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  #1  
Old 20 December 2013, 06:22 PM
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Bang Head Why can't you get more than 1 month's refill?

It's really frustrating, I don't understand why the pharmacy or insurance will only give 1 month of medication at a time? My doctor wrote the prescription so that I should be getting 3 months at a time, and I used to get than but now when I pick up my refills they only give me a month's worth. It's not like it's something that I might suddenly not be using anymore, so I don't understand why they won't dispense it the way the doctor wrote the prescription. I recently had the prescription renewed (it's done yearly) and the label from the pharmacy now says I have 3 refills left when it should say 11, since I was supposed to get three months worth.
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Old 20 December 2013, 06:26 PM
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Have you talked to the pharmacist or called your insurance company? I've had trouble getting more than a month of birth control at a time when going on a long trip, but talking to a few key people takes care of it.
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  #3  
Old 20 December 2013, 06:30 PM
Dr. Dave Dr. Dave is offline
 
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Is it a controlled substance? For those, only one month at a time is allowed. (ETA I just saw that you use dto get 3 months- sorry, I misssed that- so this is probably not it.)

Otherwise, I will guess that it is an insurance issue as IME pharmacies will fill a legal prescription it if they legally can.

My other suggestion, which may not apply to you, is if your insurance company has a mail in prescription program, see if that will work for you as they generally fill 3 months with less cost to the patient/customer.
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  #4  
Old 20 December 2013, 06:43 PM
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I have one prescription which is offered for free at Meijer which only comes in 30 days when I get it a Meijer. If I want to pay for it somewhere else I can get 90 days. I assumed Meijer does this because there payback is getting me to go to their store at least once a month.
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  #5  
Old 20 December 2013, 06:53 PM
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Tsk, Tsk

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xia View Post
It's really frustrating, I don't understand why the pharmacy or insurance will only give 1 month of medication at a time?
Part of it is that they want to prevent people from stockpiling and selling off prescription drugs.
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  #6  
Old 20 December 2013, 06:59 PM
jimmy101_again jimmy101_again is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snopes View Post
Part of it is that they want to prevent people from stockpiling and selling off prescription drugs.
Is there any evidence that that is the reason? Do people routine sell drugs like statins? Why would you given that generic versions are either very cheap or even free? I can see narcotics and perhaps some psychiatry medications being resold but a lot of prescription drugs don't really have a secondary market.
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  #7  
Old 20 December 2013, 07:07 PM
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Are there really a lot of free drugs out there? I've gotten a free prescription drug exactly once--some samples of a migraine medicine when I was in college. I have very good insurance now, with good prescription coverage, and sometimes I don't have a co-pay, but that doesn't mean the drug was free--sometimes very far from it.
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Old 20 December 2013, 07:10 PM
overyonder overyonder is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erwins View Post
Are there really a lot of free drugs out there? I've gotten a free prescription drug exactly once--some samples of a migraine medicine when I was in college. I have very good insurance now, with good prescription coverage, and sometimes I don't have a co-pay, but that doesn't mean the drug was free--sometimes very far from it.
http://www.publix.com/pharmacy/Free-Medications.do

OY
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Old 20 December 2013, 07:15 PM
jimmy101_again jimmy101_again is offline
 
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... and statins. Plus many common generic prescription drugs for $4/mo.
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  #10  
Old 20 December 2013, 07:25 PM
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Meijer has a similar program, the most common antibiotics being free along with cholesterol, diabetes drugs and pre-natal vitamins.
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  #11  
Old 20 December 2013, 07:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by overyonder View Post
The link says it doesn't matter who your prescription insurer is. That suggests that you still need prescription coverage. The statins link looks like it's straight up free though.

Still, there could be black markets in anything requiring a prescription since lots of people can't afford to go to the doctor in the first place.
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Old 20 December 2013, 07:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmy101_again View Post
Is there any evidence that that is the reason? Do people routine sell drugs like statins? Why would you given that generic versions are either very cheap or even free?
Pretty much anything that is restricted has a secondary market, because there are always people out there who want to get stuff outside of regulatory hassles. Obviously the monetary value of secondary market prescriptions varies with demand and availability, so reselling some drugs is much more lucrative than others.

And as I said, both stockpiling and reselling are factors. The former is sometimes an issue because it can, say, facilitate patients' avoiding follow-up visits with their doctors or engaging in polypharmacy.
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Old 20 December 2013, 07:30 PM
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The big pharmacies around here have free drug programs, too, and they don't require that the recipient have insurance.
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  #14  
Old 20 December 2013, 07:37 PM
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Meijer requires a prescription, but not prescription coverage.
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  #15  
Old 20 December 2013, 07:38 PM
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interesting.
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  #16  
Old 20 December 2013, 07:41 PM
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The store is giving them to the customer. Insurance status is irrelevant.
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  #17  
Old 21 December 2013, 02:32 AM
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Flaming June Flaming June is offline
 
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I am a pharmacy tech, and although I cannot speak to your specific situation, this is almost certainly an insurance issue. Most insurance plans limit you to a 30 day supply of your medications, and they will not allow you to refill your medications until you are about 80% of the way through your last supply. There are usually special dispensations for unusual circumstances (i.e. vacations or dosage increases.) And if you are not getting a controlled medication and the drug is an inexpensive one, you always have the option to pay the out of pocket cost.

Why do they do this? I think it's probably financial. Insurance companies do not really want to pay for things if they don't have to -- why pay for 3 months of a drug for someone who might change insurance next month, or go off the med?

Some insurances contract with mail order pharmacies. It is cheaper for them than paying for you to go to your local retail joint, so they lure you in (or, alternatively, force you in by not allowing you to go to a local pharmacy) by offering three month supplies. This might also be an option for you.
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  #18  
Old 21 December 2013, 02:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flaming June View Post
Some insurances contract with mail order pharmacies. It is cheaper for them than paying for you to go to your local retail joint, so they lure you in (or, alternatively, force you in by not allowing you to go to a local pharmacy) by offering three month supplies. This might also be an option for you.
Under my insurance, they don't prevent your from going to a local pharmacy, but they double the cost if you continue to buy maintenance meds locally instead of ordering via mail.
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  #19  
Old 21 December 2013, 03:13 AM
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I used to get a 90 day supply from an online pharmacy because the copay was a little cheaper (like it cost twice a 30 day copay for my local pharmacy). Then I went to a cheaper plan, and they wouldn't let me do online or 90 day anymore. I'm sure that it wasn't less expensive for my insurer for the drugs themselves at the local pharmacy, instead, taking away the convenience was their way of discouraging people from the cheaper plan.

I'm back on another prescription plan now that does allow for 90 day and online again.
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  #20  
Old 21 December 2013, 06:54 AM
Gayle Gayle is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Dave View Post
Is it a controlled substance? For those, only one month at a time is allowed. (ETA I just saw that you use dto get 3 months- sorry, I misssed that- so this is probably not it.)

Otherwise, I will guess that it is an insurance issue as IME pharmacies will fill a legal prescription it if they legally can.

My other suggestion, which may not apply to you, is if your insurance company has a mail in prescription program, see if that will work for you as they generally fill 3 months with less cost to the patient/customer.
That probably depends on the state. And prescription provider. Blue cross has no problem allowing me 3 months of Ritalin at a time.
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