snopes.com  

Go Back   snopes.com > SLC Central > SLC

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 28 August 2017, 04:28 PM
Aud 1 Aud 1 is offline
 
Join Date: 05 October 2005
Location: Missouri
Posts: 7,120
Ambulance What do you do for disaster preparedness?

What do you do? What would you grab in an evacuation? When I started looking into this a few years ago the prepper websites were overwhelming.
We have a go bag. We have a camp stove and a solar cooker. Non-electric can openers. There are generally several cans of soup. A few gallons of water.

There is no way I'm ready for "The Road" but we should be able to shelter in place for a few days without electricity.

It seemed to rude to be philosophical about this in the Harvey thread when Snopesters are facing a real threat but this is on my mind.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 28 August 2017, 04:32 PM
Latiam's Avatar
Latiam Latiam is offline
 
Join Date: 19 June 2005
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 4,468
Default

We have nothing. I'm considering buying one of those kits that are for sale.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 28 August 2017, 04:36 PM
Sue's Avatar
Sue Sue is offline
 
Join Date: 26 December 2011
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 8,398
Default

We have all our camping gear, which includes a cooking stove and we also have water stored away someplace (I've no idea how often we should just dump the old water and put in fresh) but if a real disaster struck like the ice storm where some people lost power for weeks on end we have no real plan.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 28 August 2017, 04:58 PM
Beachlife!'s Avatar
Beachlife! Beachlife! is offline
 
Join Date: 23 June 2001
Location: Lansing, MI
Posts: 28,056
Default

I've got a go bag that I keep in my car which has enough to get me by for a week or more. I have camping gear at home and usually enough food to get me through at least a week. Water won't be an issue for me, at least not at home, as my pool has thousands of gallons even in the winter.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 28 August 2017, 05:33 PM
Aud 1 Aud 1 is offline
 
Join Date: 05 October 2005
Location: Missouri
Posts: 7,120
Default

There are some useful lists at Zombie Squad
https://www.zombiehunters.org/wiki/index.php/Main_Page
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 28 August 2017, 05:33 PM
GenYus234's Avatar
GenYus234 GenYus234 is offline
 
Join Date: 02 August 2005
Location: Mesa, AZ
Posts: 24,512
Default

I am no expert, but I've read up a bit on SHTF* packing.

We have pre-packed backpacks and travel bags for evacuation and extra supplies for shelter in place (SIP) situations.

Canned goods are good for shelter in place, but are heavy for packing out. For emergencies, there are extremely high-density food cubes like these. I'd get a few and try them out for taste. While taste isn't life-saving, keeping morale up is important.

First and foremost, you'll need water. Most people can't carry enough water for 3 days (1 gallon per person per day is recommended. That's about 24 pounds all by itself.), so a LifeStraw is crucial. They consist of a membrane that will filter out almost every harmful microorganism that can live in water. With some of those, a water source that isn't contaminated with chemicals will be pretty safe to drink.

Each backpacks contains:
2 L water (about 1 day's worth)
Activated charcol filters (can remove some chemical contamination)
3 days freeze dried food and food bars
1 week of our medications
anti-inflamitory (in case of aching backs and joints)
portable camp stove (packs small and you can fit a half-dozen fuel pellets and matches inside it
plastic eating utensils
extra fuel pellets
multiple bundles of matches in waterproof containers
flashlight
extra batteries
solar/hand cranked radio/battery charger
signal mirror
whistle
rope
folding knife
basic first aid kit (bandages, antibiotic oitment, ace bandage)
moleskin (for blisters)
hand sanitizer
sunscreen
lip balm
work gloves
hat
rain poncho (also good for sun protection)
spare socks (good for preventing blisters)
bandana (sun protection, dust protection, sling, emergency bandage...)
comfort kit (soap, microfiber towel, dry shampoo, body wipes, deoderant, toothbrushes, toothpaste)
can openers (in case we start scrounging)
sewing kit
collapsable water carrier (5 gallon size)

In addition, we have small packs the size of a lunchbox. These have another folding knife, matches, survival whistle, signalling mirror, LifeStraw water bottle and a food bar.

My wife's pack weighs about 15 lbs, mine is about 20 (I have extra water). That is heavy, but doable by us. Obviously, YMMV. I packed two of things we only need one for for redudency sake. Obviously you can cut down on weight by limiting some things to just one.

Because we are in southern AZ, we put more emphasis on hot weather survival with water and sun protection. The addition of a jacket and knit cap is all we need for winter. Those in northern areas would need to think about heavier clothing. My theory is to pack for the least survivable time of year then adjust downward if you get lucky.

Our SIP is all of the above, plus a lot more water, food, and medical supplies.

We have two cats, so our plans include them. We have 2 weeks of their canned food and include extra water for them.

They are nearly impossible to get in a crate so our evacuation plan for them is very much less than ideal. Basically, it involves 1 month of dry food and water in multile self-dispensing food and water dishes, extra litter boxes, plus leaving the windows open so they can get out in case of fire or flood. Anyone with better suggestions, I'd love to hear it.

If you can afford it, there is a nifty product called BioLite. It uses therocouple technology to generate electricity from the fire you build inside it. A bit heavy to pack out, but quite valuable for SIP.

For situations like an oncoming hurricane, you can store extra water in a bathtub. To make sure the water isn't contaminated from soap residue, cleaning products, or just plain gunk, you can get a water storage bag like WaterBob.

Note: 99% of my stuff was ordered from Amazon as they have better prices than pretty much everyone I've shopped at. If you want to try stuff out, pretty much everything is available in camping stores like Bass Pro Shops.

We have additional things to add like a portable shelter and bed roll (insulate us from the hot ground when resting). Our current backpacks are decent standard backpacks, but I plan to upgrade us to the TETON Scout line of backpacks as they are top rated by multiple sites.

If the above is too much, I'd go with this:

2 L water
food bars
LifeStraw water bottle with charcoal filter
portable first aid kit
hat
gloves
knife
matches
whistle
signal mirror
rain poncho
flashlight
1 week of medications

* Stuff Hit The Fan, a catchy term for the many potential situations that could result in loss of services.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 28 August 2017, 07:04 PM
Dr. Dave Dr. Dave is offline
 
Join Date: 28 June 2005
Location: Montgomery County, MD
Posts: 5,228
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Beachlife! View Post
I've got a go bag that I keep in my car which has enough to get me by for a week or more. I have camping gear at home and usually enough food to get me through at least a week. Water won't be an issue for me, at least not at home, as my pool has thousands of gallons even in the winter.
Isn't it chlorinated (4x more than drinking water) in the summer? To clarify, do you have supplies to filter the pool water in case of disaster?
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 28 August 2017, 07:49 PM
Seaboe Muffinchucker's Avatar
Seaboe Muffinchucker Seaboe Muffinchucker is offline
 
Join Date: 30 June 2005
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 17,518
Glasses

Ooh, I like that camp stove. I might get one.

Seaboe
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 28 August 2017, 09:47 PM
A Cat Named Easter's Avatar
A Cat Named Easter A Cat Named Easter is offline
 
Join Date: 19 August 2005
Location: Frederick, MD
Posts: 561
Default

I think it's important to point out that, while those high density food cubes are great, they have a shelf life of "only" five years. That might seem like a long time, but it can go by in the blink of an eye. Any disaster preparedness plan should include scheduled rotations of food stuff.

I will also second the need for water filtration devices like the LifeStraw. Stored water also goes stale over time and, as GenYus pointed out, you are unlikely to be able to carry enough for more than a few days in any case.

My understanding is that if you draw from a backyard pool and let it sit overnight, a lot of the chlorine will "gas out". There is a risk though, that the pool water might become otherwise contaminated without you realizing it. So you still want to boil and/or filter if possible.

Lastly, be sure that your first aid kit contains an emergency first aid manual. Even if you are extremely knowledgeable, it's good to have a reference you can go to when you're under stressful conditions.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 28 August 2017, 10:12 PM
Beachlife!'s Avatar
Beachlife! Beachlife! is offline
 
Join Date: 23 June 2001
Location: Lansing, MI
Posts: 28,056
Jolly Roger

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Dave View Post
Isn't it chlorinated (4x more than drinking water) in the summer? To clarify, do you have supplies to filter the pool water in case of disaster?
Yes, I have a water purification kit and a couple life straws. I drank right from Lake Superior with a life straw last month. It was very cool.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 28 August 2017, 11:24 PM
crocoduck_hunter's Avatar
crocoduck_hunter crocoduck_hunter is offline
 
Join Date: 27 May 2009
Location: Roseburg, OR
Posts: 11,453
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by A Cat Named Easter View Post
I think it's important to point out that, while those high density food cubes are great, they have a shelf life of "only" five years. That might seem like a long time, but it can go by in the blink of an eye. Any disaster preparedness plan should include scheduled rotations of food stuff.
I've heard that it's actually better to just keep some canned or otherwise preserved food that you regularly eat and replace than having designated emergency rations. First, it keeps things from exceeding their shelf life, and second, since you're already used to eating it it reduces the risk of any GI issues from a sudden dietary shift.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 29 August 2017, 12:37 AM
jimmy101_again jimmy101_again is offline
 
Join Date: 29 December 2005
Location: Greenwood, IN
Posts: 6,646
Default

For sheltering in place there are two other things you need.
1. Where the gas shutoff valve is (if you have gas)
2. Where the water shutoff valve is. If the water supply pressure drops you could loose the significant amount of fresh water in your house. Turn off the water main valve and protect the 30 to 50 gallons of water in your water heater and the couple gallons in the toilet tank(s).

oops, make that four things...

3. Wrench for the gas valve.
4. Wrench for the water valve (shouldn't be needed except it might have been decades since the handle on the water valve was turned)
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 29 August 2017, 12:43 AM
thorny locust's Avatar
thorny locust thorny locust is offline
 
Join Date: 27 April 2007
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 7,988
Default

I don't have a go bag; though I do have a list of things to grab in a hurry, ordered by how great the hurry is. Some of the things on the list would be impractical to store in a go bag as I'm routinely using them in various places in the house.

My plan for most potential disasters is to shelter in place. I'm on high ground in a relatively lightly populated area; I have a hand pump on the old well for water if the power's out; I have a wood stove which will heat the whole house in moderate winter weather and enough of it to manage with if it's really cold, and which it's possible to do some cooking on; and, between the fact that I ordinarily put up food in season for the winter, the fact that I like to not have to go to town for a week or two if I don't feel like it but want to have a choice of menus available, and what's probably a slight bit of a hoarding tendency, there's generally enough food in the house to feed me and if necessary several friends or neighbors for some time, as well as at least several days and often a couple of month's worth of cat and dog food, and at least several days and usually at least a couple of weeks' worth of any essential medications. There's also a significant collection of flashlights, extra batteries, a couple of kerosene lanterns and some fuel for them, some candles, and in addition to a battery boom box there's a radio that runs on solar or hand crank or plug into the wall. Plus lots of books, and some board games.

I don't have a good backup for freezers or cooking in hot weather; but could manage without cooking for a while if it's hot, and the chest freezers would stay frozen a day or two even when it's hot [ETA: and longer in the winter, they're in an unheated back hall]; after which I suppose I'd throw a cook-all-the-meat-on-a-bonfire-and-invite-the-neighbors party. I might pick up a Sterno stove -- I used to figure I'd use my old butane cartridge camp stove if I needed to cook in hot weather, but the thing's so old by now that I'm a little afraid to try it.

I wouldn't have any internet access if the power goes off. There's a reasonable chance that either the landline or the cell phone would still be working, but my cell phone is entirely dimwitted and mostly just good for phone calls.

I thought, years ago, that I'd be able to pick up a generator cheap in a yard sale in the summer of Y2K; but apparently everybody around here who bought one in 1999 decided to hang on to it. (The stores around here were posting signs in 99 saying that generators would be non-returnable in 2000; so I figured they were selling a lot of them.) I never did wind up getting one; but I suspect some of the neighboring dairy farms might have generators. They'd be using them, though. ETA: if they had extra freezer space, they might let me stash some stuff in it, though.

Last edited by thorny locust; 29 August 2017 at 12:48 AM.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Never Before Seen Photos of the Challenger Disaster firefighter_raven Social Studies 16 03 February 2014 07:29 AM
7 myths about the Challenger shuttle disaster snopes Science 34 06 February 2011 10:30 AM
The Flood Disaster in Iowa lord_feldon Inboxer Rebellion 12 04 July 2008 11:43 PM
Marx and Tay Bridge Disaster Danvers Carew History 4 20 April 2007 10:37 PM
Wedding Hair do disaster UEL Fauxtography 15 14 February 2007 10:05 AM


All times are GMT. The time now is 11:52 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.