American practice is one hundred fifty gallons / five hundred seventy liters a minute. At that flow the tank water will last from three to seven minutes. Five hundred is the most common tank size in use because water is so heavy that larger tanks tend to limit the other equipment that an engine can carry or push the size of the vehicle up to an unwieldy level.

Your colleagues, that you work with every working day, are now dependent on you, as the layout FF, to get the additional water to them on time. Nobody will notice if you used the most efficient pathway for the hose or did the least possible damage to a vehicle that is between you and the water that will secure your comrads safety. They will never forget and will find it hard to forgive if that water supply is late. The engine crew won't abandon the truck crew searching the floor above the fire so they will play the stream until the water is gone. Under the mental pressure of those facts I think we should all cut the layout fire fighter a little slack for not taking any extra time to get water.

Hindsight will always be 20/20.
--
Yours in Service
Fire Fighter Tom Horne
Speaking only for himself.
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  #45  
Old 22 December 2010, 02:07 PM
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Gutter Monkey Gutter Monkey is offline
 
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Flame

I found a few more:






The firemen of the city of Mary Esther seem rather pleased with that last photo, they've even put it up on their own website.
http://www.cityofmaryesther.com/Fire...iceTrivia.html

Quote:
Originally Posted by Atlanta Jake View Post
Even so, I have personally seen a car drive down a road that was completely blocked by 5" supply line, not paying attention (actually, he was gawking at the building on fire instead of watching the road), hit the hose at a coupling destroying the coupling and disabling the vehicle. The driver got out of the car, cursed out the Chief and demanded to know who was going to fix his car!
You're gonna love this video:



Quote:
Originally Posted by hornetd View Post
Yours in Service
Fire Fighter Tom Horne
Speaking only for himself.
I've only got one thing to say to people like you:

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  #46  
Old 22 December 2010, 04:42 PM
Dr. Winston O'Boogie's Avatar
Dr. Winston O'Boogie Dr. Winston O'Boogie is offline
 
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Location: Fox Lake, IL
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by hornetd View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Floater View Post
I can't see any reason at all to smash the windows in the case that Fanatic provided photos of. They could just as easily have placed the hose across the bonnet.
Being unsure of which photograph you are referring to....
She was referring to this post:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fanatic View Post
From this page, another picture of the BMW incident:

(Images snipped per snopes' request)

Large diameter supply lines need lots of room. Going under the car may result in a broken hose. The fire department is more concerned with getting the line hooked up and water flowing as quickly as possible; they aren't going to want to take time to survey the situation, pull extra hose, etc. to make a connection that accommodates some doofus who parks on a red curb.

Danny Barlogio's pictures have probably prevented a lot of blocked hydrants over the years!
I kinda agree - wouldn't it have been quicker to throw the hoses over the hood of the car than break two windows and fish the hose through the car? Add to that the hose going over broken glass, and that it looks like the hose has to take a pretty severe turn to go through the car - more than it would have taken to go over the hood - does seem to imply the firemen wanted to make a point to an asshat who parked in front of a hydrant rather than that being the quickest way to get water to the fire.

That being said, the asshat who parked in front of the hydrant deserves having his windows broken.
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  #47  
Old 22 December 2010, 05:54 PM
overyonder overyonder is offline
 
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Location: Charlotte, NC
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Default

You still need a clear line to the hydrant. Over the hood or over the roof would also damage the paint dramatically from the friction of the house while under pressure (it vibrates).

The side windows of cars are tempered. When they break, they fall into very small pieces that aren't all that sharp, compared to a non-tempered glass.

Tempered glass:


Non-tempered glass:


OY
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  #48  
Old 22 December 2010, 05:58 PM
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A Turtle Named Mack A Turtle Named Mack is offline
 
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Location: Marietta, GA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gutter Monkey View Post
I found a few more:
The minivan in the first three does not seem to have any broken glass around it. If the windows were already open, I would definitely endorse this route, as better securing the high pressure hose, less likely to kink, doing no damage to the car, and leaving absolutely no chance that the owner will drive off causing damage to the hose.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gutter Monkey View Post
I've only got one thing to say to people like you:
Seconded.

And same to AtlantaJake - sorry you feel under-appreciated, although I have to agree that the City itself is rather quick to lop firefighter and police positions and pay, rather than about anything else.
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  #49  
Old 22 December 2010, 06:02 PM
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NorthernLite NorthernLite is offline
 
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Moose

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Winston O'Boogie View Post
She was referring to this post:

I kinda agree - wouldn't it have been quicker to throw the hoses over the hood of the car than break two windows and fish the hose through the car?
I would also think that it would be faster going over the top of a vehicle or across the hood. Plus you could tell the a44hat that if he moves his vehicle before the fire is under control that he could be charged with interfering with the firefighters. Plus if you do it right it would cost him more to repair the scratches and dings from dragging the hoses over his vehicle.
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  #50  
Old 22 December 2010, 10:07 PM
hornetd
 
Posts: n/a
Flame

Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthernLite View Post
I would also think that it would be faster going over the top of a vehicle or across the hood. Plus you could tell the a44hat that if he moves his vehicle before the fire is under control that he could be charged with interfering with the firefighters. Plus if you do it right it would cost him more to repair the scratches and dings from dragging the hoses over his vehicle.
But that is my point folks. We are not worried about what will do more or the least damage, although it is true that glass is about the least expensive part of the vehicle. You figure out a way any way to get water and you execute on that plan. In firefighting General Patton's words are truly borne out in that the perfect is the enemy of the good. If you have a way to get water that looks like it may work you do it. There simply isn't time for second guessing yourself.

--
Fire Fighter Tom Horne
Speaking only for himself
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  #51  
Old 22 December 2010, 10:19 PM
hornetd
 
Posts: n/a
Flame

Quote:
Originally Posted by A Turtle Named Mack View Post
The minivan in the first three does not seem to have any broken glass around it. If the windows were already open, I would definitely endorse this route, as better securing the high pressure hose, less likely to kink, doing no damage to the car, and leaving absolutely no chance that the owner will drive off causing damage to the hose.
I cannot be sure do to the angle from which the photograph was taken but it would appear that the best route through the mini van would have been to open the doors and run it through the vehicle at seat level. Less chance of a kink that way. That also would have been the best way through the Beamer by the looks of things.
--
Yours in Service
Fire Fighter Tom Horne
Speaking only for himself


Quote:
Seconded.

And same to AtlantaJake - sorry you feel under-appreciated, although I have to agree that the City itself is rather quick to lop firefighter and police positions and pay, rather than about anything else.
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  #52  
Old 11 April 2014, 01:49 AM
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A Turtle Named Mack A Turtle Named Mack is offline
 
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Location: Marietta, GA
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Neener, Neener For BMW at East Boston fire scene, blocking hydrant proves costly

At the most dangerous point during what became an eight-alarm fire in East Boston Wednesday night, Boston firefighters scrambling to get water to their colleagues ran into a barrier: Someone had parked a BMW coupe in front of the hydrant near the blaze. So they punched out the windows, ran a 4-inch hose from the hydrant through the driverís side window, through the passengerís side window, and out to an engine waiting to pump water to firefighters directly engaged in quelling a powerful fire threatening the neighborhood.

http://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/201...S8L/story.html
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