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  #41  
Old 02 February 2012, 01:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snopes View Post
... occured when the patent filled out ...
Erh, how (and why) do you patent an element?
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  #42  
Old 02 February 2012, 02:04 PM
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Helium also messes with the metal naming rule.
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  #43  
Old 02 February 2012, 02:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Floater View Post
Erh, how (and why) do you patent an element?
You can't patent an element but you can patent processes for extracting or shaping it etc. There were lots of patents on aluminum processes in the 19th century -- processes without which aluminum products would still be very expensive. (However, as I mentioned in the previous thread on this topic, the earlier American patents mostly used the term aluminium, even as aluminum became the more popular version in the US.)
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  #44  
Old 02 February 2012, 05:50 PM
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'erbs and spices
Peaches & Herb
AFAICT, the proper name is the source of the confusion.
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  #45  
Old 02 February 2012, 05:53 PM
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Am I the only one old enough to remember the robot threat from Muni-Mula?
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  #46  
Old 03 February 2012, 02:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GenYus234 View Post
Helium also messes with the metal naming rule.
How so? Helios + um/ium?
Chrome -> Chromium ?

OY
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  #47  
Old 03 February 2012, 02:44 PM
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Because helium is not a metal.
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  #48  
Old 03 February 2012, 02:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lainie View Post
IME, North American English speakers pronounce "herbs" with a silent h.
Just to add a sample, this is one where most Canadians I know side with our British heritage and pronounce the 'H'. I'm not sure if the dropped 'H' is more common out East, but it still sounds a bit off to me.

Maybe we're just Izzard fans.
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  #49  
Old 05 February 2012, 09:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by llewtrah View Post
That would depend on how high you lift the little finger from the handle of the bone china teacup and whether your butler can afford a butler of his own
Are you referring to dropping the 'h' deliberately or not saying it because you don't pronounce the 'h' at the beginnings of words in general? Around here saying 'aitch' or 'erb' deliberately would be construed as weekly-shops-at-M&S posh. 'Haitch' and 'herbs' is normal, but you might end up dropping the 'h' sound anyway, making it 'aitch and 'erbs. It depends where it is in the sentence and whether you're emphasising the word.
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  #50  
Old 06 February 2012, 04:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quink View Post
Just to add a sample, this is one where most Canadians I know side with our British heritage and pronounce the 'H'. I'm not sure if the dropped 'H' is more common out East, but it still sounds a bit off to me.

Maybe we're just Izzard fans.
My Anglophone friends go for the no H in English whereas my Francophone friends tend to force the H....
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  #51  
Old 06 February 2012, 09:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by queen of the caramels View Post
My Anglophone friends go for the no H in English whereas my Francophone friends tend to force the H....
Or in my experience, add them where they aren't needed.

I (h)eat the (h)apple.

Or best yet: I play (h)ice 'ockey on Saturday.

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  #52  
Old 06 February 2012, 10:38 AM
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Say "cheese". Say "whip". Now say "Cheese Whip".
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  #53  
Old 08 February 2016, 09:24 AM
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Bringing forward this thread because I just saw a video that reminded me of this conversation.

English spelling might seem crazy and unfair, but there are reasons for how it got that way.
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