snopes.com  

Go Back   snopes.com > Urban Legends > Language

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #41  
Old 04 November 2008, 06:04 PM
Nonny Mouse's Avatar
Nonny Mouse Nonny Mouse is offline
 
Join Date: 30 April 2006
Location: Halifax, NS
Posts: 14,286
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xia View Post
I kinda like the idea of Ma~ but I also thought M&y was Mampersandy.
I'm unclear on how you pronounce a squiggly line. (Or a straight vertical one.)

Nonny
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 04 November 2008, 06:39 PM
GenYus
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nonny Mouse View Post
I'm unclear on how you pronounce a squiggly line. (Or a straight vertical one.)

Nonny
The squiggly line is a tilde. So the name is Matilda.

The vertical line is a pipe. So the name is Piper.

PS. The . is a dot, not a period.
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old 04 November 2008, 06:42 PM
Nick Theodorakis Nick Theodorakis is offline
 
Join Date: 05 November 2005
Location: Fishers, IN
Posts: 6,657
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nonny Mouse View Post
I'm unclear on how you pronounce a squiggly line. (Or a straight vertical one.)

Nonny
The ~ is usually called a tilde.

The | is nowadays often called a vertical bar, or broken (vertical) bar, but some call it a "pipe" after its function in some scripting languages.

Nick
Reply With Quote
  #44  
Old 04 November 2008, 06:44 PM
Nonny Mouse's Avatar
Nonny Mouse Nonny Mouse is offline
 
Join Date: 30 April 2006
Location: Halifax, NS
Posts: 14,286
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GenYus View Post
PS. The . is a dot, not a period.
That one I got.

But thanks to you and Nick for explaining the others.

Nonny
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old 06 November 2008, 11:07 PM
jason13
 
Posts: n/a
Default

The oldest references I found on the net are http://www.claytravis.net/glossary/index.html and http://news.ecoustics.com/bbs/messag...08/517831.html.
Reply With Quote
  #46  
Old 05 February 2009, 09:57 PM
snopes's Avatar
snopes snopes is offline
 
Join Date: 18 February 2000
Location: California
Posts: 109,620
Roll eyes Department of Pronunciation

Quote:
In the comments Corey points out that Snopes have investigated La-a previously and classified it as "undetermined". Well, all I can say is that I trust my friend's wife. If she says there's a kid named La-a in Anacostia, I reckon there is such a kid.
http://www.spectator.co.uk/alexmassi...nciation.thtml
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old 18 February 2009, 12:16 AM
moonfall moonfall is offline
 
Join Date: 17 May 2004
Location: Central FL
Posts: 3,139
Default

I don't know about those names, but I'm betting they're about as real as "Lemonjello" and "Orangejello"...with all the people I know who claim to know these kids, "Lemonjello" and "Orangejello" are becoming quite popular names.

I first heard the story as a joke rather than a "fact." A classmate was teasing that she wanted to name her future son "Lemonjello." I didn't hear the "Orangejello" part until much later.
Reply With Quote
  #48  
Old 18 February 2009, 12:27 AM
KKHB
 
Posts: n/a
Default

My daughter came home from school talking about "Ladasha" who is apparently, "so stupid she spells her name with a dash" and gave my daughter a hard time about something earlier... I don't know of course if her parents spell her name La-a (as daughter claims the girl spells it) or if she does it just to be cute, but there you have it. A genuine FOAF (I was going to type Friend of a Daughter until I realized what the acronym would be! ) sighting, in the wild.
Reply With Quote
  #49  
Old 03 September 2009, 09:35 PM
Azzizi
 
Posts: n/a
Default

What's funny to me is when someone has an oddly-spelled or strange name, but gets irritated that I don't immediatly sense the correct pronunciation of the name. For example, I had a class with a girl named, "Porsche." Even the first time someone would say it, she'd get upset that they didn't say "Por-SHAY," (not the two ways I've heard Porsche pronounced). Of course, she did this often enough that when I had to ask her something, I said her name (somewhat correctly) with the emphasis on the "shay."

The same is true for a friend who named his daughter, "Michael." The mom would refer to Michael as her son, despite having no knowledge of Michael being a girl.
Reply With Quote
  #50  
Old 21 September 2010, 04:41 PM
snopes's Avatar
snopes snopes is offline
 
Join Date: 18 February 2000
Location: California
Posts: 109,620
Police

Comment: I lived in Chile for a year, in a port city, and there was a
rumor that Chileans told me about the illegitimate children born to
sailors passing through. In Chile, every child is given two last names:
their father's and their mother's. So the scenario is: a woman sleeps with
a sailor. She doesn't know his last name, but she knows the name of his
ship, because that's where she goes to visit him. He leaves, and a few
weeks later she realizes she's pregnant and doesn't know what patronymic
surname to give her child. The common practice when this happened, and it
happened often, was to use the name of the ship. Some, who had slept with
men from the US Navy and didn't understand what the words meant, used
"usnavi."

I thought it was an urban legend, but spoke with a Mexican friend who knew
of a similar story of people naming their children based on mistaking a
fact. He suggested that I test the story by searching on Facebook for
people named "Usnavi." I found about 30, all over the world (but many in
seaside areas), with the name used as both a first and last name.

Is it true? Is this the origin of the name Usnavi?
Reply With Quote
  #51  
Old 22 September 2010, 06:10 AM
Floater's Avatar
Floater Floater is offline
 
Join Date: 24 February 2000
Location: Stockholm, Sweden
Posts: 6,777
Default The naming game

How Usnavi, Nanky and Yenifel were born

It was 1963, in the Dominican town of in the Dominican town of Cotuí, when a son was born to Emilio Garabito. The father was a big fan of an African-American singer popular on the island in those days, the sharp-dressed guy who sang "Unforgettable." He named his son in the singer's honor.

And that is how Nanky Garabito got his name.

http://www.nydailynews.com/latino/20...ming_game.html
Reply With Quote
  #52  
Old 22 September 2010, 03:14 PM
Cyrano's Avatar
Cyrano Cyrano is offline
 
Join Date: 01 September 2005
Location: Switzerland
Posts: 2,906
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by snopes View Post

Is it true? Is this the origin of the name Usnavi?
On a similar note, in French African colonies, it was commonplace for missionaries who ran the hospitals to name children after the day's saint in the calendar.

Children born on July 14 (which you know as Bastille Day) were named Fetnat for fet. nat. or "Fête Nationale" (national holiday). The name apparently still exists.
Reply With Quote
  #53  
Old 25 September 2010, 06:42 PM
RivkahChaya's Avatar
RivkahChaya RivkahChaya is offline
 
Join Date: 14 July 2006
Location: Indiana
Posts: 12,275
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by snopes View Post
So the scenario is: a woman sleeps with
a sailor. She doesn't know his last name, but she knows the name of his
ship, -snip- and didn't understand what the words meant, used
"usnavi."

-snip- I test[ed] the story by searching on Facebook for people named "Usnavi." I found about 30, all over the world....
Shouldn't it then be "Usnavy"?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyrano View Post
On a similar note, in French African colonies, it was commonplace for missionaries who ran the hospitals to name children after the day's saint in the calendar.

Children born on July 14 (which you know as Bastille Day) were named Fetnat for fet. nat. or "Fête Nationale" (national holiday). The name apparently still exists.
Not questioning your information, Cyrano, just wondering why the missionaries, and not the children's parents, were in charge of naming them. Was this the name they actually addressed by, on a daily basis, or was this just their baptismal name, that was on a record the missionaries kept, but wasn't otherwise used?
Reply With Quote
  #54  
Old 25 September 2010, 06:58 PM
snopes's Avatar
snopes snopes is offline
 
Join Date: 18 February 2000
Location: California
Posts: 109,620
Ponder

Quote:
Originally Posted by RivkahChaya View Post
Shouldn't it then be "Usnavy"?
Not if the local language doesn't typically use the letter 'y' in that fashion.
Reply With Quote
  #55  
Old 25 September 2010, 11:08 PM
RivkahChaya's Avatar
RivkahChaya RivkahChaya is offline
 
Join Date: 14 July 2006
Location: Indiana
Posts: 12,275
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by snopes View Post
Not if the local language doesn't typically use the letter 'y' in that fashion.
I thought of that, but then I thought that if a person's English was good enough to figure out how to pronounce "navy" to the extent of transliterating it, would the person's english be so bad as to not realize what "US NAVY" meant?

There's a show on Broadway now called In The Heights, which has been hugely successful, and is being compared to Fiddler on the Roof and Rent, which has a character "Usnavi," and tells a name origin story. (For SPOILER, see below.) I don't know whether this is a piece of folklore the author is using, a genuine cultural fact incorporated into the play, something true of one person the author knew, and he worked it in, or something he made up completely.

When did "Usnavi" start appearing in Snopes' inbox? The show opened in 2009, but googling the author's name (Lin-Manuel Miranda) pops up references to his working on stories with the "Usnavi" character back in 2000.

Are there really a lot of Usnavis on Facebook? Are they really people named that, or are they people who are members of an In the Heights fan club, or something?

SPOILER: The first ship his parents saw in New York Harbor when they came to the US said “U.S. Navy.”
Reply With Quote
  #56  
Old 25 September 2010, 11:23 PM
snopes's Avatar
snopes snopes is offline
 
Join Date: 18 February 2000
Location: California
Posts: 109,620
Ponder

Quote:
Originally Posted by RivkahChaya View Post
I thought of that, but then I thought that if a person's English was good enough to figure out how to pronounce "navy" to the extent of transliterating it, would the person's english be so bad as to not realize what "US NAVY" meant?
If said person truly had an understanding of English sufficient to figure out the correct pronunciation of "navy" on her own, said person would more likely have transliterated it into Spanish as "nevi" (nay-vee or neh-vee) not "navi" (nah-vee).
Reply With Quote
  #57  
Old 26 September 2010, 02:22 AM
Assilem Brandywine Assilem Brandywine is offline
 
Join Date: 07 October 2009
Location: Lafayette, LA
Posts: 294
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by starfury View Post
My cats are named Ellipsis and Ampersand. I do usually spell the names though... And why yes, I am a language student.
What do you get when you cross a cat with an apostrophe?
A catastrophe!
Reply With Quote
  #58  
Old 26 September 2010, 04:07 AM
Malruhn Malruhn is offline
 
 
Join Date: 28 November 2003
Location: Boston, MA
Posts: 7,854
Default

No, that's what you get when you taxiderm the hinder parts and mount them on a plaque for the wall. (Damn you, Piers Anthony!!)
Reply With Quote
  #59  
Old 29 September 2010, 12:08 AM
Malamuddy
 
Posts: n/a
Icon19

Growing up in the South (where there are a lot of African Americans and a lot of whites that want to point out how "strange" and "different" they are, I heard all the supposed names ad nauseum. "Nosmo King" named after a "No Smoking" sign, much etc.

I knew enough African American classmates with nontraditional names that clearly their parents did not have trouble thinking them up, and did not need to be inspired by "Lemon Jello" etc.

As for the OP, if the mother was so ignorant (which of course is the intent of all these UL's) I doubt she would be passingly familiar with the copyediting term "dash."

My favorite supposed names were for twins --- Cleopatra and Cleopatrick.
Not true, of course, I just wish it were. I want to get a dog just to name it Cleopatrick.
Reply With Quote
  #60  
Old 01 November 2010, 03:17 AM
snopes's Avatar
snopes snopes is offline
 
Join Date: 18 February 2000
Location: California
Posts: 109,620
Icon220 Girl's name really is 'Boo!'

The parents of an 8-year-old New York girl say they named her Boo! because she was due on Halloween.

http://www.nydailynews.com/ny_local/...ual_name_.html
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Origins of London borough names Johnny Slick Language 5 07 May 2009 12:09 PM
Screen names Mickey Blue Test Issues 64 10 January 2007 02:15 AM


All times are GMT. The time now is 09:41 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.