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Old 28 August 2016, 08:17 PM
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Default Bizarre recipes you've seen

I have a backlog of magazines from over the past few years, and mostly I'm just scanning through them for recipes or occasional neat articles before recycling them.

There's some neat ideas that sound tasty, but I've found that it seems to be a roulette game whether the recipe I pick is actually followable or not. It's happened enough times where I'll be partway through making something only to find out that the proportions as listed in the recipe don't actually come together anything like the final product supposedly ought to. This can often be fixed with some finagling and common sense, but I wonder sometimes how the things get printed like that in the first place. I mean, I guess the magazine doesn't have time to test out each recipe before they publish, but some of them are just hilariously off.

The worst offender I can recall was a recipe that claimed it would yield four quesadillas. It even specified the size of the tortilla, so it wasn't as though I was just using the wrong size. By the time I finished making the filling, it barely filled one tortilla, and I had to use the remaining 2 or 3 tablespoons to span the second. There is no way it would have made four unless the cook applied the filling with a paintbrush. (Saddest of all, the results were not even tasty)

Has anyone else come across these recipes that just don't work? I imagine food blogs must be a good source for these things, too. Some of it can be chalked up to chef's error when preparing, but sometimes it seems like someone was rolling the dice and randomizing amount measurements or even ingredients.
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Old 28 August 2016, 09:52 PM
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I'm not sure if this is what you mean but I was watching an episode of Wartime Farm and they talk about making a dish of fried bananas and bacon served with tomatoes. To me this one is definitely bizarre!

Last edited by Sue; 28 August 2016 at 10:00 PM.
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Old 28 August 2016, 10:03 PM
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I read a lot of vintage recipe blogs, and they are FULL of weird recipes. Here are a handful of my favorites:

http://www.midcenturymenu.com/
https://retrorecipe.wordpress.com/
http://dbkitschen.blogspot.com/
http://dinnerisserved1972.com/
http://theskinnyjeansproject.blogspot.com/

Also, there is this, the "meat tree":

http://dukelibraries.tumblr.com/post...mas-table-from
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Old 28 August 2016, 11:11 PM
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I think I've still got the cookbook with the recipe for eggnog that we used to make back in the 1970's.

The recipe is considerably older than the 1970's; and we learned very quickly to cut the alcohol level in half. Even with the level cut in half, we needed to warn people; that stuff was small doses only if you wanted to be able to stand up and walk, let alone to drive home.

I suspect that the original alcohol level in the recipe was meant to be preservative -- you were supposed to let it sit for at least a week after making, and there's no mention of refrigeration; the recipe says "put in a cool cellar." But I suppose it's possible that somebody just got carried away with the units, and having started a dozen eggs, a quart of cream, and a quart of milk continued on with "a quart of bourbon, a cup of rum . . . " because the units were nice and even. -- having found it, though, I see that it also says "serves 30." So it was indeed supposed to be taken in small doses.
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Old 29 August 2016, 01:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Avril View Post
I read a lot of vintage recipe blogs, and they are FULL of weird recipes. Here are a handful of my favorites:

http://www.midcenturymenu.com/
https://retrorecipe.wordpress.com/
http://dbkitschen.blogspot.com/
http://dinnerisserved1972.com/
http://theskinnyjeansproject.blogspot.com/

Also, there is this, the "meat tree":

http://dukelibraries.tumblr.com/post...mas-table-from
....and this classic: The Gallery of Regrettable Food (slightly NFBSK language, if memory serves.)
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Old 31 August 2016, 06:13 PM
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Not super bizarre, but I have a muffin recipe which makes 14 muffins. Not 6, 12 or 18. 14. I made a few times using separate cups for the extra 2 and then scaled the flour down and kept the remaining ingredients as is.

Anything which contains aspic. Aspic aspirations
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Old 31 August 2016, 06:59 PM
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As a teenager, my youth group at church put out a cookbook of recipes collected from church members. It included a recipe for Liver Salad. It was cow's liver, lard, salt and pepper, and about 2 dozen boiled eggs. I cannot even begin to imagine how foul that would have been.
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Old 31 August 2016, 07:39 PM
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Gayle, chopped liver, made from chicken livers, hardboiled eggs, salt and possibly pepper, and traditionally chicken fat though you can use a bit of oil instead, is very good. At least a lot of Ashkenazi Jews think so; me included.

So your recipe doesn't sound all that foul to me; though two dozen eggs sounds like it would call for a lot of liver, and I prefer chicken liver to beef liver for that use.
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Old 31 August 2016, 08:00 PM
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I remember a Sunday colour supplement about 20 years ago published an old Belgian recipe for Fox in Chocolate Sauce. (I think they recommended using roadkill fox if you wanted to try it). It's going to be hard to beat that one...
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Old 01 September 2016, 01:38 PM
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Speaking of chocolate sauce: I don't know whether this counts, but many years ago I tried making chicken molé without a recipe, based only on having recently eaten some. (This was well before it was possible just to look it up online.)

I no longer know just what I did; but it was, I think, the only thing I've ever made that was entirely inedible. Even the dog would have none of it.


ETA: Come to think of it, it's probably just as well that the dog would have none of it. That was also before I knew that chocolate's toxic to dogs.
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Old 01 September 2016, 01:47 PM
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I used to work sorting books in the charity shop and, honestly, I'd put almost everything from 1970s-early 80s party cookbooks in this thread.

I can't remember anything specific but there were a lot of jellied salads. Salads should never, ever be wobbly. Also a lot of things that looked like cake but were sadly not cake.

Quote:
Originally Posted by musicgeek View Post
....and this classic: The Gallery of Regrettable Food (slightly NFBSK language, if memory serves.)
Thank you so much for that link. I was cackling like a weirdo all last night!
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Old 01 September 2016, 04:42 PM
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What about this one? I remember seeing this cookbook on an early visit to Canada:

Jellied Moose Nose
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Old 01 September 2016, 04:55 PM
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I had a recipe once for canned Salsa. It was impossible to follow. I can't remember exactly why but it was vague about amount of ingredients, how and when to add them, that sort of thing. It was just frustrating even trying to read it. It called for Arrowroot for thickening. That didn't happen because that crap is out of this world expensive. Anyway, I finagled through it and used Knox gelatin for thickening. It turned out delicious. I, sadly, couldn't remember what I'd done to make it work, lost the original anyway, and have never, ever been able to repeat it.
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Old 01 September 2016, 07:32 PM
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This thread seems to be two-in-one: The bizarre (hard-to-follow) recipes mbravo asked about, and the bizarre dishes we've seen recipes for. I have an example of each:

I attempted to make pan de muerto (a Mexican bread made for Halloween/Day of the Dead) from a recipe in, of all places, a book about Wiccan practices. It wasn't until I had measured out all the ingredients and started cooking that I realized that the sugar to be added at one point - separate from the colored sugar used to decorate it - was not mentioned in the ingredient list. I had to make a wild guess about the amount, and got it very wrong. The result was very dry and hard, and not tasty.

A friend's mother once showed me a recipe for a chocolate cake with a secret ingredient: sauerkraut. It was supposed to impart a coconut-like texture.

And in response to this:
Quote:
Originally Posted by thorny locust View Post
I think I've still got the cookbook with the recipe for eggnog that we used to make back in the 1970's.

The recipe is considerably older than the 1970's; and we learned very quickly to cut the alcohol level in half. Even with the level cut in half, we needed to warn people; that stuff was small doses only if you wanted to be able to stand up and walk, let alone to drive home....
I had much the same experience. The recipe claimed to be the one George Washington enjoyed, and had as much of the brandy/whiskey/sherry/rum mixture as it did the milk/cream mixture. But I never altered the recipe: since there's no spices or flavorings (besides the booze) and only eggs and sugar in addition to the ingredients I mentioned, it didn't seem right. People who liked the taste but not the strength would even ask if I could make a non-alcoholic version. I would say "Sure. I'll just put some sugar and a raw egg in a glass of extra-creamy milk for you!"
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Old 01 September 2016, 09:44 PM
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That egg-nog recipe sounds about right to me; at most it's going to be half the strength of the brandy, so about 20% abv. If you're expecting to swig it down like milk, or even beer, then of course you will fall over, but if you treat it as a warming drink like sherry, it's fine. It's significantly less alcoholic than just drinking some of its ingredients, which are also actual drinks in their own right.
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Old 02 September 2016, 01:12 AM
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Actually, we did make a non-alcoholic version sometimes, if there were children around; and it was pretty good. I think we may have added a bit of nutmeg, to both versions.

And I guess we just didn't think of eggnog as something you drank out of a shot glass; though that may have been the original intention. It was delicious, and didn't taste as strong as it was, at least in the half-alcohol version.

ETA: you whipped up the egg whites, and the egg yolks, and the cream, all separately, before mixing them. The texture was considerably different than you'd get by dumping a raw egg in a glass of half-and-half. -- I don't think there was any sugar in it. Milk's got a fair amount of sweetness on its own.
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Old 02 September 2016, 06:54 AM
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There is a series of cookbooks call the "Australian Women's Weekly Cookbooks*" which I had a whole lot of. (My parents owned a newsagency in the early '80's and kept them all for me). They used to claim the recipes were "Triple tested" and I had no idea what that would mean. I also read an article by a famous food personality (cook or writer) on what recipes books she recommended and she said amongst other "The Australian Women's Weekly cookbooks they never wrong" and once again I had no idea what she meant. Until made something from a cookbook given to me as a gift (not women's weekly) and they had the liquid level wrong... I mean really wrong, I think they must have left out a decimal point. It was meant to set there was no way this thing was going to set. I only got rid of the book today, my parent and I are packing up the apartment as I am getting some renovation done. I would have gotten rid of it years ago but it was a gift from a favourite Aunt and Uncle. But I have never made anything else from it.

*There is a magazine called the Australian Women's Weekly and they are the same people but the recipes books are meant to be a bit more permanent all though the mags also have great recipes.
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Old 02 September 2016, 08:51 AM
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Ha, I've somehow acquired (via my mum) the Australian Women's Weekly book of The Best Seafood Recipes. She was given a copy for one of her charity sales, and gave it to me when I mentioned that there was a good new fishmonger in town and I needed recipes.

I've not found anything terribly odd in it so far apart from one of those jellied salmon mould things that probably turn up in the Gallery of Regrettable Food, and the ingredients I've got no chance of getting even in our nice fishmonger, like Balmain bugs. There are a few odd bits like "salmon and corn muffins" as well. I haven't tried any recipes from it yet, so I don't know how they hold up.
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Old 02 September 2016, 11:51 AM
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My parents had a collection of National Geographic magazines dating back to the late 1920's and extending up to the (then) present day of the early 1980's, and when I was a kid, I looked through them all, and read a good chunk of them. I remember the 1960's issues often had full-page ads for Coca-Cola, which usually included recipes using Coke. The only one I remember was Coke salad dressing, which struck me then as being very weird. Now, however, I could see sodas being used as an ingredient for all kinds of things, including salad dressing.
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Old 02 September 2016, 04:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard W View Post
There are a few odd bits like "salmon and corn muffins" as well.
Given that similar items have different names, and similar names are for different items in UK-US-OZ, I thought I'd ask. Sorry if I am way off-base:

In regions of the US, we have hush puppies, which are more or less deep fried cornbread, and served with fish. Could the dish you mention be someting similar?
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