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  #1  
Old 29 February 2008, 07:46 AM
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snopes snopes is offline
 
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Dog Bestiality or laziness?

Comment: i'm quite sure i didn't imagine this one but can find no
reference to it either on your site or the internet in general.

this would have been two or three decades ago and involves one of the
"advice sisters" ann or abby, i'm not sure which. i have a very clear
image of myself reading an item in a column wherin a woman wrote in to say
that her son told her about a male co-worker who was always having sex
with his dog. the son detailed when, where and how often this would occur
and the woman was understandably concerned for the canine's wellbeing.

the advice sister took the inquiry very seriously and addressed issues of
the legality of bestiality, the mental health of the dog owner and what
sort of intervention was appropriate.

it was weeks, perhaps months later that it occurred to me that the son was
almost certainly complaining that his co-worker was "always ****ing the
dog"... i.e. slacking off. that the misunderstanding was allowed to
propagate to the point of being printed as a story about bestiality in a
syndicated column struck me as pretty mind boggling. as i look back, it
seems likely that the "woman's" letter was likely a prank submission.

have you folks ever come across this one or did i see it on the Simpsons?
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  #2  
Old 29 February 2008, 09:20 AM
zephyra
 
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is "NFBSKing the dog" a common expression somewhere? I've never heard it.
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  #3  
Old 29 February 2008, 10:09 AM
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Tarquin Farquart Tarquin Farquart is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zephyra View Post
is "NFBSKing the dog" a common expression somewhere? I've never heard it.
Neither have I. Now where's my dictionary of slang...
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  #4  
Old 29 February 2008, 10:35 AM
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I've heard the phrase, "screw the pooch", but I never knew what it really meant.

ETA
http://www.urbandictionary.com/defin...crew+the+pooch
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  #5  
Old 29 February 2008, 10:37 AM
Jay Tea Jay Tea is offline
 
 
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Ponder

I've heard 'screwed the pooch', but that just means a cock-up.
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  #6  
Old 29 February 2008, 10:40 AM
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Tarquin Farquart Tarquin Farquart is offline
 
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I've heard "F*** a dog!" as an exclamation of surprise, but it's more likely to be "F*** a duck!"
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  #7  
Old 29 February 2008, 01:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zephyra View Post
is "NFBSKing the dog" a common expression somewhere? I've never heard it.
Include me on the list of people who have never heard of this expression referring to anything other than literally NFBSKing the dog.
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  #8  
Old 29 February 2008, 02:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aranea russus View Post
Along with "Strike a light, gov'ner!". (whispers: Tarquin we only talk like then when there's american tourists around)
People here say "f*** a duck," too. Or "lord love a duck."
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  #9  
Old 29 February 2008, 02:29 PM
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I recall reading about the phrase "****ing the dog" somewhere, though I'm not sure I've ever heard it said in real life. If I recall correctly, the source commented that in polite company, the term "screwing the pooch" or "making puppies" was used. But it definitely meant "do nothing."

After a quick search, I realize this may be a Canadian term and I may have read it in a guide to Canadian phrases:

http://www.canadaka.net/content/page...-english-words

Quote:
**** the dog: A term used to indicate doing nothing (e.g. I ****ed the dog all weekend). May be referred to as Making Puppies or Screwing the Pooch in polite company. Also refers to slacking off at work or getting paid to do nothing. However, in Québec, to "**** the dog" (f***é le chien) means to screw things up, like in "I was with this girl but got too drunk and embarassed myself, I told you, I **** the dog!"
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  #10  
Old 29 February 2008, 03:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tarquin Farquart View Post
Neither have I. Now where's my dictionary of slang...
It's in The Cassell Dictionary Of Slang; also "Finger the dog" and "F*ck the dog and sell the pups". It says it's US, post-1910, and it can mean to waste time or to bungle things. There's also "F*ck the duck", with the same meanings dating from 1960+.
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  #11  
Old 29 February 2008, 03:29 PM
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Tarquin Farquart Tarquin Farquart is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aranea russus View Post
Along with "Strike a light, gov'ner!". (whispers: Tarquin we only talk like then when there's american tourists around)
Stone the crows! Lawks a mercy!
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  #12  
Old 29 February 2008, 04:22 PM
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Dutch Angua Dutch Angua is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tarquin Farquart View Post
Stone the crows! Lawks a mercy!
Crivens!


Couldn't resist
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  #13  
Old 29 February 2008, 04:32 PM
Elsie
 
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Does it seem very likely that a young man would use the term "f***ing the dog" to his mother? Or would he have softened the phrase somewhat if that's what he liteally meant? Also, what was his tone of voice when conveying the information to his mother? Was he clearly pissed off and ranting, thereby indicating from context that it was a figure of speech meaning something else, or was he nervous and concerned to be talking about such a sensitive subject with his mother?
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  #14  
Old 29 February 2008, 04:33 PM
AESP_pres AESP_pres is offline
 
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I'm French Canadian and this is a phrase that I was using frequently at my previous job. I was working at night hours and the job take only 2 hours to be done, so the 7 others hours consisted to give service to 3 or 4 drunk guys.

Everytime someone asked about what Idid at my job, the answer was the same.

Asking person : What you have done last night?
Me : A little cleaning and after that ****ing the dog (or "Fourrer le chien" the french traduction)

Jimmy "I've never think that this expression really exist
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  #15  
Old 29 February 2008, 05:01 PM
Meka Meka is online now
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beejtronic View Post
I recall reading about the phrase "****ing the dog" somewhere, though I'm not sure I've ever heard it said in real life. If I recall correctly, the source commented that in polite company, the term "screwing the pooch" or "making puppies" was used. But it definitely meant "do nothing."

After a quick search, I realize this may be a Canadian term and I may have read it in a guide to Canadian phrases:

http://www.canadaka.net/content/page...-english-words
I've never heard the full phrase before, but back when I was running cross country, we used "dogging it" all the time to describe slacking off on a workout.

ex: "40 minutes. Did you push yourself or were you dogging it?"

I don't think I've heard it used to describe something other than physical activity, though.
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  #16  
Old 29 February 2008, 06:27 PM
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When Mrs. G was not yet Mrs. G, she worked as a chambermaid at a low-budget hotel (actually, it was student housing doubling as a low-budget hotel in the summer) and the phrases "f***ing the dog" and "dog-f***er" (for someone who didn't do much work) were commonly used by her and her cow-orkers.

ETA: Yes, this was in Canada. So it may be a Canadian phrase.
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  #17  
Old 29 February 2008, 07:06 PM
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NorthernLite NorthernLite is offline
 
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Canada

It's a very common expression around here that means doing next to nothing.
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  #18  
Old 29 February 2008, 07:59 PM
8Ball
 
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Common phrase around here too.
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  #19  
Old 29 February 2008, 09:35 PM
rockstar1976 rockstar1976 is offline
 
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ummm, wow! That's a VERY common expression here (ontario, canada). In fact, I was ****ing the dog this morning!
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  #20  
Old 29 February 2008, 10:13 PM
candy from strangers candy from strangers is offline
 
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Dog

Quote:
Originally Posted by rockstar1976 View Post
ummm, wow! That's a VERY common expression here (ontario, canada). In fact, I was ****ing the dog this morning!
I know the meaning of the phrase has just been explained, but this post still makes me chuckle quite heartily.
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