snopes.com  

Go Back   snopes.com > SLC Central > SLC

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #121  
Old 05 September 2017, 01:53 AM
thorny locust's Avatar
thorny locust thorny locust is offline
 
Join Date: 27 April 2007
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 7,766
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmy101_again View Post
It would be very unlikely that a compound on the open market that is specifically designed to be used on your body is a significant health hazard.
There are compounds on the open market that are specifically designed to be used in your body that are significant health hazards.

Too much acetaminophen will finish off your kidneys quite nicely.

Yes, the stuff can be used safely. But in order to use it -- or acetone, or gasoline, or any of lots of other things -- safely, it's necessary to recognize that it's dangerous. Considering potentially hazardous substances to be "about as benign as you can get" is a really good way to increase injuries from them.
Reply With Quote
  #122  
Old 05 September 2017, 04:30 AM
crocoduck_hunter's Avatar
crocoduck_hunter crocoduck_hunter is offline
 
Join Date: 27 May 2009
Location: Roseburg, OR
Posts: 11,225
Default

It's pretty common to have a bottle of hydrogen peroxide in a person's home for use on their body as a topical antiseptic.

But you really wouldn't like the results if you tried to drink it. Same goes for isopropyl or iodine, or really anything that can be found in the average medicine cabinet.
Reply With Quote
  #123  
Old 05 September 2017, 06:12 PM
jimmy101_again jimmy101_again is offline
 
Join Date: 29 December 2005
Location: Greenwood, IN
Posts: 6,543
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by thorny locust View Post
There are compounds on the open market that are specifically designed to be used in your body that are significant health hazards.

Too much acetaminophen will finish off your kidneys quite nicely.
Uh, I think you mean liver. (I actually do a fair amount of research on Acetaminophen's liver toxicity.)

Quote:
Yes, the stuff can be used safely. But in order to use it -- or acetone, or gasoline, or any of lots of other things -- safely, it's necessary to recognize that it's dangerous. Considering potentially hazardous substances to be "about as benign as you can get" is a really good way to increase injuries from them.
But to consider something that really is fairly benign to be the toxic equivalent of ricin or sarin or plutonium doesn't make sense either. Acetone is literally about as benign as you can get. There are many things (like gasoline) that we use everyday, in much greater quantities, that are much bigger hazards.

And back to the starting point, acetone is pretty irrelevant in the case of the exploding peroxides in Texas.
Reply With Quote
  #124  
Old 05 September 2017, 07:05 PM
thorny locust's Avatar
thorny locust thorny locust is offline
 
Join Date: 27 April 2007
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 7,766
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmy101_again View Post
Uh, I think you mean liver. (I actually do a fair amount of research on Acetaminophen's liver toxicity.)
There does seem to be evidence that too much of it's not great for your kidneys either; but you're right, I was probably thinking of liver.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmy101_again View Post
But to consider something that really is fairly benign to be the toxic equivalent of ricin or sarin or plutonium doesn't make sense either.
True. Which is why I wasn't doing that; and I don't think anybody else on this thread was doing that either.

I also wasn't, and don't think anyone else on this thread was, considering things that are moderately toxic to be the equivalent of aerosolized ricin, or sarin, or plutonium.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmy101_again View Post
Acetone is literally about as benign as you can get.
No. It's not. There have been plenty of things posted in this thread pointing out that acetone is hazardous if not handled properly. I'm not going to post them all over again.

Your posts on this give the impression that you're only allowing for two categories: benign enough to go swimming in or to serve up for the baby's supper, and toxic enough for exposure to a minute amount to be deadly. There are very many things that fall somewhere between those two extremes. Most people handle some items of intermediary hazard routinely in their daily lives. Considering those items as non-hazardous increases the hazard.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmy101_again View Post
And back to the starting point, acetone is pretty irrelevant in the case of the exploding peroxides in Texas.
That, I'll go along with. The amount of acetone produced appears, in this particular case, to be a whole lot less hazardous than the fire risk.

Whether the acetone's relevant to the fact that they found it necessary to evacuate everyone for a mile and a half around, or whether they thought other compounds might be released that were more dangerous, or whether they had no idea whether there would compounds released that would be dangerous that far from the source (unnerving if so), or whether they were just worried that the explosions would set the whole general area on fire, I don't know. But if they had to evacuate everyone for a mile and a half around, then maybe such storage shouldn't be allowed within a mile and a half of most other human uses or of environmentally critical habitat; or maybe additional safety measures are needed for such storage; or both.
Reply With Quote
  #125  
Old 06 September 2017, 03:51 AM
jimmy101_again jimmy101_again is offline
 
Join Date: 29 December 2005
Location: Greenwood, IN
Posts: 6,543
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by thorny locust View Post
Whether the acetone's relevant to the fact that they found it necessary to evacuate everyone for a mile and a half around, or whether they thought other compounds might be released that were more dangerous, or whether they had no idea whether there would compounds released that would be dangerous that far from the source (unnerving if so), or whether they were just worried that the explosions would set the whole general area on fire, I don't know. But if they had to evacuate everyone for a mile and a half around, then maybe such storage shouldn't be allowed within a mile and a half of most other human uses or of environmentally critical habitat; or maybe additional safety measures are needed for such storage; or both.
Anytime you have an explosion hazard people are going to be evacuated. Acetone is a fire and explosion hazard if aerosolized and ignited. Since that can't happen unless something else causes it, the acetone isn't the primary concern. Indeed it is likely the site has many other flammable chemicals (including solvents chemically similar to gasoline) and the total of all those organics present an explosion risk when coupled with the spontaneous explosion of the peroxides. Remove (or properly store) the peroxides and all the other hazards go away.

It is all about proper recognition and handling of risks. "Toxicity" is a very broad term and everything is toxic to some extent. The inability to differentiate between low risks and significant risks leads to regulations that are expensive and ineffectual.

For example, the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami killed about 18,000 people. No deaths were due to the damaged nuclear reactors. It is almost certain that the major regulatory changes from the catastrophe will have to do with the nuclear reactors and relatively little will be done to prevent future earthquakes and tsunamis from killing tens of thousands in coastal cities. The cities will be rebuilt but the reactors wont. In the next event another 18,000 will be killed because the wrong risk was addressed.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
3 storm chasers die in Texas car crash, authorities say Psihala Crash and Burn 5 03 April 2017 03:13 PM
YouTube Star's Dengue Fever Infection in Hawaii Highlights Dangers of Tropical Diseas Psihala The Doctor Is In 8 06 November 2015 10:46 AM
No: Photo of ominous cloud not from Tropical Storm Isaac Spam & Cookies-mmm Fauxtography 1 27 August 2012 09:16 PM
Lee Harvey Oswald snopes Glurge Gallery 9 09 September 2010 12:39 AM
'Harvey' had three different endings snopes Entertainment 12 31 October 2008 09:27 AM


All times are GMT. The time now is 12:11 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.