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  #41  
Old 03 October 2014, 03:01 PM
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Originally Posted by Luka_the_Pooka View Post
Jesus. WILL YOU STAY HOME.
I agree they should, but I wonder what kind of jobs these folks have. If they were working paycheck to paycheck with no PTO, facing the possibility of not only not getting paid but maybe even losing their jobs, I can see why they might not have complied with the request to stay home. It's not the right choice, but I can understand how they might make it, especially if they don't clearly understand the risks of ebola.

Mandatory quarantines can have unfortunate consequences, too, because people who fear being quarantined may choose not to report symptoms.

Last edited by Lainie; 03 October 2014 at 03:08 PM.
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  #42  
Old 03 October 2014, 03:16 PM
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There are lots of other diseases that no one who doesn't have the disease is being quarantined for. I can understand asking them to please stay home but it's their own prerogative. They don't have any disease. (ETremove rant...)
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  #43  
Old 03 October 2014, 03:47 PM
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I get that the risk of contracting Ebola is pretty much nil for Americans, and that even with a case here, there is no reason to fear an epidemic because of the R0 value. But I can understand the concern about this disease over other more common and more communicable diseases. The threat is a function of the potential harm times the risk of it occurring. So you have near zero risk, but you also have a disease whose lethality is second only to rabies, and kills in an extremely unpleasant way. It also kills otherwise healthy people.

Because the risk is basically nil to people living here, it isn't really something to worry about. But I can understand why anyone who is in the Dallas neighborhood, or the same hospital, might be feeling uncomfortable about it.
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  #44  
Old 04 October 2014, 12:06 AM
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It should be enough to monitor them for a fever and other symptoms, but I imagine it is safer to ask them to stay in one place so that there isn't a chance that they would be out and about if symptoms do develop.
That was kind of my point about airplanes.
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  #45  
Old 04 October 2014, 12:18 AM
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Yes, but in this case you are asking specific people who are known to be exposed to limit their travel. In the case of air travel restrictions you are limiting air travel to an entire region of Africa for all people, when the chances that any of them were exposed and happen to be in a symptomless incubation period are miniscule. They are extremely different circumstances.
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  #46  
Old 04 October 2014, 01:42 AM
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Up until 2013, the Zaire strain of Ebola had killed maybe 1000 people over several decades. Most of these deaths occurred in remote villages or under authoritarian regimes in some of the poorest areas of the world. I'm doubtful that there's enough research to say that an asymptomatic person with an elevated viral load cannot infect individuals who had close contact (e.g., their spouses, children, etc).
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  #47  
Old 04 October 2014, 02:03 AM
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There are very few diseases that warrant a quarantine even for the person who has them. People walk among us with HIV, TB, measles, the flu, etc. all the time. Yes, they are sometimes asked to stay at home but even if they have the actual virus very rarely are they forced to. We know that these diseases are transmitted by various kinds of contact. The research isn't lacking. We don't quarantine people because they might have had contact with someone who had one of these diseases. I know Ebola is scary but we need to keep Hollywood-based paranoia out of this.
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  #48  
Old 04 October 2014, 03:05 AM
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Well then.
I cannot find the other articles I read since they seem to have dissapeared from my history, but is seems that the man helped to take a woman with ebola to a hospital, then back home when she was turned away due to lack of bed space.

Last edited by Kitsune27; 04 October 2014 at 03:15 AM.
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  #49  
Old 04 October 2014, 03:06 AM
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HIV isn't transmittable through casual contact.
I don't know that much about TB but since around 10,000 people are known to have TB in the US and about 500 people die per year it would seem the mortality rate is 40-70% lower than Ebola. Also, TB is one of the most well understood bacterial infections. There's often a good chance treatment will work, right? As for flu, ideally, staff serving at risk population would be prevented from going to work if they were suspected to have flu.

Taking least restrictive measures against something that can exhibit polynomial growth strikes me as a kind of fallacious. We do do that with flu and TB, but should we? Maybe that's actually a problem. Flu and TB have existed for so long and are so endemic to everywhere in the world that we don't seriously consider attempts to eradicate them (part of this is probably their reservoirs: for flu it is often pigs, birds, etc). If we do 'soft quarantines' of individuals with Ebola, we can guarantee prevention of third generation infections. We don't have to lock people in their apartments but they should have to stay in their own homes at night (i.e., not share beds) and arrange to be monitored by health authorities before going out in public. I regularly train people on providing 1:1 supervision for sex offenders in community settings. That kind of supervision isn't that hard to arrange.
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  #50  
Old 04 October 2014, 03:26 AM
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Yes, none of those diseases are as bad as Ebola. That's why, unlike them, it's fine to quarantine people who actually have Ebola. It's not right to quarantine people who have only possibly had contact. That's the more destructive aspect of Ebola: the reaction. It's perfectly understandable and even perhaps necessary in developing countries but it's not necessary in the US.
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  #51  
Old 04 October 2014, 04:50 AM
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Are you saying that someone who has only possibly had contact with a symptomatic EVD patient is being quarantined?
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  #52  
Old 04 October 2014, 06:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ganzfeld View Post
Yes, none of those diseases are as bad as Ebola. That's why, unlike them, it's fine to quarantine people who actually have Ebola. It's not right to quarantine people who have only possibly had contact.
Is it right to quarantine people with known contact, though? Because while America is doing that, West Africa isn't, and that is the reason why the question of broader quarantines is being raised, and why a screening process of a thermometer in an airport, for a virus with a 21 day incubation period, is being doubted.

As it stands, while I'm not afraid of a huge Ebola outbreak in the States (and never was), I am still concerned that people will be unnecessarily exposed by open international travel out of epidemic stricken regions. They already have been.

And while I'm glad the CDC is confident they can control the spread within the States, right now they seem to be having trouble just removing a few contaminated linens from a patient's home.
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  #53  
Old 04 October 2014, 06:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erwins View Post
Are you saying that someone who has only possibly had contact with a symptomatic EVD patient is being quarantined?
No.   
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  #54  
Old 04 October 2014, 01:59 PM
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Default NBC News cameraman diagnosed with Ebola in Liberia

An American cameraman helping to cover the Ebola outbreak in Liberia for NBC News has tested positive for the virus and will be flown back to the United States for treatment.

The network identified the freelance cameraman on its website as 33-year-old Ashoka Mukpo.

NBC News President Deborah Turness said Thursday the rest of the NBC News crew including medical correspondent Dr. Nancy Snyderman will be flown back to the U.S. and placed in quarantine for 21 days "in an abundance of caution."


http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/nbc-new...eria-1.2786171
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  #55  
Old 04 October 2014, 02:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Photo Bob View Post
i heard my first "that guy in Texas is an agent of ISIS sent here to infect us with Ebola" rant. A woman my wife works with.

I thought about countering with "that's stupid. Everybody knows that Ebola is a bio-weapon developed by the CIA," but thought she would just incorporate that into her conspiracy theory.

This woman is a professional, highly educated person. It just boggles the mind.
Simpler counter, if the guy was here to infect us with Ebola, he wouldn't have gone to the hospital, he would have gone to the State Fair which is taking place in Dallas now.
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  #56  
Old 04 October 2014, 03:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Photo Bob View Post
i heard my first "that guy in Texas is an agent of ISIS sent here to infect us with Ebola" rant. A woman my wife works with.
That doesn’t make any sense. First and foremost, as it has been said, if he he was looking to infect people deliberately, he wouldn’t be seeking treatment. Second, he is from a country that, last I heard, was fairly absent of any sort of influence of ISIS (which is limited to a totally different region.

That is totally an aside to the silly idea that anybody would use Ebola as a weapon of some sort (infectious diseases are really hard to control as weapons) versus something that is far easier to transmit.
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  #57  
Old 04 October 2014, 10:21 PM
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For the record, I'm not the only one concerned about air travel. Ebola virologist Heinz Feldmann said in an interview last month about his time in Liberia:

Quote:
I actually think passing through the airport on my way out was the highest risk. They are bringing hundreds of people into a very confined space with a lot of direct contact, so if you get a patient into that environment, you are going to have exposures. It is a ridiculous situation. Also, they are checking your temperature three times before you get into the airport, but if you look at the people that do this kind of work, they don't really know how to use the devices. They are writing down temperatures of 32°C, which everybody should know is impossible for a living person. All the checks they do are completely useless because they are done by people who are not well trained or overwhelmed by the number of passengers. It is just a disaster, and it needs to be fixed.
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  #58  
Old 04 October 2014, 10:27 PM
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The headline of an article that just showed up on my Yahoo is that people are getting through airport screenings and getting on planes with "a lie and a lot of ibuprofen". That's reassuring.
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  #59  
Old 04 October 2014, 11:52 PM
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And yet Ebola cases aren't showing up all over the world....
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  #60  
Old 05 October 2014, 12:43 AM
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True, but the gentleman who is the subject of the OP did lie and got on a plane and brought Ebola to Texas. Apparently should he survive he is facing charges for his lies back in Liberia.
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