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Old 05 September 2017, 07:07 PM
DawnStorm's Avatar
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Flame Amazon being sued over faulty eclipse glasses

Story here: http://fortune.com/2017/08/30/amazon...lipse-glasses/

Seems they didn't get the email about the recall...
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  #2  
Old 05 September 2017, 07:57 PM
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A local coffee stand chain offered free eclipse glasses as a promotion, then discovered that they were defective and had to do a recall two days before the eclipse.

They offered a free large drink for every pair of glasses turned in prior to the eclipse.
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Old 05 September 2017, 09:13 PM
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I like Amazon, but they really should be more careful about quality control when it comes to what they let their distributors get away with. I didn't buy eclipse glasses, but I've seen a number of products where third party sellers get away with selling inferior counterfeit products under the same listing at the actual product, undercutting honest vendors on the price. So some listings have a bunch 4-5 star ratings for a good while, then suddenly a bunch of 1-2 ratings from when people start getting knockoffs. Sometimes there is no way to know if Amazon is going to let some scammer fulfill your order for that product or not.

If there is a cheap, garbage brand of product and you don't do your homework, that's partially your fault (though still unacceptable if it's a consumer safety issue like eclipse glasses). But if there is a good brand and you do everything right as a consumer, but then Amazon allows some predator to send you something other than the exact thing you ordered, that's a problem with the way they do business.
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Old 06 September 2017, 12:22 AM
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Yea. Selling through Amazon can be a hit or miss thing sometimes. People really like a bargain, but if a seller claims that they are guaranteed safe just to get a sale, then there has to be some sort of way that can be enforced. Saying buyer beware is just not a thing we can rely on and Amazon has to be better at vetting claims of products that they host. It hurts them if they are associated with bad products.
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Old 06 September 2017, 03:55 AM
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I will say that Amazon has been good about rectifying complaints after the fact, but in the case of something like the OP (where the faulty product can cause harm), I can see your point. However, I don't know how they can possibly do that kind of vetting on the scale at which they operate.
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Old 06 September 2017, 05:04 AM
jimmy101_again jimmy101_again is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by musicgeek View Post
I will say that Amazon has been good about rectifying complaints after the fact, but in the case of something like the OP (where the faulty product can cause harm), I can see your point. However, I don't know how they can possibly do that kind of vetting on the scale at which they operate.
Easy enough to enforce. Simply make them liable for the products they sell. Problem solved. If they are going to profit from selling defective products then they should also be liable for damages.

US business are adept at shifting liability to others and often to nobody at all. Often the liability is shifted to what is basically a shell company that exists for the sole purpose of diffusing liability. Unfortunately, it is completely legal in many settings.

A local cable company has repeated cut utility lines (especially gas lines) while installing new cables. But they hire subcontractors to carry out the actual work and Indiana law says those subs are 100% responsible. The subs get fined, stop operations, file bankruptcy and legally vanish. They then reform with the same people and equipment (bought for pennies on the dollar from the liquidation of the previous company). The big cable company loves it because they are shielded from liability for the installation of their cables. The little companies like it because they can default on their loans and buy their equipment cheap. (Who else besides a cable installer wants to buy a half dozen specialized cable laying tractors and tunnelers?)

Laying cable or selling health-critical equipment online, in both cases the people profiting really should be shouldering the liability.
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Old 06 September 2017, 06:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmy101_again View Post
Easy enough to enforce. Simply make them liable for the products they sell. Problem solved. If they are going to profit from selling defective products then they should also be liable for damages.

.

I was wondering how companies like Amazon can vet their vendors; to make sure that the product(s) are/is not defective, stolen, or counterfeit. Ditto for eBay. But how to make sure that Amazon et al aren't driven out of business by frivolous lawsuits?
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Old 06 September 2017, 07:12 PM
jimmy101_again jimmy101_again is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnStorm View Post
I was wondering how companies like Amazon can vet their vendors; to make sure that the product(s) are/is not defective, stolen, or counterfeit. Ditto for eBay. But how to make sure that Amazon et al aren't driven out of business by frivolous lawsuits?
The same way Ford or GE or Safeway or Sears aren't driven out of business by frivolous lawsuits?
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  #9  
Old 06 September 2017, 07:27 PM
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Seaboe Muffinchucker Seaboe Muffinchucker is offline
 
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Glasses

Truly frivolous lawsuits rarely make it very far.

Seaboe
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  #10  
Old 11 September 2017, 08:23 PM
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Regarding those eclipse glasses: I was surprised how many people at the local park were just reclining in their chairs watching the sun for 10-15 minutes prior to the peak eclipse. You can probably get away with looking at the sun with underperforming glasses that appear to block enough optical light for 30 seconds as they will likely block enough to prevent too much damage. But if the glasses didn't effectively filter some of the UV spectrum, 10 minutes would be enough to burn the retina. That's a lot of trust to have in a flimsy pair of eclipse glasses.
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