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  #1  
Old 09 April 2017, 03:50 PM
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Read This! In Wisconsin, selling cookies can land you in jail

In rural Blanchardville, Wisconsin, say the word “cookie” to Kriss Marion and her baking buddies, and you have the recipe for a brawl.

Reynolds said, “The critics say that this isn’t about money or it’s not about competition, it’s about health.”

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/in-wisco...d-you-in-jail/
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  #2  
Old 09 April 2017, 04:42 PM
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Meh. Some states have different laws. That's federalism for you. Like all those products "known to the state of California" to present a cancer risk.
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Old 09 April 2017, 04:47 PM
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Reminds me of the incident we had happen here in Ottawa last summer when some children had some officious fellow shut down their lemonade stand. In their case all they had to do was get a permit though. They weren't being shut down because someone in power wanted to make sure the public had to buy lemonade at his stand!
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Old 09 April 2017, 04:49 PM
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I don't really see why it would be a crime, but I also think if you are going to sell prepared food commercially, (say above a pretty small quantity that would allow for bake sales, but not every week) then there should be regulations, and maybe licensing. It is about people getting sick, and if you are exposing a large number of people to the risk, then there should be some standards to meet.

I also think that more than two states regulate this, but maybe only two make it a crime. I could be wrong, but I'm fairly certain that 48 states don't allow people to freely sell any quantity of "home baked" goods.
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Old 09 April 2017, 04:53 PM
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What seemed odd to me was that the person they specifically referenced in the article was running a B&B so she's already feeding the public. She must have to meet standards set by the state in order to do that. Not letting her sell cookies seems a little silly if they're letting her sell scrambled eggs and bacon!
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Old 09 April 2017, 05:00 PM
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I know that Michigan has some strict laws on baked goods, but it also has a lot of exemptions. There is one for bed and breakfast establishments, but I don't know if it would cover what they are trying to do.

I do know that I could not bake cookies in my kitchen and take them downtown to sell.
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Old 09 April 2017, 05:04 PM
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What laws are there for bake sales in churches, schools and the like? I see that all the time here in my area but I have no idea if the organizations involved need to get a permit to conduct the sales or if there are no rules governing this at all. I know my husband has always been very reluctant to patronize these kinds of sales. I'm stocking up on fudge and brownies and he's walking beside me muttering dire warnings about food poisoning and people cooking without washing their hands and food being dropped on the floor etc. He can be a real Debbie Downer sometimes but he's probably not wrong, or entirely wrong anyway.
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Old 09 April 2017, 05:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sue View Post
What seemed odd to me was that the person they specifically referenced in the article was running a B&B so she's already feeding the public. She must have to meet standards set by the state in order to do that. Not letting her sell cookies seems a little silly if they're letting her sell scrambled eggs and bacon!
I've only been to B&Bs a few times, but they have all only had pastries and bagels or the like for breakfast. I never had the option of eggs and bacon.

ETA: And, there is a significant difference in public health considerations between people staying somewhere and eating breakfast there, vs selling baked goods commercially by the package. Immense difference in number of people consuming and being able to track them down in the event of a problem.

Last edited by erwins; 09 April 2017 at 05:30 PM.
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Old 09 April 2017, 05:20 PM
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There is a specific bake sale exception for churches, schools, and non-profits.
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Old 09 April 2017, 05:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erwins View Post
I've only been to B&Bs a few times, but they have all only had pastries and bagels or the like for breakfast. I never had the option of eggs and bacon.
I've never been to a B&B in the US but the ones I've stayed at in England, Scotland, Nova Scotia and PEI have all offered cooked breakfasts. I thought that was a B&B rule or something! Anyway my point still stands. If she is serving baked goods for breakfast as part of her business then the idea that she can't sell baked goods seems a little pointless when she's already selling her baked goods just on a plate instead of wrapped in clingfilm!

Quote:
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There is a specific bake sale exception for churches, schools, and non-profits.
That makes sense. I bet that we have a similar exemption here then.

Last edited by Sue; 09 April 2017 at 05:33 PM.
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  #11  
Old 09 April 2017, 05:31 PM
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I've stayed at B&Bs in the US and once in Toronto. All offered some hot breakfast options, usually not bacon and eggs, but breakfast casseroles or quiches or something like that.
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Old 09 April 2017, 05:36 PM
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If you ever go to England make sure you stay in a B&B that offers a "full English breakfast". It's an experience .
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  #13  
Old 09 April 2017, 06:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sue View Post
If you ever go to England make sure you stay in a B&B that offers a "full English breakfast". It's an experience .
Agree, but I'd go for a full Scottish, since I want the porridge.

I still dream of replicating the peaches & cream stuffed French toast of a B&B in the middle of nowhere Pennsylvania.

I have seen some B&B kitchens in the U.S. with the same rules as a restaurant (posting of required inspection notices, etc.), but I think it varies by state and the size of the operation. In PA a B&B is not considered a public eating or drinking place or a retail food establishment (cite), but Oregon throws B&Bs, except those with 2 or fewer rooms, in the same category as a restaurant, that is a food establishment (cite), which may be why someone in Oregon is more likely to have a B&B which serves commercially made pastries, rather than cooking on the premises.

So state rules rule.

If Wisconsin's rules are similar to PA, I could see a problem with the B&B operator wanting to sell treats outside the home. If they match Oregon and serve a cooked breakfast, they are already following the rules, and don't have to change anything to sell treats outside the home
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Old 09 April 2017, 06:27 PM
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There's probably stuff I wouldn't touch in an full English (kidneys?), but I love the idea of mushrooms and/on toast for breakfast.
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Old 09 April 2017, 06:37 PM
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When I was in Scotland, I sometimes got what I would call scrapple with my breakfast. What do they call it in the UK?
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Old 09 April 2017, 06:43 PM
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Scrapple? I'm not even sure what we would call that in the US! I had to look it up...
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Old 09 April 2017, 06:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Die Capacitrix View Post
Agree, but I'd go for a full Scottish, since I want the porridge.
The first B&Bs I ever stayed at were in England and I couldn't get over the quantity of food they served. Always a choice of cereals then yogurt and fruit and then came the cooked breakfast with toast, mountains of toast. Not forgetting the pot of tea of course . I'd never thought of breakfast as a 3 course meal before!
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Old 09 April 2017, 07:51 PM
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I remember a B&B in Atlantic City (I think) that my mom took me to when we went to the beach. The cook there was from Georgia, so we got a full Southern breakfast.
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Old 09 April 2017, 08:59 PM
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My dad, who was from KY, made scrapple. IDK if it was the same thing -- his involved bacon scraps and drippings, IIRC.
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Old 09 April 2017, 09:54 PM
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Its kind of a fried meatloaf made from sausage scraps and such.
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