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  #21  
Old 24 May 2009, 09:11 PM
Grievous Angel Grievous Angel is offline
 
 
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It's obvious. The moon's surface has a significant iron content, magnetic soles is the answer.
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  #22  
Old 15 July 2009, 09:14 PM
Azzizi
 
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I would say that the story itself was questionable, except that I have known people who would defend bad science of this nature and they were never short of answers to defend their science.
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  #23  
Old 16 July 2009, 09:36 PM
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Le Chevalier Blanc Le Chevalier Blanc is offline
 
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Default Feather vs. Hammer drop on the moon

I guess the TA would have said that the hammer and the feather in this video were also wearing heavy boots?

Not only does it disprove the TA's statement, it's a great experiment to see!
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  #24  
Old 17 July 2009, 12:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Azzizi View Post
I would say that the story itself was questionable, except that I have known people who would defend bad science of this nature and they were never short of answers to defend their science.
Ain't that the truth.
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  #25  
Old 17 July 2009, 03:10 AM
DaGuyWitBluGlasses DaGuyWitBluGlasses is offline
 
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Judging by the increased number who got the 2nd question right, i would assume the difference is from something i've seen on tv:
"Walking on the moon is "just" like walking under water" (or vice versa) or "Working in Outerspace is jsut like working under water" often on shows with astronauts training in a swimming pool

Pen's typically are lighter than water (though i don't know if ink is or not), and most people would require heavy boots to walk on the bottom of a pool.

So for that quarter that makes up thedifference its a lack of understanding of the concept of atmosphere (or not knowing that the moon has no atmosphere) rather than a lack of understanding about gravity.
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  #26  
Old 18 July 2009, 02:17 PM
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It just proves the bell curve exists and half the people are on one side and the other half are on the other.
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  #27  
Old 18 July 2009, 02:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A Turtle Named Mack View Post
Unfortunately, the attitude of the TA in the OP article is frightfully common among philosophy students and many other 'intellectuals' - a contemptuous disdain for what used to be called 'natural philosophy' or for any sort of reference to how things actually work. My impression is that this is driven in part by a desire to devise an ideal world including that the world should be a blank slate on which to impose one's idealization, and in part by a near-total inability to handle the rigorous thinking and the math needed to deal with observable facts.
You know, I ran into that (head on) when I took a psyc class in college. The teacher absolutely would not under any circumstance accept that emotions were influenced by involuntary bio-chemical reactions, even after I went to the library and made copies of several peer-reviewed articles on the subject.

The two of us didn't get along well after that.
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  #28  
Old 18 July 2009, 05:24 PM
bjohn13
 
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Hold up a second here. I always thought that the terms "ground" and "earth" were synonomous. There simply cannot be any earth on the moon because if someone brings earth to the moon, it will cease to be earth. Therefore, there cannot be any ground on the moon either. Therefore, since there is no ground on the moon, then if I dropped a pen on the moon, it would obviously not fall to the ground. It would fall to the moon. Therefore, since the pen would float to the moon and the moon floats above the earth, the most correct answer to that question would be that it would float away.

Geez...don't you guys know anything about philosophicalizing?
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  #29  
Old 18 July 2009, 06:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bjohn13 View Post
Hold up a second here. I always thought that the terms "ground" and "earth" were synonomous. There simply cannot be any earth on the moon because if someone brings earth to the moon, it will cease to be earth. Therefore, there cannot be any ground on the moon either. Therefore, since there is no ground on the moon, then if I dropped a pen on the moon, it would obviously not fall to the ground. It would fall to the moon. Therefore, since the pen would float to the moon and the moon floats above the earth, the most correct answer to that question would be that it would float away.
But even if we use that definition of "ground", it would only float away from the earth on the side of the moon that faces the earth. If you were on the side of the moon that faces away from the earth, then the pen would drop towards both the moon and the earth.

Apparently, the TA in the OP thought the moon was a Lagrange point...
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  #30  
Old 18 July 2009, 10:44 PM
bjohn13
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WingedBear View Post
But even if we use that definition of "ground", it would only float away from the earth on the side of the moon that faces the earth.

So...in other words....it would float in one place? Or are we to assume that the universe itself is in motion, which means that would could not correctly answer the question with the observable data since the pen could be actually sitting still in relation to a moving universe?

My head is starting to hurt. What were we talking about again?
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