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  #1  
Old 23 January 2007, 07:38 PM
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black roses19 black roses19 is offline
 
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Default Water is bad; drink more alcohol!

I swear I saw this on the old board, but couldn't find it. Chow if necessary.

Quote:
WATER...... IT HAS BEEN SCIENTIFICALLY PROVEN THAT IF WE DRANK 1 LITER OF WATER EACH DAY, AT THE END OF THE YEAR WE WOULD HAVE ABSORBED MORE THAN 1 KILO OF ESCHERICHIA COLI BACTERIA FOUND IN FECES, IN OTHER WORDS, WE ARE CONSUMING 2 LBS. OF POOP EACH YEAR!

HOWEVER, WE DON'T RUN THAT RISK WHEN DRINKING WINE, RUM, WHISKEY, VODKA, BEER OR OTHER LIQUORS, BECAUSE ALCOHOL HAS TO GO THROUGH A DISTILLATION PROCESS OF BOILING, FILTERING AND FERMENTING.

WATER = POOP
BOOZE = HEALTH

FREE YOURSELF OF POOP, DRINK BOOZE !!!

IT'S BETTER TO DRINK BOOZE AND FEEL LIKE SHIT THAN DRINK WATER AND BE FULL OF SHIT.

THERE'S NO NEED TO THANK ME FOR THIS VALUABLE INFORMATION, I'M DOING IT AS A PUBLIC SERVICE .

YOU'RE WELCOME...
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  #2  
Old 23 January 2007, 07:40 PM
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Tarquin Farquart Tarquin Farquart is offline
 
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Tea would also be ok.
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  #3  
Old 23 January 2007, 07:48 PM
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How would tea be ok? No distilling there, unless you mean this tea.
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  #4  
Old 23 January 2007, 07:49 PM
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Tarquin Farquart Tarquin Farquart is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geminilee View Post
How would tea be ok? No distilling there, unless you mean this tea.
Well beer and wine aren't distilled either. I would have thought the boiling would be sufficient. Although drinking "that tea" would be fine
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  #5  
Old 23 January 2007, 08:13 PM
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A kilo of bacteria? That's gotta be a whole lotta bacteria!
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  #6  
Old 23 January 2007, 09:30 PM
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Sister Ray Sister Ray is offline
 
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This seems like a spoof e-mail to me.

Sister "although it is nice to see something that says water isn't perfect" Ray
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  #7  
Old 23 January 2007, 11:55 PM
bjohn13
 
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I'm a fan of distilled water, myself. Every year, my city sends out a pamphlet detailing exactly what is in our tap water. It doesn't seem like a whole lot when they say that 1.7% of our drinking water is impurities, but when you actually take that 1.7% out and look at it, it really speaks volumes.

So, what exactly is that 1.7% of our local drinking water made out of?

-Inorganic mineral deposits (like copper, lead, rust, and any non-humous dirt)
-Organic material (like algae, dead skin, and, yes, feces)
-Agricultural chemicals (Pesticides and fertilizers)
-Radioactive waste (this one is unexplainable)
-Chlorine (supposed to make our water "cleaner")
-Fluoride (supposed to keep our teeth healthy).

There are nutrients in our drinking water that are essential to our health, but even someone like me who regularly uses more than a gallon of water a day between drinking and cooking is only going to get trace amounts from tap water. Besides, I'd like to see someone eat the sludge that ends up at the bottom of my water distiller because it's a good source of Magnesium and Calcium.

The pros and cons of distilled and overly treated water have been argued at length with no real proof either way. My thought is, I'd rather not take any chances with something I consume so much of.

The following is an excellent link. It doesn't really support or deny my opinion, but it does give a reader enough information to make an informed decision on what to drink.

http://tinyurl.com/2bjsg4
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  #8  
Old 24 January 2007, 04:30 AM
Singing in the Drizzle Singing in the Drizzle is offline
 
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Radioactive was is not unexpective. As the materals of our world brake down they give off a little bit of radiation. Not to mention water is the universal solvent. We can detect the radioactive materal in even at very low levels.
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  #9  
Old 24 January 2007, 05:06 AM
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Quote:
IT'S BETTER TO DRINK BOOZE AND FEEL LIKE SHIT THAN DRINK WATER AND BE FULL OF SHIT.
(Emphasis mine.) This line seemed particularly tongue-in-cheek.
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  #10  
Old 24 January 2007, 07:14 AM
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Sister Ray Sister Ray is offline
 
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Spit Take

Quote:
Originally Posted by bjohn13 View Post
I'm a fan of distilled water, myself. Every year, my city sends out a pamphlet detailing exactly what is in our tap water. It doesn't seem like a whole lot when they say that 1.7% of our drinking water is impurities, but when you actually take that 1.7% out and look at it, it really speaks volumes.

So, what exactly is that 1.7% of our local drinking water made out of?

-Inorganic mineral deposits (like copper, lead, rust, and any non-humous dirt)
-Organic material (like algae, dead skin, and, yes, feces)
-Agricultural chemicals (Pesticides and fertilizers)
-Radioactive waste (this one is unexplainable)
-Chlorine (supposed to make our water "cleaner")
-Fluoride (supposed to keep our teeth healthy).
Copper is an essential trace element. And what are you measuring as the 1.7 percent? If that's the entire drinkable water supply, than you're still not going to be having a lot. And anyway, humans shed skin enough that it's probably all over the house anyway, and drinking some more isn't going to kill you.

Sister "and is human skin even bad for you? what's in it?" Ray
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  #11  
Old 24 January 2007, 08:53 AM
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Richard W Richard W is offline
 
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It's not a completely absurd idea - beer and ale used to be staple drinks for essentially this reason. As Tarquin said, they were gradually replaced by tea between the 17th and 19th century, and then by clean drinking water.

To claim that it's necessary in the modern UK at least is a joke, though.
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  #12  
Old 24 January 2007, 09:36 AM
PrometheusX303
 
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I'd like to see the documents for this one. Then again, I've never seen a "warning" message that DID document it's claims.

Just how does 1 kilo of E. Coli = 2 lbs of feces anyway?
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  #13  
Old 24 January 2007, 09:41 AM
Jay Tea Jay Tea is offline
 
 
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Eh - preaching to the converted here.

This all reminds me of the Chiltern Hills Spring water debacle - floods brought local sewage systems to chaos and the local spring water company was selling bottles riddled with fecal coliforms for weeks before anybody noticed - made me laugh, I drink Buxton
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  #14  
Old 24 January 2007, 07:59 PM
Iludium Phosdex
 
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Spit Take What about bottled mineral water?

Quote:
Originally Posted by black roses19 View Post
I swear I saw this on the old board, but couldn't find it. Chow if necessary.
From what I understand, the Europeans (the French especially) are major consumers of bottled mineral water.

As in the likes of such brands as Perrier, Evian, Vittel, Contrexeville, Vichy Celestins, Spa Monopole (from Belgium), Ferrarelle and San Pellegrino (from Italy), Ramlosa (from Sweden) and, from Germany, Apollonaris, Gerolsteiner and Black Forest.

Why could that be?
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  #15  
Old 25 January 2007, 05:40 AM
bjohn13
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sister Ray View Post
Copper is an essential trace element. And what are you measuring as the 1.7 percent? If that's the entire drinkable water supply, than you're still not going to be having a lot. And anyway, humans shed skin enough that it's probably all over the house anyway, and drinking some more isn't going to kill you.

Sister "and is human skin even bad for you? what's in it?" Ray
1.7% of the substance that composes the water we get out of our tap is not water. Yes, that's a miniscule amount, but I tried to word my post in an objective way because I feel that people should know more about their water supplies. At the same time, I didn't want to make it sound like I thought the sky was falling.

I drink and cook with distilled water because I love the taste, and I don't get evaporation lines on my cookware and glasses. I also believe that it has health benefits over drinking most cities' tap water (notice that I did not say "all" cities' tap water), but I have no way of substantiating that. I can, however, see that my tap water leaves ferrous oxide stains on my sinks, toilets, and tubs, and it's a pretty convicing argument.

Someone who believes that tap water is healthier really has no way of substantiating that claim either. Tons of studies have been done on drinking water over the years, but the only real conclusive finding is that people who use drinking water with a higher amount of magnesium in it (many times inserted artificially by treating the water with limestone) tend to have a lesser risk of heart disease*. I believe that is a good thing, but for someone like me who gets an adequate supply of magnesium (and any other nutrient that might be in our drinking water) from my daily diet, the benefit I get from it being in my water is nonexistant.

I'm not going to sit here and say that drinking tap water is bad for your health, as that is obviously not always the case. I do, however, believe that a good defense can be made in support of drinking exclusively distilled water...especially for someone like me who simply cannot stomach the taste or the smell of most tapwater.

*I provided a link in my previous post that documents this.

b "25 cents a gallon" john13
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  #16  
Old 25 January 2007, 09:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Iludium Phosdex View Post
From what I understand, the Europeans (the French especially) are major consumers of bottled mineral water.

As in the likes of such brands as Perrier, Evian, Vittel, Contrexeville, Vichy Celestins, Spa Monopole (from Belgium), Ferrarelle and San Pellegrino (from Italy), Ramlosa (from Sweden) and, from Germany, Apollonaris, Gerolsteiner and Black Forest.

Why could that be?
Chlorine and chlorine dioxide in tap water

I'd say this is the main reason.
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  #17  
Old 25 January 2007, 08:05 PM
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Darth Credence Darth Credence is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bjohn13 View Post
I'm a fan of distilled water, myself. Every year, my city sends out a pamphlet detailing exactly what is in our tap water. It doesn't seem like a whole lot when they say that 1.7% of our drinking water is impurities, but when you actually take that 1.7% out and look at it, it really speaks volumes.
I have to believe that 1.7% is incorrect. All of the standards I've seen for drinking water from the EPA are in the parts per million range. In order to hit 1.7%, all those parts per million would have to add up to 17,000. I imagine that would be way out of compliance. Your link refers to high salinity water as anything from 1000 ppm to 40,000 ppm.
Not intending to be rude, but wondering where you got the 1.7% figure from.
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  #18  
Old 25 January 2007, 08:18 PM
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Sister Ray Sister Ray is offline
 
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I suppose if you had up a billion small parts, it might make 1.7. And if it's what comes out of the tap, it makes sense to run it longer and just dump some of the water.

Sister "or is that circular logic?" Ray
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  #19  
Old 26 January 2007, 11:29 PM
bjohn13
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darth Credence View Post
I have to believe that 1.7% is incorrect. All of the standards I've seen for drinking water from the EPA are in the parts per million range. In order to hit 1.7%, all those parts per million would have to add up to 17,000. I imagine that would be way out of compliance. Your link refers to high salinity water as anything from 1000 ppm to 40,000 ppm.
Not intending to be rude, but wondering where you got the 1.7% figure from.
Gasses trapped in the water are also included in that 1.7% figure that is cited in a pamphlet my city sends out once a year to all residents with a mailing address.

Last night, I cleaned my distiller (rinsing it several times with distilled water). I then distilled a gallon of water. After I was done, I scraped the inside of the distiller as best as I could trying to capture and measure the substance that was left behind. That is difficult to do, as I always end up with a thick layer of powder that coats the outside edge. I'm sure I lost a sizable quantity trying to measure, but I still ended up with close to a tablespoon of very fine powder left over.

Now, I've never been able to understand American measurements, so what percent of a gallon is a tablesppon? And how much gas would we have to add to the water in order to reach 1.7%?

When I fill my fill my distiller up to the one gallon fill line and then seal it and let it sit for a couple of hours, the top line of the water will be noticably below the fill line (at least a millimeter above the topmost point where the water climbs the inside edge).

b "not exactly a scientist, but I learned about them in high school" john13
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  #20  
Old 28 January 2007, 03:30 AM
Marie19
 
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See, this is exactly why my mom tells me "if it tastes good, eat it" (or drink it), and not to think/worry about what could/might be in it! Now I'm going to be freaking out over what might be in my cheap bottled water. *shivers*
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