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Old 11 November 2007, 03:25 AM
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Not_Done_Living Not_Done_Living is offline
 
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Default Power a TV with "AAA" battery?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0rA-zhTJuFU


I could maybe see this working for 5 seconds.. or less.. maybe..


can any engineers/electricians out there confirm?
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Old 11 November 2007, 03:47 AM
Singing in the Drizzle Singing in the Drizzle is offline
 
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I have see TV powered off a car battery or two. They also use an inverter to create AC current. If a AA battery was really able to power a TV it would get very hot hand go dead very quickly. The other problem is batteries are DC and large TVs require AC power. These 2 things are not compatible.

Some problems with the video. How the hell do you attach the positive end of the battery to the RCA cable that is spread and get a good connection. In a RCA cable there are two wires one connect the two outside end and the other connects the two inside prongs. He plugs the to prongs into the power cord and if you remember the prongs at the other end were removed how is the circuit completed. We also never see if the power cord is connected to the TV only that it come out from behind it. The power cord also a little small for a TV purched in the last 20 years.
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Old 11 November 2007, 03:51 AM
Doug4.7
 
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Seems like such a Rube Goldberg way of getting the battery power to the TV. Note, we have a 12V TV we use in our camper. From what I remember of its power drain, a single AAA battery would not last long at all.
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Old 11 November 2007, 04:07 AM
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musicgeek musicgeek is offline
 
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Another fool's errand.

Nevermind how long a battery would last - the battery generates 1.5 volts DC. The TV works on 110 V AC. Even if the wall power is stepped down and the TV can run on less, that conversion would happen inside the TV in the power supply. Attaching a battery at the plug end would only result in the battery voltage being stepped down further.
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Old 11 November 2007, 04:11 AM
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Richard W Richard W is offline
 
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Well, technically I guess they're right (eta - for certain values of "right") - it's just a way to connect a battery to the power input; however I doubt that a triple-A battery has enough energy even to start up a cathode ray TV. It would be more convincing if it had been a flat-screen LCD... but even then, the power input would take AC rather than DC surely, as Singing in The Drizzle said?
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Old 11 November 2007, 04:20 AM
Troberg Troberg is offline
 
 
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Quote:
If a AA battery was really able to power a TV it would get very hot hand go dead very quickly. The other problem is batteries are DC and large TVs require AC power. These 2 things are not compatible.
Not necessarily, I've seen TV's that has a rectifier directly on the input, turning the AC to DC, then chops up the DC into a higher frequency AC in order to be able to use a smaller transformer.

Still, an AAA battery would not have the power to last long.

The showstopper is not in these things, they could, under special circumstances and for a short while be overcome. The showstopper is that nothing in a TV made for 220V or 110V or even 12V is designed to be able to run on 1.5V. It will just not work.

Also, look at how he connects the battery. He will not get a connection to the positive pole that way. And he breaks off the center pin and uses the outer shield "pins" to make the connection to the battery, yet at the other end of the cable, he connects using the center pin.

This is soooooo fake.
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Old 11 November 2007, 04:24 AM
Troberg Troberg is offline
 
 
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One more thing. Let's just assume that it was possible, despite my comments above. A TV draws maybe 0.5A (peak) or something like that in 220V. That means 1A in 110V. That means that we are talking about something like 70A in 1.5V, and I've yet to see any small battery technology capable of delivering more than a few Ampere. Also, there is no way an ordinary RCA cable can handle 70A.
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Old 11 November 2007, 01:22 PM
Insensible Crier Insensible Crier is offline
 
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No way in the world this would work for many of the reasons listed above. Also with poor connections between the battery and the cable and the cable to the TV you are going to lose a lot of the tiny amount of your power, which is 1.5 volts and about 1 amp. This could barely power a small light bulb. No way in hell it would have enough for a 17-19 inch CRT like in the video. Plus that's ignoring the DC to AC problem that musicgeek mentioned.
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