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Old 25 July 2017, 12:29 PM
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DawnStorm DawnStorm is offline
 
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Heavt breathing Anyone here use a CPAP machine?

My friend "Jane" has sleep apnea and knows it. Her doctor wants her to use a CPAP machine. Jane knows she needs it, but she told me she likes to sleep on her stomach. Is that possible? She also wonders how she can sleep with all that noise, or are newer CPAP machines quieter? I wonder all that myself.
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Old 25 July 2017, 12:48 PM
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Heavt breathing

Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnStorm View Post
My friend "Jane" has sleep apnea and knows it. Her doctor wants her to use a CPAP machine. Jane knows she needs it, but she told me she likes to sleep on her stomach. Is that possible? She also wonders how she can sleep with all that noise, or are newer CPAP machines quieter? I wonder all that myself.
The question you should have asked is "anyone here supposed to use a CPAP machine?" My wife and I both have them, but wind up using them only when air quality, etc. make the sleep apnea worse. Unfortunately, this is common.

But on to your question: If she prefers the smaller nose-only mask (most people do) and it fits well, then I'd say she's probably going to be okay on her stomach. The real problem would be if she's a tosser & turner, as she'd get tangled in the hose. Unless she's a very light sleeper or needs absolute silence, the noise is not a problem either, although she might take a few days to get used to it.

I've also found that even a few hours of sleep with the machine can make one feel very rested, so if it gets uncomfortable as the night wears on, take it off and turn it off. (Standard disclaimer: I am not a doctor.)
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Old 25 July 2017, 03:19 PM
dfresh dfresh is offline
 
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My wife has a CPAP, and can't sleep on her stomach with it. However, she has a large mask, which might be because she has like WOW bad sleep apnea. The noise is not too loud, and I find it actually helps me sleep by acting like a white noise machine in our room.
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Old 25 July 2017, 03:29 PM
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NobleHunter NobleHunter is offline
 
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I do fine on my stomach with my nose-only mask. It took a bit to get used to with how the straps and the hose press against the pillow and bed.

My machine is pretty quiet. Especially when it doesn't go to full pressure while I'm trying to sleep. Though I don't run mine at a high pressure so that might help with the quiet.
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Old 25 July 2017, 03:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnStorm View Post
Her doctor wants her to use a CPAP machine.
Not to sound all morbid here, but Obstructive Sleep Apnea is not something to mess around with, and if "Jane" has gone through a sleep study and her doctor has ordered CPAP or BiPAP treatment, she should know that it's not a diagnosis to be taken lightly. OSA was the (seemingly) out of the blue contributor to the loss of Carrie Fisher, but that's old news to doctors. Cardiovascular issues are only some of the very real, very serious, very preventable complications that can be brought on (or further complicated by) OSA. Being tired sucks and not waking up rested feels lousy (both of which should be greatly improved with treatment) but there's much more on the line.

While the idea of having to wear a mask at night can be intimidating, and while sleeping positions and habits are really hard to change as an adult, they're small sacrifices to make against your long-term health. There are also a whole host of products that allow you to arrange your face and mask in nearly any position (such as concave and other shaped foam pillows and dozens if not hundreds of mask, head gear, and tubing styles) and little devices that will keep your tubing out of the way, warmed, humidified, or hung above you no matter how much you toss and turn. Current-generation CPAP and BiPAP machines are almost whisper quiet, very much like soft white nose, and nearly all masks are designed to route the exhaled air away from your face, so you don't feel it. Depending on what part of your airway is in collapse (only your doctor can answer that for you), you likely won't have to have a mask over your mouth, only your nose. They're small, light, and unintrusive.

When I was first diagnosed I was worried too, and it did take a while to get used to my mask - unfortunately I have to wear one that covers both my mouth and nose, but even with all that bulk, I was able to get used to it. Please understand that this is a non-invasive treatment that could save your life. Explore your options and talk with your doctor(s) to make sure that you're getting the treatment you need.
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Old 26 July 2017, 01:42 AM
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I second Kallah's post. Me, I didn't have too much trouble adjusting to my machine, but I was so tired of, well, being tired all the time that I was pretty much desperate, more than happy to wear the mask if it meant I could wake up refreshed. Before the CPAP, I never felt well-rested. Didn't matter when I went to bed or when I woke up. There were days I went to bed at midnight, woke up at noon, and still felt exhausted.

Jane might decide that the benefits of being well-rested, far outweigh sleeping on her stomach. As for the noise factor, a CPAP probably makes less noise than the noise made by an apnea sufferer. Speaking as an apnea sufferer, before I got my machine, I snored like a lumberjack interspaced with intervals where I gasped for air because I couldn't breathe.
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Old 26 July 2017, 03:37 PM
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Sylvanz Sylvanz is offline
 
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DH and I both use CPAP. He wears a full face mask and I wear a nasal mask. He's had his for years and I just started this year. The machines barely make any noise (though I sleep with a fan) and I don't wake myself up snoring anymore. The first night I threw the mask off after 4 hours. Since then I wear it all the time, and almost can't sleep without it. I feel more rested. I didn't have the typical obstruction, however my pulse ox would drop to below 70 while I was sleeping that is very bad.

Like others have said above, there are many different masks and devices made to make CPAP work for most individuals, and most important it can and does save lives.
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Old 26 July 2017, 04:07 PM
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It's amazing how much more functional am I with my machine. I just wish the results were more consistent. Even when the numbers are good, it seems like I relapse every week or so.
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Old 27 July 2017, 03:59 AM
Aud 1 Aud 1 is offline
 
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Has Jane looked into mandibular advancement devices? This is a treatment for OSA that moves the jaw forward allowing the airway to be more open.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mandib...ncement_splint
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23997711
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  #10  
Old 27 July 2017, 05:49 PM
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DawnStorm DawnStorm is offline
 
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Heavt breathing

I did mention to Jane that there was a nose-only mask and that depending on the breaks she could sleep on her stomach. I just mentioned that I did some research. I think I reassured her to the point where she will discuss it further with her doctor, so thanks all! She'll probably have to get tested first, but at least she knows that CPAPs aren't all huge masks and noise.
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Old 27 July 2017, 10:22 PM
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I was almost disappointed when my mask wasn't some absurdly complicated Cthulu-like thing. Instead, it's like I'm doing a cheap elephant cosplay.
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Old 27 July 2017, 10:29 PM
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Sylvanz Sylvanz is offline
 
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I've been thinking of trying the nasal pillows. They're much less bulky and intimidating than they were when DH first started wearing his. He's on his third machine design now. His latest was so much easier to clean, and mine is easier than his 'cause I have the latest.

Mine is, "Resmed for Her." I thought, "Oh they just want to put pretty leaves on it and make it girly," however, I guess that there is a difference in therapy between men and women. I guess it makes sense when you think about it. I still wouldn't have minded a plain black one, but the leaves are pretty, so there is that.
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Old 28 July 2017, 12:57 AM
dfresh dfresh is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NobleHunter View Post
I was almost disappointed when my mask wasn't some absurdly complicated Cthulu-like thing. Instead, it's like I'm doing a cheap elephant cosplay.
But you can sound like Darth Vader, which is a pretty major turn-on.
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Old 28 July 2017, 01:44 PM
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Plurabelle Plurabelle is offline
 
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My husband has a CPAP and since he holds a Class A driver's license, is required to use it for a minimum of 6 hours per night.

The CPAP is super quiet, but that was one given to us free by the Canadian government (he's still on OHIP. 3 cheers for OHIP!).

The masks we had to pay for ourselves, and we have had literally every single kind of mask available. The one he currently prefers is the "elephant mask" (as I call it) - it has a nose mask and tube on the top of your head. He loves it, and sleeps in any old position he chooses. He also takes it off in his sleep and I have to put it back on to get in the 6 hours but you didn't ask about that.
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