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  #641  
Old 13 February 2018, 08:44 PM
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Winnie-The-Pooh isn't, in its best and most famous form. (Or in the other form that we don't mention). A few of the others are or could be, but Watership Down doesn't include illustrations apart from the one Steve already mentioned, which doesn't appear to match your idea (or the ideas before).

Steve's idea definitely fits... the only basis to think Steve is wrong seems to be that it's not unusual enough, but none of the more specific ideas have yet worked.
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  #642  
Old 13 February 2018, 09:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seaboe Muffinchucker View Post
Now I know I'm sick--I can't work up the energy to answer this week's questions. Sorry.

Seaboe
Aw, you were always my favourite contestant.

Get well soon, Seaboe.
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  #643  
Old 13 February 2018, 11:39 PM
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2. In standard chess notation, what's the only piece not represented by the first letter of its English name? Knight, because K is King.

3. Who ended their longstanding collaboration in 1890 in a bitter legal battle over the cost of new carpet for the lobby of London's Savoy Theatre? Gilbert and Sullivan.

4. What's the most common pet in America today, with a total of 139 million owned, half again as many as any other type of pet? Dog?
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  #644  
Old 14 February 2018, 06:21 AM
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1. What two European nations with a shared 1,000-mile border also shared a monarchy between 1814 and 1905 as the "United Kingdoms"?

Norway and Sweden.

2. In standard chess notation, what's the only piece not represented by the first letter of its English name?

The King?

3. Who ended their longstanding collaboration in 1890 in a bitter legal battle over the cost of new carpet for the lobby of London's Savoy Theatre?

No idea.

4. What's the most common pet in America today, with a total of 139 million owned, half again as many as any other type of pet?

Cats.

5. What tourist attraction, which opened April 12, 1992, did French theater director Ariane Mnouchkine famously call a "cultural Chernobyl"?

Probably Euro-Disneyland.

6. The stars Alnitak, Alnilam, and Mintaka make up what part of the constellation Orion?

Three stars in orion? Must be the belt.
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  #645  
Old 14 February 2018, 01:03 PM
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I concur about the stars.
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  #646  
Old 14 February 2018, 01:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hans Off View Post
is #7 ...
I know specifically that The Phantom Tollbooth was not.
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  #647  
Old 14 February 2018, 03:13 PM
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Way late, but I promise I haven't read anyone else's answers yet.
Quote:
Originally Posted by DadOf3 View Post
THIS WEEK'S QUESTIONS

1. What two European nations with a shared 1,000-mile border also shared a monarchy between 1814 and 1905 as the "United Kingdoms"?
Austria & Hungary ETA: I have no excuse for not getting this right, in view of my ancestry (specifically the facts that my great-grandfather, my maternal grandfather and my maternal grandmother were all born in the United Kingdoms).
Quote:


2. In standard chess notation, what's the only piece not represented by the first letter of its English name?
The knight.
Quote:


3. Who ended their longstanding collaboration in 1890 in a bitter legal battle over the cost of new carpet for the lobby of London's Savoy Theatre?
Gilbert & Sullivan. It had never been a particularly harmonious relationship, anyway.
Quote:


4. What's the most common pet in America today, with a total of 139 million owned, half again as many as any other type of pet?
In my neighborhood, this would be the dog, but I suspect overall, it's the cat.
Quote:


5. What tourist attraction, which opened April 12, 1992, did French theater director Ariane Mnouchkine famously call a "cultural Chernobyl"?
Disneyland Paris. I'm sure he thinks the Academie Francais is progressive, too.
Quote:


6. The stars Alnitak, Alnilam, and Mintaka make up what part of the constellation Orion?
The belt, it being the obvious part with three stars.
Quote:


7. What unusual distinction is shared by all these children's books? The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, The Hobbit, How to Train Your Dragon, The Phantom Tollbooth, Tik-Tok of Oz, Watership Down, The Wind in the Willows, Winnie-the-Poo[h](I assume there's not a defecating bear with that name I'm unaware of)
Okay, I'm better, but still not well enough to work this one out.

Seaboe

Last edited by Seaboe Muffinchucker; 14 February 2018 at 03:18 PM.
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  #648  
Old 14 February 2018, 04:42 PM
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1. Norway and Sweden

2. Knight? could be confused with King maybe

3. Gilbert and Sullivan, only names I can think of

4. Cat. It's easy to own six or seven. Dogs are much more work

5. Would that be EuroDisney?

6. I'm guessing the belt

7. All started as smaller works that grew far beyond original intention.
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  #649  
Old 14 February 2018, 07:11 PM
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Ooh, UEL gave me an idea--they all started out as stories that we being told out loud (I know this is true for The Hobbit, Wind in the Willows, and Winnie the Pooh).

Seaboe
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  #650  
Old 14 February 2018, 09:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seaboe Muffinchucker View Post
Ooh, UEL gave me an idea--they all started out as stories that we being told out loud (I know this is true for The Hobbit, Wind in the Willows, and Winnie the Pooh).
The list doesn't include Alice's Adventures in Wonderland*, which I believe also started as verbal tales. While the list isn't said to be inclusive, that's a pretty big title to leave off the list.

* Not sure if that is the original title but can't search it.
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  #651  
Old 14 February 2018, 09:22 PM
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Where does that Oz one come in the series? Several of the others are first novels. But that's not unusual without something else - every published novelist has a first novel after all. And I assume the Oz one isn't the first in the series.

(eta) Yes, the book GenYus mentioned would be another obvious one to have mentioned by several of these criteria. (Although I don't think it has a map). And it even helped to define the background colour that we're using to hide spoilers.
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  #652  
Old 14 February 2018, 09:43 PM
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What does it have to do with cornflower??? I think Richard W is smoking something, I can't see what Alice's story has to do with spoiler hiding.
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  #653  
Old 15 February 2018, 12:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seaboe Muffinchucker View Post
Ooh, UEL gave me an idea--they all ...
Watership Down fits this, too.
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  #654  
Old 15 February 2018, 02:40 PM
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Mr. Jennings has been known to omit items from his list if he feels they would make the answer too obvious.

Seaboe
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  #655  
Old 20 February 2018, 01:17 PM
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Happy Tuesday, everyone.

LAST WEEK'S ANSWERS

1. What two European nations with a shared 1,000-mile border also shared a monarchy between 1814 and 1905 as the "United Kingdoms"?
The longest border in Europe separates Norway and Sweden--ever since their union dissolved in 1905.

2. In standard chess notation, what's the only piece not represented by the first letter of its English name?
King was already 'K', so knight has to be 'N'.

3. Who ended their longstanding collaboration in 1890 in a bitter legal battle over the cost of new carpet for the lobby of London's Savoy Theatre?
Gilbert and Sullivan probably thought they could survive any blow, but I guess that rug really tied the room together. They reconciled in 1891, but only produced two minor, unsuccessful works that are never performed today. So they really needn't have bothered.

4. What's the most common pet in America today, with a total of 139 million owned, half again as many as any other type of pet?
Fish--specifically freshwater ones--are the most populous pet in America, outnumbering the second-place pet (cats) by over fifty million.

5. What tourist attraction, which opened April 12, 1992, did French theater director Ariane Mnouchkine famously call a "cultural Chernobyl"?
A lot of French people were really, really not into Euro Disney. Did they not know that Space Mountain had a Jules Verne theme? Everyone likes steampunk.

6. The stars Alnitak, Alnilam, and Mintaka make up what part of the constellation Orion?
This asterism is called Orion's belt.

7. What unusual distinction is shared by all these children's books? The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, The Hobbit, How to Train Your Dragon, The Phantom Tollbooth, Tik-Tok of Oz, Watership Down, The Wind in the Willows, Winnie-the-Pooh.
Each of these classics includes a map with the text. This seems like one of those times I might get a lot of "That's not unusual at all!" complaints via email. Settle down, friends. Read a book without dragons on the cover from time to time.

THIS WEEK'S QUESTIONS

1. What are "Bacillus" bacteria shaped like?

2. What author founded National Review magazine in 1955?

3. What NBA coach, in his 22nd season with his team, is currently the longest tenured coach in any of the four major North American sports organizations?

4. What fictional American town is closely associated with products like Powdermilk Biscuits and Beebop-a-Ree-Bop Rhubarb Pie?

5. What country's national day, January 26, commemorates the 1788 landing of the First Fleet, but is sometimes referred to as "Invasion Day" by minority groups?

6. Which book of the Bible includes a vision of scroll closed with seven seals?

7. What unusual distinction is shared by all these famous people? Yasser Arafat, Peter Boyle, Stephen Fry, Joseph Goebbels, Fred Grandy, William Holden, Michael Jackson, David Miscavige, Leonard Nimoy, Prince Harry, Frank Sinatra.

Enjoy!
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  #656  
Old 20 February 2018, 01:26 PM
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1. What are "Bacillus" bacteria shaped like?

I seem to remember that the name means "little stick" in Latin.

5. What country's national day, January 26, commemorates the 1788 landing of the First Fleet, but is sometimes referred to as "Invasion Day" by minority groups?

Australia

6. Which book of the Bible includes a vision of scroll closed with seven seals?

Revelation

7. What unusual distinction is shared by all these famous people? Yasser Arafat, Peter Boyle, Stephen Fry, Joseph Goebbels, Fred Grandy, William Holden, Michael Jackson, David Miscavige, Leonard Nimoy, Prince Harry, Frank Sinatra.

They come from another planet?
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  #657  
Old 20 February 2018, 01:55 PM
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#7. They all worked on the Love Boat.
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  #658  
Old 20 February 2018, 02:01 PM
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#2 is William F. Buckley
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  #659  
Old 20 February 2018, 02:05 PM
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3. What NBA coach, in his 22nd season with his team, is currently the longest tenured coach in any of the four major North American sports organizations? Pat Riley?

4. What fictional American town is closely associated with products like Powdermilk Biscuits and Beebop-a-Ree-Bop Rhubarb Pie? Is Lake Wobegon fictional? Because that sounds like stuff that would be from there.
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  #660  
Old 20 February 2018, 02:34 PM
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Good grief. I never thought of fish.

I suppose they get up to that number because people who keep fish often have quite a few of them, while people who have cats or dogs very often only have one or two and very rarely have dozens.

That was a good one. This one isn't:

Quote:
Originally Posted by DadOf3 View Post
LAST WEEK'S ANSWERS
7. Each of these classics includes a map with the text. This seems like one of those times I might get a lot of "That's not unusual at all!" complaints via email. Settle down, friends. Read a book without dragons on the cover from time to time.
Not only are maps very common in fantasy books; they're also pretty common in certain types of mysteries.


THIS WEEK'S QUESTIONS

2. What author founded National Review magazine in 1955?

William F Buckley. I think.

4. What fictional American town is closely associated with products like Powdermilk Biscuits and Beebop-a-Ree-Bop Rhubarb Pie?

Lake Woebegone.

5. What country's national day, January 26, commemorates the 1788 landing of the First Fleet, but is sometimes referred to as "Invasion Day" by minority groups?

Australia.

6. Which book of the Bible includes a vision of scroll closed with seven seals?

Revelations.
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