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  #361  
Old 09 February 2014, 10:49 PM
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Chloe Chloe is offline
 
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How could they have done any better, though, given the situation you describe? If there wasn't enough blood to alert the first people on the scene to the gravity of the situation, how is that an indictment of the forensics team, or indeed, the police once they get there?
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  #362  
Old 10 February 2014, 12:03 AM
RichardM RichardM is offline
 
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How am I saying it was an indictment of the police to say that they got off to a bad start? If anything the fact that the police refused to respond to the first telephone call about a possible burglary might be taken as an indictment of their actions. The house is in what is considered a "bad" part of town. It is a town full of college students. You should be familiar with that. The police are not expecting much more than petty theft and over partying. Violent murder is not expected even in 'bad' parts of town. So a slow response to a possible break-in where the people calling can't even say if any thing was taken is not a calling the police bad.

ETA: It is an indictment of the forensic teams and the prosecutors that the mixing of evidence prior to the discovery of the murder was not accounted for.
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  #363  
Old 10 February 2014, 12:20 AM
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The first phone call was cut off. The second happened two minutes later, and explained the actual problem much more clearly. The police responded to that one: it's hardly fair to call that an indictment of their actions. I really don't think anything you've described is a reasonable criticism, or would differ significantly from U.S. police action in the same situation.
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  #364  
Old 10 February 2014, 01:05 AM
RichardM RichardM is offline
 
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Why did the police refuse to investigate Kercher's room? Why did a student have to kick down the door to Kercher's room?

ETA: I did not call the initial police response an indictment of their actions. I said that it might be considered such except that this is a college town.
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  #365  
Old 10 February 2014, 11:47 AM
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I believe (and this is from memory, so may not be correct) that the only police in the cottage at that time were the postal police who had come about the phones, and that they were waiting for the carabinieri to arrive.
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  #366  
Old 10 February 2014, 12:24 PM
RichardM RichardM is offline
 
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I believe you are correct. They were there because Kercher's friends were reporting at least one stolen phone.
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  #367  
Old 10 February 2014, 12:47 PM
St. Alia St. Alia is offline
 
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According to all the reading I did this weekend, the Postal Police were there because two phones had been found. One was registered to one of the Italian roommates (Kercher had two phones-one for Italy and one for England. I assume she had been given/borrowed the Italian roommates phone as the one she used in Italy.)

Also, according to everything I read, Sollecito did not call the carabinieri until *after* the Postal Police had arrived. He said he had called before, but the time stamps and police testimony didn't back that up.
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  #368  
Old 10 February 2014, 01:17 PM
RichardM RichardM is offline
 
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Also, the postal police further muddled the evidence by going into the room where the break-in had occurred. Also, the exact time of the arrival of the postal police is somewhat uncertain. It is based on a CCTV security camera with a time stamp that is off by either 10 minutes one way or 13 minutes the other way.

In any case, this is not evidence of guilt or innocence. It is a fact that a phone call was made to the police.
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  #369  
Old 10 February 2014, 01:50 PM
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Richard W Richard W is offline
 
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It seems a bit much to criticize the police for going into the room where a crime has been reported. What are they meant to do when you call them? Stand on the doorstep saying "Sorry I can't come in, I know you only reported a missing cat, but it might turn out that there's been a murder in there, and I don't want to jeopardize our case before the forensic team arrive"...?
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  #370  
Old 10 February 2014, 01:59 PM
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I am not criticising them. I am stating a fact.
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  #371  
Old 10 February 2014, 02:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RichardM View Post
I believe you are correct. They were there because Kercher's friends were reporting at least one stolen phone.
No, because two phones had been found, not reported missing. ETA: spanked!
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  #372  
Old 10 February 2014, 03:37 PM
RichardM RichardM is offline
 
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You are correct, the phones were found where they had been dumped by Guede.
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  #373  
Old 03 August 2014, 04:44 PM
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Default Amanda Knox: Italian Prosecutors Confirm ‘Foxy Knoxy’ Had Ties To Cocaine Ring

Prosecutors in Italy are revealing new evidence in the Amanda Knox murder case that could jeopardize the American student’s upcoming appeal. According to RadarOnline, prosecutors have now successfully tied Amanda to a ring of cocaine dealers in Perugia, Italy.

http://www.inquisitr.com/1383561/ama...-cocaine-ring/

I've never been convinced by her version of events and certainly this article does point out some problems with her story but, c'mon, calling her "Foxy Knoxy"? We know we aren't going to read an impartial report here!
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  #374  
Old 03 August 2014, 05:17 PM
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Total junk journalism. The Daily Mail is a tabloid, not a source.
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  #375  
Old 27 March 2015, 10:53 PM
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Default Italy court clears Knox and Sollecito

Italy's top appeals court has overturned the convictions of Amanda Knox and Raffaele Sollecito for the murder of UK student Meredith Kercher.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-32096621
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  #376  
Old 28 March 2015, 11:53 PM
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Rebochan Rebochan is offline
 
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I'm glad it's over. I've been tired of the armchair forensics so many amateur "detectives" have chosen to engage in over this case because they find the suspects morally abhorrent. Even if she IS an awful person, it doesn't make her or the other guy guilty of murder. Remember the other guy? Oh right, nobody thinks much about him because it's FAR less fun to speculate about a GUY'S sex life.

In any case, the whole thing sounds like one terrible botched investigation given a bizarre life by a crazy prosecution, stretched out for years to the point where pretty much everyone's lives are ruined except for the prosecutors running the awful case in the first place.
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  #377  
Old 09 September 2015, 12:46 AM
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Rebochan Rebochan is offline
 
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Oh look, my reasoning was literally the reasoning given by Italy's Court of Cassation now that they've published their reasoning process.

Court criticises 'glaring errors' in Kercher probe

Quote:
Italy's highest appeals court has criticised "glaring errors" in the investigation into the 2007 murder of British student Meredith Kercher.
The court acquitted Amanda Knox and her ex-boyfriend Raffaele Sollecito of the murder in March.

It said there was an "absolute lack of biological traces" of either defendant in the room where Ms Kercher was killed or on her body.

Ms Kercher, 21, was stabbed to death in a Perugia flat she shared with Ms Knox.

The Court of Cassation, which exonerated the pair, published its reasoning on Monday, as it is required to do under Italian law.

It issued a damning assessment of the quality of the prosecution case, saying its high profile nature had an effect on investigators.

"The international spotlight on the case in fact resulted in the investigation undergoing a sudden acceleration,'' the court said.
But hey, someone unplugged a lamp or some crap, I'm sure that means she's really guilty and escaped justice on virtue of being pretty and white and American.
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