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Old 29 April 2016, 02:35 PM
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I don't see that anyone else has started a new thread, so...

Today is the day! The Alaskan Way Viaduct shuts down so that Bertha the temperamental tunnel boring machine can dig underneath it (they're worried that it will fall down while it's drilling).

The closure made no difference to my morning commute, and I'm hoping I live far enough north that it won't affect the evening commute, either. I'm not sure I want to ask Tootsie what she thinks, though...

The shutdown is scheduled to last two weeks.

Seaboe
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Old 29 April 2016, 03:07 PM
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My godson had his tonsil and adenoids removed this morning. He came through the surgery like a champ and is already on his third popsicle. I'm bathing in a sea of relief. I choked up a little bit when I saw the little guy in a big hospital bed, but we got through it.
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Old 29 April 2016, 03:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Seaboe Muffinchucker View Post
Today is the day! The Alaskan Way Viaduct shuts down so that Bertha the temperamental tunnel boring machine can dig underneath it (they're worried that it will fall down while it's drilling).
I'd heard about the closure but didn't realize it was because Bertha was working again. And yeah, I wouldn't be surprised if the Viaduct falls down.
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Old 29 April 2016, 05:58 PM
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Glad it went smoothly, Beachlife!

Also glad that he got his popsicle. I had my tonsils out when I was about six. They promised me icecream for after the surgery. (This was about 1957; nobody considered icecream unhealthy, at least unless you tried to survive on icecream alone.) What they actually offered me after I woke up was Cream of Wheat.

I threw a fit. They'd promised me ice cream! Eventually, I got my ice cream. Whether they'd learned anything about keeping promises to little kids, I don't know; but I hope so.
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Old 01 May 2016, 11:20 AM
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Here's a video I worked on for a local pro-wrestler. I made the alien heads and the "end boss" that appears at the end of the film.
Warning: lots of fake blood and cartoony violence.

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Old 01 May 2016, 01:36 PM
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I threw a fit. They'd promised me ice cream! Eventually, I got my ice cream. Whether they'd learned anything about keeping promises to little kids, I don't know; but I hope so.
That happened to me too. Instead of ice cream I got red jello and apple juice. What a letdown. This was in the hospital though. When I got home I got my ice cream. I just had to wait for it. I've never cared for jello or apple juice since. I'm not sure if that's because I associate them with disappointment or with pain!
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Old 01 May 2016, 02:08 PM
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That happened to me too. Instead of ice cream I got red jello and apple juice. What a letdown. This was in the hospital though.
I'm also talking about in the hospital. Probably one reason I was so indignant is that my parents didn't knowingly tell me lies -- if they'd promised ice cream, there would have been ice cream (at least, barring some kind of disaster that made it genuinely unavailable.)

ETA: I don't mean to imply that your parents lied to you -- only that I felt the hospital personnel had done so, and I wasn't yet accustomed to adults doing that.
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Old 01 May 2016, 02:13 PM
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You got the truth about Santa in your home too?
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Old 01 May 2016, 02:21 PM
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ETA: I don't mean to imply that your parents lied to you -- only that I felt the hospital personnel had done so, and I wasn't yet accustomed to adults doing that.
My recollection is that it was my parents who told me about the ice cream and I jumped to the conclusion that it would be given to me practically as soon as I woke up from the surgery. I don't think the nurses or doctors made me any promises! It was my mom and dad trying to make having surgery a positive experience for a little kid I guess. I also got a Chatty Cathy so it was all good - well except for the sore throat of course.
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Old 01 May 2016, 03:06 PM
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You got the truth about Santa in your home too?
Your question assumes that TL's family celebrated Christmas.
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Old 01 May 2016, 08:56 PM
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I realised that about five minutes after posting it. Not too swiftly, that is! (I'd love to feign ignorance but actually it was more stupidity considering how many times we've discussed these things over the past 10 years.)
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Old 02 May 2016, 02:36 AM
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We actually did celebrate Christmas, sort of. We were living in an almost entirely Christian area, were not observant Jews, and I guess my parents didn't want us to be the only kids for miles who didn't get a Christmas tree and presents. So we had a family get together and gave each other stuff, just like everybody else. I do remember my father getting upset when I wanted to put an angel on the tree, though -- that was too close to a religious aspect for him.

And I don't remember whether I ever really believed in Santa except as a metaphor -- I certainly don't remember any shock at discovering the truth; so it's possible my parents told me the truth from the beginning about that too. (Certainly they never told me stork stories, even at a time when that was more common -- they were just evasive about details.) Or maybe I've just forgotten that particular bit of childhood.

But something as precise as 'you'll get ice cream when you wake up' is in any case in a different sort of category. And I'm pretty sure a large part of the reason for my clear recollection of that incident -- as well as the one on the first day of kindergarten, when they wanted us to write a number all over a piece of paper, but started off by saying we didn't have to do it, and then insisted that I do it anyway -- was my sense of betrayal, that an adult had told me something and was then going back on it. I wouldn't have felt betrayed in that fashion if I'd been used to it.
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Old 02 May 2016, 02:50 AM
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I blame the Brady Bunch episode from the early 70s. Among all the kids I knew, it was just 'known' that having your tonsils removed meant all the ice cream you wanted. As far as I can recall, only one of my friends had his tonsils removed and he didn't live to tell the story.
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Old 02 May 2016, 08:53 AM
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I remember being served what I referred to as "mush" and I wouldn't eat it. I didn't eat hot cereal when I was five. I don't recall if they told me about ice cream or not. I do recall hurling blood and having dried blood in my ears. Freaked my dad right out when he took me to the bathroom, then left me there alone to find a nurse. He then got thoroughly chewed out by my mom. I have not hurled since then.
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Old 02 May 2016, 09:42 AM
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Hot cereal was about all I would eat at five. Corn meal mush, cream of wheat, grits, and oatmeal were almost synonymous with breakfast.
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Old 02 May 2016, 01:56 PM
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Originally Posted by Beachlife! View Post
I blame the Brady Bunch episode from the early 70s. Among all the kids I knew, it was just 'known' that having your tonsils removed meant all the ice cream you wanted. As far as I can recall, only one of my friends had his tonsils removed and he didn't live to tell the story.
My rendez vous with a tonsillectomy pre-dates The Brady Bunch. I suspect back in the day ice cream was, perhaps, more of a treat than it is today and being promised something you didn't have often was meant to soften the blow. Not to mention, of course, that most kids who get their tonsils out are already experiencing sore throats pretty regularly so they are all too aware that something soft and cold is going to slide down their throat a lot more easily than some of the other treats kids might have wanted as compensation for being good little sports at the hospital.
  #17  
Old 02 May 2016, 02:12 PM
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As far as I can recall, only one of my friends had his tonsils removed and he didn't live to tell the story.
Do you mean one of your friends died from a tonsillectomy? That must have been quite a shock -- though, as with anything involving general anaesthesia, it can happen.

Belated condolences, if that's what you meant.

Quote:
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I suspect back in the day ice cream was, perhaps, more of a treat than it is today
It was a treat in the sense that I liked it; but I had it fairly often. The Ice Cream Man came to the house, every couple of weeks if I remember correctly, and my mother would buy half-gallons to put in the freezer. I got to pick one of the flavors, which was a treat in itself.

That probably depended on where you were; but, by the mid 1950's, electricity was common even in most rural areas of the USA, and freezers were pretty common too -- a lot of rural people did their shopping only occasionally. (Some of us still do.)
  #18  
Old 02 May 2016, 02:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Beachlife! View Post
Among all the kids I knew, it was just 'known' that having your tonsils removed meant all the ice cream you wanted.
My mother didn't believe in removing the tonsils unless there was an important medical reason. As a result, all three of us still have them. Mine [potentially squicky details in white] split fairly regularly, which I used to think meant something bad, until I talked with my allergist (a former gp) about getting them out and he told me in no uncertain terms that my tonsils were working just fine and to leave them alone.

I can tell you that breaking my jaw at 12 meant all the milkshakes I wanted, but I had to make them myself, which I considered terribly unfair, so I never actually ate all that I wanted.

Seaboe
  #19  
Old 02 May 2016, 02:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thorny locust View Post
Do you mean one of your friends died from a tonsillectomy? That must have been quite a shock -- though, as with anything involving general anaesthesia, it can happen.

Belated condolences, if that's what you meant...
Thank you, that is what I meant. It was 40 years ago now, but terribly shocking at the time. My daughter had her adenoids out last August and had some very serious bleeding, enough so that they had to call back the surgical teem and rush her back into surgery.

Which is why I was so concerned when my 3 year old god son went in to have his tonsils and adenoids removed last Friday. It was all for nothing though, he came through like a champ. He is standing three feel away at the moment and its impossible to tell he just had surgery a few days ago.
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Old 02 May 2016, 03:10 PM
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Who thinks it's a good idea to give a kid warm food after a tonsillectomy? Or any food for that matter? I had mine out as an adult, about 20 years ago, I didn't get food of any kind in the hospital. It was outpatient. I didn't eat anything substantial for several days. Popsicles were the order of the day.
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