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  #41  
Old 10 October 2012, 06:53 PM
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Thanks everyone. Between Angie's List (thanks for the reminder, Lainie) and Google searches I have a bit more information, though still not a lot. I was thinking that there was some further research I was supposed to be doing, like looking at C-section rates and outcomes or something, so I'm relieved to hear that people do make these decisions based on convenience, insurance, and recommendations.
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  #42  
Old 10 October 2012, 06:55 PM
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If you end up with more than one prospect, you can ask them some specific questions. I'd be tempted to ask some pretty detailed questions about the doctor's approach to non-progressive labor, but that's very reflective of my own experience.
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  #43  
Old 10 October 2012, 07:06 PM
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Definitely. The practice that I'm eying has 3 out of 4 doctors listing "natural childbirth" as one of their areas of focus, but we'll still be asking questions as well. It's possible we'll ultimately have to be referred to a perinatologist because of certain risk factors (and we've got a good recommendation there) but if that doesn't happen we'd like to have things go the natural route if possible.
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  #44  
Old 10 October 2012, 07:10 PM
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I recommend interviewing the doctor you choose, with lots of questions. How do they handle call rotations, what are their feelings about pain medication, what is their c-section experience, how do they feel about birth plans. I did this with my first OB, and had an amazingly good experience.

Now, for the second pregnancy, I did the exact same thing with less good results. But I partially blame myself. I asked the same questions and he gave all the right answers, but I didn't push at all and didn't really look for sincerity. He was, it turns out, of the "there, there, little lady, you don't even know what you want or need so I will humor your silly little questions" school of Obstetrics. I should have caught that! And reading reviews would probably have sussed it out, too.
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  #45  
Old 18 October 2012, 10:02 PM
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Quote:
Dear Mrs B, M needed a couple of puffs from her inhaler today after school. She mentioned that she told you and the phys ed teacher she was wheezing but wasn't allowed to go to the nurse. We are fortunate that M's asthma is mild. One of her few triggers is oak pollen. It is an issue in spring and in autumn when the leaves fall. I can certainly see the potential for class disruption. M has thus far taken her asthma seriously. Her allergy doctor is an advocate of treatment at the earliest symptom to prevent escalation. Please let M go to the nurse when she asks for an asthma treatment.
Does this sound okay because I'm just a little bit livid. M is Little Aud and she's in fist grade. Her asthma action plan is in the nurse's office. I suppose Little Aud could have asked at really awkward transition times but it seems odd for her to be dismissed twice. Do kids use their asthma a lot to get out of things?
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  #46  
Old 18 October 2012, 10:45 PM
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Can she carry her own inhaler? In Ohio, schools are required by law to allow kids to do so, although schools don't encourage it (to put it mildly -- one father I knew had to fax the school a copy of the law before they'd budge).
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  #47  
Old 18 October 2012, 10:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aud 1 View Post
Do kids use their asthma a lot to get out of things?
The question should only be if Little Aud uses it to get out of things. And if the teachers have concerns about that, they should be bringing it up to you rather than denying her treatment, right? I'd be livid too. I think your quote sounds very rational and restrained, considering.
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  #48  
Old 18 October 2012, 11:20 PM
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That sounds fine Aud. I might also CC the school nurse & if you don't hear anything in 48 hours I'd email again, CCing the principal as well.
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  #49  
Old 19 October 2012, 12:15 AM
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Frankly, I wouldn't bother with an email. I'd be up at the school, with the nurse, the action plan and both teachers. I don't think an email conveys the sense of urgency.

Also, I would not include the part about her asthma being mild. It makes no difference.
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  #50  
Old 19 October 2012, 12:21 AM
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Not to alarm my fellow asthmatics/parents of asthmatics, but my GP once said of my mild asthma "People with asthma no worse than yours die from it." And she wasn't being hyperbolic: it happened to a patient of hers.

I let the school keep DD's inhaler for a few years, but once I found out I could insist she be allowed to carry it, I did. At one point she attended school in a building that had no gym, and was bused to another school for PE -- while her inhaler, and every other asthmatic kids', stayed at the home school.
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  #51  
Old 19 October 2012, 12:29 AM
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At the kiddo's school, they are allowed to carry an inhaler once they pass a test to prove they know how to use it.

The Peanut doesn't have an inhaler anymore, but her EPI pen has to stay in the office.
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  #52  
Old 19 October 2012, 12:52 AM
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From the American Lung Association website:

Quote:
All 50 states have laws in place that allow students with asthma to carry and self-administer asthma quick-relief inhalers and other life saving medicines. The laws vary by state and each school district may have its own policy and paperwork requirements. Contact your school nurse or school officials and ask about the self-carry/self-administration policy in your school district.
After my experience, I'd recommend parents confirm what the school says by checking the laws themselves. The district DD attended would never have volunteered that her right to carry her own inhaler was legally protected.

ETA: This site describes the relevant laws by state.
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  #53  
Old 19 October 2012, 12:58 AM
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I'm ok with them keeping her epi pen. The child would forget her head if it wasn't attached, and her back pack is already 75 pounds. The pen would probably get crushed or forgotten. The nurses at her school are actual RNs and can better determine her need for either Benedryl or the pen.
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  #54  
Old 19 October 2012, 01:09 AM
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I might have been okay with them keeping DD's inhaler if it weren't for things like busing her to gym and back without it.

Or the time I went to replace an old one with a new one and it took them 10 minutes to figure out who had the key to the locked drawer where it was stored.
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  #55  
Old 19 October 2012, 01:32 AM
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Yikes! The kid's school is really good about her myriad of medical issues. The nurses take all of it very seriously. The Peanut had some major allergic reactions to something in the school (we have no idea what, despite $4000 in tests). The nurses were running all over the school, grilling all of her teachers about cleaning products, perfumes, anything. The janitors, too. All while I was in the ER with the kid. They kept in constant contact with me.

The new issues with her vision (she is at extra risk for retinal detachment) was emailed to every single teacher she has. They are so on the ball.
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  #56  
Old 19 October 2012, 03:49 AM
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Her diagnosis is "mild asthma" and I wouldn't want to scare them into denying her gym class. This may very well be the one time she would have needed this year. She hardly needed the inhaler at all in pre k and kindergarten.

Her teacher responded that if Little_Aud asked she didn't hear and that the period right after gym was very busy. She said she'd talk to DD about this. The nurse and gym teacher were cc'ed on the email. There was more and I feel like she gets it.

I'm not sure I trust herself with her own inhaler. She uses a spacer and I just don't see her keeping track of that.

Last edited by Aud 1; 19 October 2012 at 03:55 AM.
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  #57  
Old 19 October 2012, 01:37 PM
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Is the Asthma Action plan part of a legal document like a 504 plan? If so they are legally obligated to follow it, and it doesn't sound like they are, so you have a right to be angry. And make sure everyone that she interacts with is aware of their obligations in regards to her health, not just the classroom teacher. I've known of some bad things that happened because everyone was not on the same page.
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  #58  
Old 19 October 2012, 02:00 PM
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Tzarina, her schools were far better about allergy issues than asthma issues. Some people just don't take asthma seriously.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aud 1 View Post
Her diagnosis is "mild asthma" and I wouldn't want to scare them into denying her gym class.
Why would they deny her gym class?

ETA: Aud, maybe she could use her inhaler before gym class, as a preventive. I've found that helpful with my mild asthma. And it might be easier for the school to deal with it if it was routine.

Last edited by Lainie; 19 October 2012 at 02:06 PM.
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  #59  
Old 19 October 2012, 02:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lainie View Post


Why would they deny her gym class?
We had this problem with our son. The school he attended kept his inhaler in the office and when I pointed out that the field where they played outdoor sports was some distance from the school their solution was to keep him in the library rather than let him attend outdoor gym with his class . Between dealing with the school and his asthma and the school and his learning disabilities I learned fast how to be an advocate for my kid.
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  #60  
Old 19 October 2012, 02:23 PM
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Agreed, Sue.

Somewhere between not treating asthma seriously enough, and inappropriately excluding/isolating kids with asthma, there's a happy medium. Maybe the people at Little Aud's school just need to be educated.
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