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  #201  
Old 18 December 2018, 06:25 PM
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1. In England, "skittles" is not a candy but an early form of what popular modern sport? bowling

2. The first oil rush in U.S. history began in 1859 in what northeastern state? Pennsylvania

3. What word, did the Greek from "force" or "power," did Michael Faraday coin for the electrical generator he invented? dynamo?

4. The 1970s NBC series Night Gallery was created by a TV legend better known for what similar 1960s show? The Twilight Zone

5. Little Black Stretchy Pants is a new tell-all book about the 1998 founding of what company? WAG-Lululemon?

6. What stage musical's songs include "The Lusty Month of May" and "Guenevere"? Camelot

7. What unusual distinction is shared by all these famous people? Billy the Kid, Casanova, John Dillinger, Edward I, Adolf Eichmann, St. Paul, James Earl Ray, "Boss" Tweed. escaped prison
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  #202  
Old 18 December 2018, 07:28 PM
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Damn, I thought I'd be the first to get question 7! My answer would have been the same as musicgeek's (they all broke out of prison). It was partly a guess but if musicgeek also thinks so, I'm fairly confident.
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  #203  
Old 18 December 2018, 07:47 PM
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Mine was partly a guess as well, so assuming that our partial knowledge isn't a complete overlap, I think we'll take it as mutual confirmation.
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  #204  
Old 18 December 2018, 07:58 PM
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1. In England, "skittles" is not a candy but an early form of what popular modern sport? Bowling.

2. The first oil rush in U.S. history began in 1859 in what northeastern state? Pennsylvania.

3. What word, did the Greek from "force" or "power," did Michael Faraday coin for the electrical generator he invented? Dynamo.

4. The 1970s NBC series Night Gallery was created by a TV legend better known for what similar 1960s show? Rod Serling was the host, more famous for The Twilight Zone.

6. What stage musical's songs include "The Lusty Month of May" and "Guenevere"? Camelot.
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  #205  
Old 19 December 2018, 11:53 AM
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1. Bowling.

2. Pennsylvania?

3. Dynamo.

4. Rod Serling.

5. Lululemon.

6. Camelot.

7. Nothing comes to mind.
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  #206  
Old 25 December 2018, 10:33 AM
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To those who celebrate it, Merry Christmas. To those who don't, happy Tuesday.

Ken Jennings writes:
Happy holidays from Tuesday Trivia DCL, the 650th installment of our never-ending trivia pageant!

This is, I believe, the second time that Tuesday Trivia has ever arrived exactly on Christmas Day. You will be visited tonight by seven questions!

Expect the first question to arrive when the bell tolls one! The "DCL" in the subject line stands for "Definite Christmas Leitmotif," and you'll notice that festive annual Tuesday Trivia tradition continuing in the questions below.

And now, on to ...
LAST WEEK'S ANSWERS

1. In England, "skittles" is not a candy but an early form of what popular modern sport?
All our modern varieties of bowling descended from the old European lawn game called "skittles."

2. The first oil rush in U.S. history began in 1859 in what northeastern state?
By the late 19th century, wells in Pennsylvania were producing a third of the world's petroleum. There's a reason there's still a motor oil called "Quaker State."

3. What word, did the Greek from "force" or "power," did Michael Faraday coin for the electrical generator he invented?
Early generators were called dynamos. Now that's just for Houston soccer teams.

4. The 1970s NBC series Night Gallery was created by a TV legend better known for what similar 1960s show?
Night Gallery was a spooky anthology hosted by Rod Serling. Twilight Zone with sideburns, basically.

5. Little Black Stretchy Pants is a new tell-all book about the 1998 founding of what company?
This is Chip Wilson's memoir about the early days of lululemon.

6. What stage musical's songs include "The Lusty Month of May" and "Guenevere"?
Guenevere sings "The Lusty Month of May"--and several other songs--in the 1960 hit Camelot.

7. What unusual distinction is shared by all these famous people? Billy the Kid, Casanova, John Dillinger, Edward I, Adolf Eichmann, St. Paul, James Earl Ray, "Boss" Tweed.
All these folks, infamous and otherwise, escaped from prison at some point. I think the James Earl Ray escape should be an OMNIBUS entry at some point, because it's (a) insane, (b) not widely remembered anymore, and (c) right in our Carter-era sweet spot.

THIS WEEK'S QUESTIONS

1. What Renaissance master painted the "Adoration of the Magi" seven different times, though he's better known for two canvases depicting springtime?

2. Scientists have noted that, in most popular accounts, Santa's reindeer are all evidently female. How do they know?

3. According to the notation in its official score, what common holiday-season song is sung by "the Wolf" and "the Mouse"?

4. What vaudeville comedian made his last screen appearance narrating TV's Frosty the Snowman?

5. What two countries control the closest pieces of land to the North Pole?

6. What August 1965 event inspired UCLA student Kaulana Marenga to develop the holiday of Kwanzaa?

7. What unusual distinction is shared by all these places? Albuquerque, Cleveland, Madagascar, Muscle Shoals, Olduvai Gorge, Oregon, Puerto Rico, the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge, Waverly Place.

Enjoy!
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  #207  
Old 25 December 2018, 10:42 AM
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#4- Jimmy Durante?

#7- all are sites that Louis Leakey has excavated at.
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  #208  
Old 25 December 2018, 10:49 AM
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1. What Renaissance master painted the "Adoration of the Magi" seven different times, though he's better known for two canvases depicting springtime?

Leonardo

2. Scientists have noted that, in most popular accounts, Santa's reindeer are all evidently female. How do they know?

Reindeer are the only deer where both sexes have antlers, but the bulls generally shed them before christmas

5. What two countries control the closest pieces of land to the North Pole?

Canada and Denmark
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  #209  
Old 25 December 2018, 12:56 PM
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2. Scientists have noted that, in most popular accounts, Santa's reindeer are all evidently female. How do they know? Female reindeer keep their antlers, and most depictions of Santa's reindeer show them all with antlers.

3. According to the notation in its official score, what common holiday-season song is sung by "the Wolf" and "the Mouse"? Baby It's Cold Outside?

4. What vaudeville comedian made his last screen appearance narrating TV's Frosty the Snowman? Jimmy Durante.

5. What two countries control the closest pieces of land to the North Pole? Iceland and Russia?
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  #210  
Old 25 December 2018, 01:16 PM
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1. Leonardo da Vinci.

2. Male reindeer shed their antlers before Christmas.

3. Baby it's Cold Outside.

4. Jimmy Durante.

5. Greenland and Canada?

6. Don't know.

7. That's an interesting set of places, but nothing comes to mind.
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  #211  
Old 25 December 2018, 03:29 PM
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1. Isn't there a code hidden these paintings somewhere? Dan Brown tells me that Leonardo put one in there.

2. I suspect it is two things. One, in the story a "Night Before Christmas" the reindeer are described as tiny, and the female is much smaller than the male. Also, I have been told that males lose their antlers in the autumn and the females in the summer. So, if the reindeer have antlers, they'd be female because the males would be bald.

3. We can't stop talking about "Baby, It's Cold Outside".

4. I know the voice well, but I can't pull a name out of the air.

5. That would be Canada and Denmark (Greenland).

6. Unfortunately, I know nothing of Kwanzaa. I look forward to the answer so I can learn something about it. (In fact, I did not know that it was invented or from the '60s)

7. Given the week delay, I can't even start deducing by looking at these places with a Christmas eye. I have no clue.


Merry Christmas to everyone. 3, maybe 4, for me this week.
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  #212  
Old 25 December 2018, 05:36 PM
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1. What Renaissance master painted the "Adoration of the Magi" seven different times, though he's better known for two canvases depicting springtime? Botticelli

2. Scientists have noted that, in most popular accounts, Santa's reindeer are all evidently female. How do they know? Male reindeer shed their antlers in winter.

3. According to the notation in its official score, what common holiday-season song is sung by "the Wolf" and "the Mouse"? "Baby, It's Cold Outside"

4. What vaudeville comedian made his last screen appearance narrating TV's Frosty the Snowman? Jimmy Durante

5. What two countries control the closest pieces of land to the North Pole? WAG-Russia and Finland?

6. What August 1965 event inspired UCLA student Kaulana Marenga to develop the holiday of Kwanzaa? Watts Riots?
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  #213  
Old 25 December 2018, 07:53 PM
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For 5 I was going to go for Norway (Svalbard) and Greenland (which is semi-independent from Denmark these days) but the people saying Canada and Greenland / Denmark sound quite confident so...

I don't know any of the others that haven't already been got! Which basically means that the only other one I knew was no. 2 anyway.
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  #214  
Old 26 December 2018, 09:34 PM
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For 7 Iím going with theyre all misspelled.
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  #215  
Old 01 January 2019, 12:57 PM
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Happy New Year!

Here we go with ...

LAST WEEK'S ANSWERS

1. What Renaissance master painted the "Adoration of the Magi" seven different times, though he's better known for two canvases depicting springtime?
Sandro Botticelli was apparently seven times more interested in The Birth of Baby Jesus than he was in The Birth of Venus.

2. Scientists have noted that, in most popular accounts, Santa's reindeer are all evidently female. How do they know?
Because they're usually depicted with antlers. Adult male reindeer lose their antlers in late autumn, while females keep theirs year round.

3. According to the notation in its official score, what common holiday-season song is sung by "the Wolf" and "the Mouse"?
"Baby, It's Cold Outside." Problematic!

4. What vaudeville comedian made his last screen appearance narrating TV's Frosty the Snowman?
Frosty had a button nose, but Jimmy Durante had a more substantial one.

5. What two countries control the closest pieces of land to the North Pole?
Assuming Santa has no actual sovereignty, Canada and Denmark (via its control of Greenland) own the northernmost land on earth.

6. What August 1965 event inspired UCLA student Kaulana Marenga to develop the holiday of Kwanzaa?
"UCLA" was the important part here. Marenga was an Angeleno who hoped to bring the black community together after the Watts riots.

7. What unusual distinction is shared by all these places? Albuquerque, Cleveland, Madagascar, Muscle Shoals, Olduvai Gorge, Oregon, Puerto Rico, the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge, Waverly Place.
Each of these places had some kind of misspelling as its official name for many, many years--and in most cases, still today.

THIS WEEK'S QUESTIONS

1. Who was created "Viscount of Alamein" in September 1946?

2. Of the dozens of sequels in wide release to U.S. theaters in 2018, only one numbered its title with Roman numerals. Which movie?

3. What do the initials stand for in HCF, a mythical assembly language command that would make a computer crash irretrievably and require a restart?

4. What English idiom is likely derived from a stinky, salted item that can be drawn across the trail of hounds following a scent, to mislead them?

5. What country borders both the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea?

6. Romanesco, in the cabbage family, looks like a combination between what two more common vegetables, of which it's sometimes considered a variety?

7. What unusual distinction is shared by all these movies? Bad Moms, Batman, The Best Man, Cat People, The Conjuring, Daddy's Home, Ghostbusters, Going My Way, Iron Man 2, Look Who's Talking, Next Friday, You Only Live Twice.

Enjoy!
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  #216  
Old 01 January 2019, 01:09 PM
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I know 1 because he was a relative of mine.
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  #217  
Old 01 January 2019, 01:46 PM
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2. Of the dozens of sequels in wide release to U.S. theaters in 2018, only one numbered its title with Roman numerals. Which movie? Creed II?

3. What do the initials stand for in HCF, a mythical assembly language command that would make a computer crash irretrievably and require a restart? Hard-coded failure.

4. What English idiom is likely derived from a stinky, salted item that can be drawn across the trail of hounds following a scent, to mislead them? Red herring.

5. What country borders both the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea? Ukraine.

6. Romanesco, in the cabbage family, looks like a combination between what two more common vegetables, of which it's sometimes considered a variety? Broccoflower? As in broccoli/cauliflower?
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  #218  
Old 01 January 2019, 02:35 PM
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1. Who was created "Viscount of Alamein" in September 1946?

Montgomery

5. What country borders both the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea?

Russia

6. Romanesco, in the cabbage family, looks like a combination between what two more common vegetables, of which it's sometimes considered a variety?*

Cauliflower and broccoli
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  #219  
Old 01 January 2019, 02:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve View Post
For 7 Iím going with theyre all misspelled.
I assumed that was a joke but it turned out to be the right answer...!

1. General Montgomery.

3. I should know this one - I think it was supposed to put the clock speed right up, or something like that. So that could be the C. (There was more than one command you were supposed to be able to do that set your computer on fire, and some of them related to using a particular piece of hardware such as a disk on maximum for longer than it was supposed to be used... but those ones wouldn't be a single core assembly command, even as a joke. Although this one doesn't claim to actually burn out any hardware components, so I might be getting confused with a different myth anyway.)

4. One idiom that would be close is "Wild Goose Chase but I think there's a more direct phrase that I can't quite remember. The one I gave was more literal, I think, even though you could theoretically salt one and use it to confuse a hunt.

5. Georgia.

6. Cauliflower and broccoli, I suppose. People here usually call it a "fractal cauliflower" or something like that.

I haven't got time to think about the films before posting this...
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  #220  
Old 01 January 2019, 03:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard W View Post
I assumed that was a joke but it turned out to be the right answer...!
Yeah, usually I explain the ones I know, but I had to post from my phone last week and I hate typing at length on it. But I knew it was true for Cleveland, Albuquerque and the Verrazzano Bridge. I couldn't figure out how Puerto Rico fit in, but apparently it used to be Porto Rico.
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