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  #601  
Old 23 February 2018, 10:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Errata View Post
As people have mentioned here, a "pep rally" is usually about school sports. There's not much rational discussion needed about whether your sport team is really the best or not.
I was very short on what was called "school spirit" and generally thought the whole thing was silly. Saying so out loud was likely to be frowned upon, however; by the other students at least as much as by the school administration. (I suppose larger schools probably have enough people who think it's silly to make this less of an issue, as such students could then hang out with each other. At least if they agreed, mostly, on what else was silly.)

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Originally Posted by Veruca View Post
All I remember is the booth selling candy and dill pickles, which shows what my priorities were as a child.

Errata: Interesting. I never thought of "prep" as "a kid who tries hard in school." Growing up, my friends and I mostly used it to mean snobby and/or boring. I'm sure there are regional and individual variations, though.
Candy and dill pickles? My taste buds don't think those go together.

"Preppy" to me means either "a student at a private* college preparatory school" or "dressed like or behaving like a stereotypical student at such a school". While there are certainly exceptions who are at prep schools, the stereotype would be from a family that's at least moderately rich, would be wearing whatever clothes are in style among such people (about which I have currently no idea), would probably have little if any understanding of people living in other circumstances, and would expect to be considered to have a good education and to go to a good college but wouldn't necessarily expect to work very hard at it. Would probably play sports, and think that everybody ought to.


*I have the impression that what's called a "private school" in the USA is called a "public school" in England. I might be wrong about that. In the USA a public school is paid for by taxes and anybody the right age who lives in the district is entitled to go; there may be fees for sports clothing etc. but not for the school itself. Public schools also do not, at least in theory, teach any particular religion. A private school is run by its own private board/organization; can choose who it wants to admit according to whatever criteria it wants except, at least in theory, for certain protected classes such as race; can be religious or secular; and charges fees, usually quite expensive fees, although scholarships may be available. Many private schools are boarding schools, but not all are, and some of the boarding schools also take dayhops who live locally. Many of them are for teenage students but some start in early childhood, and some students may never have gone to a (USA) public school.

--thorny -- more information than you wanted to know since approximately 1954 -- locust


ETA: I went to a prep school. I did not fit.

But then, I didn't fit in the public school, either.

-- thorny -- also generally not fitting very well since approximately 1952* -- locust



*I think I passed for normal pretty well for about the first year.
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  #602  
Old 23 February 2018, 10:42 PM
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Originally Posted by thorny locust View Post
*I have the impression that what's called a "private school" in the USA is called a "public school" in England.
It's more complicated then that, because they also have private schools. Both public and private schools are private. The public ones are older and more prestigious. So "prep school" might be a reasonable analogue.
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  #603  
Old 23 February 2018, 10:51 PM
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And to add to the confusion in Australia prep school is the grade* before grade 1.

The Australian school system is a funny blend of the US and English system. And it various a bit from state to state.

*for want of a better term.
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  #604  
Old 23 February 2018, 11:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thorny locust View Post
Candy and dill pickles? My taste buds don't think those go together.
Well, maybe not at the exact same time, but I'm a fan of each individually.

Also, my definition of "prep" aligns with yours. Like I said, the word may have different connotations in different places and at different times. Some of my friends who hated "preps" back when that was fashionable (middle school in the late 90s) made good grades, while some of the "preps" didn't.

Part of the difference may be that we weren't in New England? I think that's where the word originated, but as it spread across the country, its meaning may have gotten diluted.

ETA: "We" meaning me and my friends! I don't know where any snopesters were in the late 90s!

Last edited by Veruca; 23 February 2018 at 11:26 PM.
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  #605  
Old 24 February 2018, 01:21 AM
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Count me as one who has never heard preppy used to mean someone who "tries hard" (at anything besides looking like someone who's dressed to go to an expensive prep school). I definitely wouldn't say it was a 90's style, although I suppose that varies and has come and gone, but it was definitely 'in' in the late 70's and early 80's.
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  #606  
Old 24 February 2018, 02:58 AM
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Blimey, I've picked lots of posts to reply to...

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChasFink View Post
[D]o the British Isles not have the beverage Americans call lemonade at all? (Lemon juice, sugar, water - no fizz.)
We do have it, but it's not a "tradition" as such. Maybe in an Enid Blyton book, if somebody mentioned lemonade this might be what they meant - I'm not sure. They could equally have meant the fizzy variety. But the type you mention is not a big thing here. (There's been some growth in "traditional" - labelled as such - lemonades in the last few years, but they're not necessarily any more as you would mean than the others. They're cloudy, but still usually fizzy and sweet and bottled by big drinks companies).

I mentioned the TV programme Detectorists in the "What shows are you watching?" thread recently, and Crius of CoH has also been watching it. That has a good recurring joke about lemonade in it, which partly plays on the different perceptions of home-made lemonade against the sort we in the UK would usually expect. I had some home-made lemonade in Romania last year, and it had much the same effect on me as Sheila's lemonade has on the other characters in Detectorists.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Dave View Post
About pep rallies, before a big football (soccer) match, do the fans get together and do cheers? Or before say the big rowing match between colleges or universities?
No. At least, not if "before" means on days before the event itself. I used to row, and I still go to watch rowing events (I'll be going to the 2018 University boat race with friends next month for the first time in years, but I've been to lots of others such as Henley and the Head of the River in between). I've never been to, or heard of, an event that's specifically been to cheer people on, when there hasn't been an actual race about to happen. The concept doesn't really make sense to me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Errata View Post
I think a reasonably close UK analogue to "preppy" might be "rah". It's not 100% the same. The UK version focuses a little more on inherited wealth, while the US version focuses a little more on people who try hard in school.

The UK analogue to "pep" is "pep", though you may not find yourself needing to use the word as often.
I'd been trying to think of equivalents before your comment, and the nearest I'd come up with was "Hooray Henry", which isn't quite the same. "Rah" is a good one too, though. Neither has exactly the same connotations, and one reason for that which I'd not known until just now is that your school system isn't the same. I realised this from your next post:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Errata View Post
TThe etymology of "prep" isn't an arbitrary designation. It's literally just an abbreviation of "university preparatory school".
... We have prep schools in the UK too, but they're preparing people for public secondary schools, not for university. A traditional prep school in the UK is a private school that would take pupils from eight to thirteen, before they went on to a public school. So one reason that we don't have the same "preppy" stereotype is that it would, in the past at least, have been almost taken for granted that public figures would have been to a prep school at some point. This was less the case when I was growing up, but seems to have come back again since then.

Quote:
Originally Posted by thorny locust View Post
*I have the impression that what's called a "private school" in the USA is called a "public school" in England.
You are correct, although I've been trying to use "private school" rather than "public school" for a long time on the boards, ever since I realised that it meant the opposite in the USA. There's a historic reason why fee-paying schools are called "public schools" in the UK, but I can't remember it - I think it's basically just that; they were open to anybody who could pay the fee, which was better at the time than being open only to people who had the right connections.

Either way, you're right, a public school in the UK is what you'd call a "private school". "Private school" doesn't mean anything in particular here, which is why I was free to try to use it to remove the ambiguity. Our version of your "public school" is a state school.

These days, "public schools" (in UK terms) are usually called independent schools or fee-paying schools. Things have been further complicated lately by recent Conservative governments allowing "free schools", which are "free" in the sense that they're not regulated by local authorities, but they're also privately run, so they're not state schools in the sense I'm used to. The Conservatives have essentially been trying to screw up our education system for reasons I don't understand, and these terms have become less clear than they used to be.
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  #607  
Old 24 February 2018, 03:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Veruca View Post
Part of the difference may be that we weren't in New England? I think that's where the word originated, but as it spread across the country, its meaning may have gotten diluted.

ETA: "We" meaning me and my friends! I don't know where any snopesters were in the late 90s!
FWIW, I was in Massachusetts in the 1960's.
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  #608  
Old 24 February 2018, 09:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Dave View Post
About pep rallies, before a big football (soccer) match, do the fans get together and do cheers?
Chanting at matches is quite a big thing. The tone varies quite wildly from wholesome to abhorrent.

This is one of the more wholesome moments I think..


https://youtu.be/X7JGCegC7Ug
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  #609  
Old 24 February 2018, 07:46 PM
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Yesterday while I was shopping I overheard a teenage girl call her mom "Mother". Last summer when I was on vacation a 16 year old girl in the group referred to her mom in the same way. Has referring to one's mom in this way become a thing among young people? To me it sounds almost creepy, in a Norman Bates sort of way. But I guess the show Bates Motel was popular among that age group, so maybe it's a thing that it popularized?
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  #610  
Old 24 February 2018, 07:51 PM
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I remember in at least one of the Ramona books (Beverly Cleary) that the girls referred to their mother as Mother when talking to her. I wondered then if that was generational or maybe an Americanism. I know for me if I called my Mom "Mother" it was for the same reason my daughter would call me "Mother" as in "Mu-u-u-ther you just don't understand!"
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  #611  
Old 24 February 2018, 08:28 PM
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1. Why are DVD menus compatible with mouse/touchpad/similar pointing devices, but Blu-Ray menus not?

2. Has there ever been any attempt to introduce a standardized format for charging/fully charged LED indicators? i.e. does the LED blink on and off while the device is charging, then stay lit when fully charged, or the exact opposite? I have devices which work both ways, and I always have to stop and think about which is which.
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  #612  
Old 24 February 2018, 10:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WildaBeast View Post
Yesterday while I was shopping I overheard a teenage girl call her mom "Mother". Last summer when I was on vacation a 16 year old girl in the group referred to her mom in the same way. Has referring to one's mom in this way become a thing among young people? To me it sounds almost creepy, in a Norman Bates sort of way. But I guess the show Bates Motel was popular among that age group, so maybe it's a thing that it popularized?
I started calling my parents Mother and Father at some point in my teens (which would have been in the 1960's). I don't remember anybody ever looking at me oddly for it; but it occurs to me that I don't know whether it was unusual at the time. I may just have been being strange without realizing it. -- usually, though, when I was being strange people did let me know; though they were often less useful about letting me know precisely how not to be strange. By the time it became more common to explain such things, I'd decided that I like it out here.

ETA: Cheerleading in the USA has become a sport in itself; quite an athletic one, and complete with intermural competititons, that are often made a big deal of in the local news, at least around here. It occurs to me to wonder whether that's happened anywhere else.
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  #613  
Old 25 February 2018, 01:57 AM
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I had a very dramatic cousin who, as a teenager, would say "Oh, mother" in the most scathing, condescending tone of voice -- like a verbal eye roll. We saw it happen enough that it became a running inside joke in my (immediate) family.

This would have been the early 70s, so no, it's not a new thing.
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  #614  
Old 25 February 2018, 02:28 AM
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I wasn't using it in that fashion; and I didn't take WildaBeast to mean that the person she heard was using that tone, either. I think we're just talking about calling one's parents Mother and Father instead of, I don't know, Mom and Dad or Ma and Pa or Mom and Pop or Mommy and Daddy; but in the same tone of voice, not sarcastically.
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  #615  
Old 25 February 2018, 05:39 AM
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Exactly. All the people I was thinking of weren't using it in a sarcastic or condecsnding way, but just as a casual way to address one's parents. As in, "Mother, can we get these Trader Joes potstickers?" or something like that.
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  #616  
Old 25 February 2018, 11:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lainie View Post
Pep is enthusiasm, basically. Pep rallies are traditionally held in high schools, to raise enthusiasm for the school's athletic teams.

ETA: Enthusiasm and energy.
At my high school, pep rallies were often scheduled if the football team was going to be playing at another school, where there wouldn't be so many of our own students at the game. So the pep rally was in lieu of the actual cheering at the game.

And the term lemonade. My husband always has to ask, because it seems that some places consider lemonade to just be lemon juice and water.
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  #617  
Old 25 February 2018, 12:36 PM
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Too late to edit.

How do I find what interest groups get discounts? There are a number of people up in arms due to Delta and other companies stopping discounts for NRA members, and they even have the nerve to say that Delta is being political by stopping the discounts.

I would say that Delta was being political by having the discounts in the first place.

But if I look at Delta's page for Fares & Discounts, I don't find a list of the groups which are getting discounts.
Quote:
Certain discounts or companion fares may apply to a selected itinerary but are not available at delta.com.

Bereavement fares
International adoption fares
Military and government fares
Senior discounts (available in certain markets)
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  #618  
Old 25 February 2018, 01:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Die Capacitrix View Post
And the term lemonade. My husband always has to ask, because it seems that some places consider lemonade to just be lemon juice and water.
No sugar?

I would think that would be undrinkable for most people. I've never been offered lemonade with no sweetener.

But for lemonade to be lemon juice, sugar, and water is normal around here. Good, too. IMO at any rate.
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  #619  
Old 25 February 2018, 05:00 PM
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The stuff I had in Romania seemed to be just lemon juice and water. If they'd added any sugar at all, it certainly wasn't much. I wondered if they wanted people to add their own sugar to taste but I stirred in at least four teaspoonsful, which was hard to dissolve in cold liquid, and it didn't get a lot more drinkable.

On Detectorists, the joke seems to be that she doesn't even add water, let alone sugar...
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  #620  
Old 25 February 2018, 05:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Die Capacitrix View Post
How do I find what interest groups get discounts?

But if I look at Delta's page for Fares & Discounts, I don't find a list of the groups which are getting discounts.
Group discounts usually aren't advertised outside of the groups that they are for.
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