snopes.com  

Go Back   snopes.com > Urban Legends > Business

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #41  
Old 22 July 2013, 03:31 AM
thorny locust's Avatar
thorny locust thorny locust is online now
 
Join Date: 27 April 2007
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 7,282
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeBentley View Post
[ . . . ] you really do learn to welcome the site of a Big Box store. Sometimes you [ . . . ] want to go into a place where you're reasonably sure you'll be able to find what you want and get out quickly.
That, to me, does not describe a Big Box store. My admittedly limited experience with the places is that I can't find what I want and I can't get to the department I want quickly, let alone get in and get out of the store quickly. By the time I've got to the general area of what I want I'm too desperate to get out of there to look for the specific item.

If I'm looking for shoes, for example, I'd rather go to a shoe store. (They still won't fit, but that's a separate issue.) I don't want to have to first hike through the grocery department, the "health and beauty" section (reeking of perfumes), and the housewares store (reeking of large quantities of new plastic products all outgassing assorted chemicals) in order to get to the shoes. It's not that I don't like hiking; it's that I'd a whole lot rather do it outside.

Obviously, we are different people who are comfortable with different things.
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 22 July 2013, 03:44 AM
WildaBeast's Avatar
WildaBeast WildaBeast is offline
 
Join Date: 18 July 2002
Location: Folsom, CA
Posts: 14,318
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by thorny locust View Post
That, to me, does not describe a Big Box store. My admittedly limited experience with the places is that I can't find what I want and I can't get to the department I want quickly, let alone get in and get out of the store quickly. By the time I've got to the general area of what I want I'm too desperate to get out of there to look for the specific item.
For me it depends. For things I buy frequently, I know where to find it and get it quickly and get out. On the other hand, I do recall one ordeal wandering around Target trying to figure out where the WD-40 was. I know exactly how Hank Hill felt at the Mega-Lo-Mart. (Apparently at Target WD-40 is "automotive". I would have considered it "hardware".)
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old 22 July 2013, 04:10 AM
quink quink is offline
 
Join Date: 22 June 2005
Location: Calgary, AB
Posts: 3,193
Default

My last trip to Wal Mart was like that. It took forever (well, a good three trips around the store) to find what we wanted, and when we did find the right spot, there was very little selection. The store was cluttered and glaring and messy and loud, which made it even more annoying to try to find one specific item. For things like household cleaning products I don't mind shopping at Costco, but if I want selection or I want quality, I avoid the big stores. I can definitely see where they have their place, especially in smaller towns that probably couldn't sustain many specialty stores, but I've always found the big everything stores to be a lot more aggravating.

That said, my husband works in a big box housewares store, and I don't mind that. I'm still not a huge fan of the complexes (I guess those would be the power centers), but I don't dislike them they way I hate wal-mart style stores. I guess that if I want to shop for a unique decor item or a well fitting shirt, or get my shoes properly fitted, I'll go for the specialty stores. If I have something specific in mind and I already know what I'm going for, the big stores work just as well and will sometimes be a little more convenient, even if getting to them isn't.
Reply With Quote
  #44  
Old 22 July 2013, 04:12 AM
mags's Avatar
mags mags is offline
 
Join Date: 23 February 2006
Location: Springboro, OH
Posts: 5,104
Default

I know of two failed or failing enclosed malls around here.

The first has been razed. It was the mall we always shopped in when I was growing up. The surrounding area became increasingly poor and increasingly dangerous over the years, and the mall/police did not take security of shoppers seriously enough. Those who didn't live in the surrounding area stopped going (I started driving an extra half-hour to a safer mall), and the ones unfortunate enough to live nearby either couldn't afford to support the mall, or were outright shoplifting. It eventually lost all but one of its anchor stores. The remaining one actually stuck around for awhile after the rest of the mall was flattened, but it has since left as well. The loss of the mall certainly didn't improve the surrounding area, and there are now semi-frequent shootings reported.

The other mall has lost all but one of its anchors (actually, I'm not certain the one is still there but its signage is). I haven't been inside the mall for several years so I'm not sure what the state is there, but last I was there at least half the storefronts were empty. It is also in a poorer area, but not as poor or high crime as the other. The mall is flanked by a Meijer and a new Kroger Marketplace (sort of an upscale grocery plus home goods). Both those stores are very busy. The nearby Walmart also does well, although I think the Target down that way does worse than others around here.

At the moment, there is another mall around here that has been trying to block bus stops being added nearby. There is some fear that if you let "the poor" in, they will increase crime and theft, the current patrons will stop going, and it will go downhill like the first mall I mentioned. I personally don't feel this is an issue. The mall I most frequently go to now had a worse reputation for crime (gangs, mostly) when I was a child than the one that eventually failed had at that time, but they took security seriously, and managed to turn their image around. It is still doing very healthy business, even with bus stops.
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old 22 July 2013, 04:31 AM
quink quink is offline
 
Join Date: 22 June 2005
Location: Calgary, AB
Posts: 3,193
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mags View Post
At the moment, there is another mall around here that has been trying to block bus stops being added nearby. There is some fear that if you let "the poor" in, they will increase crime and theft, the current patrons will stop going, and it will go downhill like the first mall I mentioned. I personally don't feel this is an issue. The mall I most frequently go to now had a worse reputation for crime (gangs, mostly) when I was a child than the one that eventually failed had at that time, but they took security seriously, and managed to turn their image around. It is still doing very healthy business, even with bus stops.
That is really, really depressing

We just built a new LRT line, and there was a little bit of pushback from the communities the train was traveling through because they thought it would bring crime along with it. Instead, property values have skyrocketed, because a direct route into downtown is worth a lot.

I think a lot of the shopping thing depends on what you're used to. Someone looking at a pedestrian plaza from the perspective of a driver would probably find it irritating to get around. I had an experience on a business trip to a smaller city like that. I ended up staying in a hotel on the outskirts of town in the middle of several big box complexes. It was right after I had started trying to eat healthier, so I thought I'd go for a little walk to pick up a healthy dinner to bring back to my hotel. Almost an hour and a half later, I'd hiked through four different complexes, including getting up to my ankle in ditch water, come within a couple feet of being hit by a truck while (legally) crossing the street, and the only thing I could find that was remotely healthy was an unappealing bag of cut veggies from wal-mart and a microwavable dinner. It was an absolutely miserable night, and it really opened my eyes to why so many people find it difficult to be healthy and active in cities that aren't set up for it. The dumb thing is that I did have a car - it just never occurred to me to use it to go pick up dinner a few blocks away (or for that matter, to drive into town where I could have found better eating options).
Reply With Quote
  #46  
Old 22 July 2013, 04:39 AM
WildaBeast's Avatar
WildaBeast WildaBeast is offline
 
Join Date: 18 July 2002
Location: Folsom, CA
Posts: 14,318
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by quink View Post
We just built a new LRT line, and there was a little bit of pushback from the communities the train was traveling through because they thought it would bring crime along with it.
Hijacking the thread away from malls, but I have a coworker who opposes any sort of expansion of public transit for that reason. He thinks the light rail trains will bring the "riff raff" (that's the word he actually used) into our community. Because anyone who doesn't drive must be poor.
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old 22 July 2013, 05:02 AM
mags's Avatar
mags mags is offline
 
Join Date: 23 February 2006
Location: Springboro, OH
Posts: 5,104
Default

Around here, it is so difficult (where I live, nearly impossible) to get around without a car, even the fairly poor drive. It is a pretty fair assumption one wouldn't put up with having to use the buses, especially for shopping, if they didn't absolutely have to.

The bus stops at the mall have been a big debate here for awhile. Most recently, I think it was brought to the courts. There was an opinion page in last week's paper that included views from many locals. Several comments were made to try to justify opposition to the stops for reasons other than the clear classist (if not entirely racist) objections that are the overwhelming undercurrent (one tried to say the problem was that the buses are supported by taxes in one county and will be used to take shoppers' money to a different county). One comment was pretty humorous, and true. It mentioned that the big problem most people bring up is that having the bus stops will increase crime and theft. They then pointed out the ridiculousness of mugging someone or stealing something, and waiting around for the bus as your getaway car.
Reply With Quote
  #48  
Old 22 July 2013, 12:28 PM
Lainie's Avatar
Lainie Lainie is online now
 
Join Date: 29 August 2005
Location: Suburban Columbus, OH
Posts: 72,766
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cervus View Post
Here, some older strip malls have a grocery store or Kmart as the "anchor store", but some don't have anchor stores at all. But essentially it's the same concept as the town center or "power center": a strip of stores and cafes that face a parking lot. I guess the "small town Main Street" concept isn't popular here (yet).
The "town center" malls around here are not a strip of stores and cafes facing a parking lot, although we do have those. They're built like a town, with stores and restaurants facing a grid of multiple streets.

ETA: Images of Easton Town Center, a "town center" style mall built in the Columbus area around 2000.

Last edited by Lainie; 22 July 2013 at 12:33 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #49  
Old 22 July 2013, 04:49 PM
Keeper of the Mad Bunnies's Avatar
Keeper of the Mad Bunnies Keeper of the Mad Bunnies is offline
 
Join Date: 07 January 2003
Location: Detroit, MI
Posts: 1,191
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Beachlife! View Post
With the economy the way it is, Michigan isn't building many new malls these days. The last one that I am familiar with was built in 2003. It was not enclosed which I thought and still thing was foolish. The last enclosed mall I am aware of was built in 1999.

What I later found out is that the current trend is malls is to create something that emulates a town center. These are always open mall. I would guess they are also cheaper to build and update.
The latest to open in SE Michigan was in 2007 - Partridge Creek. Open air, Town Center type of mall.
Reply With Quote
  #50  
Old 25 July 2013, 04:33 PM
dewey dewey is offline
 
Join Date: 12 October 2000
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 2,784
Default

The South Shore Plaza in Braintree, MA was greatly expanded in 2010. Not a new mall but certainly an indication of growth. This mall, by the way, was the site of Paul Blart: Mall Cop. It is one of the original malls in New England and is currently the largest.

dewey
Reply With Quote
  #51  
Old 25 July 2013, 05:01 PM
Lachrymose's Avatar
Lachrymose Lachrymose is offline
 
Join Date: 31 March 2007
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 1,818
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lainie View Post
The "town center" malls around here are not a strip of stores and cafes facing a parking lot, although we do have those. They're built like a town, with stores and restaurants facing a grid of multiple streets.
Interestingly enough, two of the handful of fully enclosed malls that are left around here are actually labeled as "town centers."
Reply With Quote
  #52  
Old 25 July 2013, 11:16 PM
crocoduck_hunter's Avatar
crocoduck_hunter crocoduck_hunter is offline
 
Join Date: 27 May 2009
Location: Roseburg, OR
Posts: 10,950
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dewey View Post
The South Shore Plaza in Braintree, MA was greatly expanded in 2010. Not a new mall but certainly an indication of growth. This mall, by the way, was the site of Paul Blart: Mall Cop. It is one of the original malls in New England and is currently the largest.

dewey
How does it compare to the King of Prussia double mall in Pennsylvania? I remember when I was a kid that both of the malls together were supposed to be bigger than any other mall in the US, though I think this was also before the Mall of America opened.
Reply With Quote
  #53  
Old 26 July 2013, 12:20 AM
DrRocket's Avatar
DrRocket DrRocket is offline
 
Join Date: 03 February 2006
Location: Rosemount, MN
Posts: 2,051
Default

If you're ever in Kansas City, there's the Country Club Plaza. It was designed in 1922 as the nation's first suburban shopping district. The buildings all share a common Spanish architecture theme, although I do not know how authentic it is.

As a kid, I lived reasonably close to it, and spent some time there.
Reply With Quote
  #54  
Old 26 July 2013, 01:18 AM
Errata's Avatar
Errata Errata is offline
 
Join Date: 02 August 2005
Location: Santa Barbara, CA
Posts: 12,891
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by crocoduck_hunter View Post
How does it compare to the King of Prussia double mall in Pennsylvania? I remember when I was a kid that both of the malls together were supposed to be bigger than any other mall in the US, though I think this was also before the Mall of America opened.
Do you happen to know how it ended up as a "double mall" instead of one big mall? Couldn't find a contiguous plot of land to expand the first one into? A merger of nearby competitors? I've never heard the term before, so I'm curious what the story behind it is.
Reply With Quote
  #55  
Old 26 July 2013, 02:29 AM
crocoduck_hunter's Avatar
crocoduck_hunter crocoduck_hunter is offline
 
Join Date: 27 May 2009
Location: Roseburg, OR
Posts: 10,950
Default

According to the Wikipedia page, it started as one mall (The Plaza at King of Prussia), the second part was built next door (The Court at King of Prussia), and in the 90s the two were officially joined by a pedestrian bridge. Wiki also lists it as being the largest mall in the US in terms of leasable retail space. The name comes from it being located in the King of Prussia township. And from the description on the page about growth, it sounds like it's doing pretty well.
Reply With Quote
  #56  
Old 26 July 2013, 04:01 AM
Sylvanz's Avatar
Sylvanz Sylvanz is offline
 
Join Date: 23 June 2001
Location: Michigan
Posts: 7,812
Default

In the 70's our town did the opposite of what is trending now: we tore down our main street (instead of repairing the crumbling historic buildings) and built a "mall". It is, and pretty much always has been, a blight. It has a fountain that has been shut off. The utilities are not affordable for most businesses. AFAIK, there is a Rite Aid, a Family dollar (with no direct mall access), a physical therapist, an insurance company, and a couple of salons. I haven't actually gone in the thing in months, so there may be more or less. It hasn't been updated since it was built. It is ugly, expensive, and a huge waste of space. Most people in town would like to see it plowed under and a new main street built. This will probably never happen due to the expense, how small the town is, and the economy.
Reply With Quote
  #57  
Old 26 July 2013, 06:58 AM
BrianB's Avatar
BrianB BrianB is offline
 
Join Date: 03 March 2000
Location: Camarillo, CA
Posts: 3,500
Australia Technically new but....

Westfield is building the Westfield World Trade Center, which is an urban indoor mall. It's scheduled to open in 2015. Here's a video of what it will look like. However, I won't dispute anyone who argues it's not truly new since it's a replacement for the original one destroyed in 9/11.

Brian
Reply With Quote
  #58  
Old 26 July 2013, 12:56 PM
hambubba's Avatar
hambubba hambubba is offline
 
Join Date: 30 June 2000
Location: Gonzales, LA
Posts: 10,715
Default

Our newest mall is trying to overcome the stigma of the older mall. We've seen one torn down due to drug activity and crime. The next mall is, sadly, now a mall where nobody white goes. The neighborhoods and area have all changed. The newer mall (in the presumably richer section, lol) this last year had gangs of teens that would gather for fun, in the hundreds, and basically scare the crap out of anyone shopping. We've even had two movie theaters close for the same reasons.

Interesting though, the new mall has an enclosed area, then an outside shopping section that is really nice. A competitive open air mall a mile away is completely old town style, even has apartments.

A neighboring town revamped their enclosed mall, and took the roof off. It's hard to see where the original buildings were, but there is a drive straight through the middle of where the mall was.

We are thankful to live out of town - the crime rate in Baton Rouge is through the roof.
Reply With Quote
  #59  
Old 26 July 2013, 01:27 PM
Mad Jay's Avatar
Mad Jay Mad Jay is offline
 
Join Date: 19 July 2003
Location: Virginia
Posts: 13,464
Default

Rather than rebuild the mall, they should have activities that keep the kids busy. IMO, people congregate at the mall (espescially enclosed malls) when there is literally nothing else to do in the town. It's airconditioned. Even if it's not the cleanest, it beats sitting in the hot sun. You are a teenager, and it's summer vacation, the mall simply becomes the most convenient place to hang out.
Reply With Quote
  #60  
Old 26 July 2013, 02:05 PM
dfresh dfresh is offline
 
Join Date: 11 November 2005
Location: Oxford, PA
Posts: 3,652
Default

The localish mall (Christiana Mall in Delaware) said that no kids are allowed in without an adult after 5 PM. That has really cut back on the problems of young people just hanging out and causing trouble. It seems to have worked since the mall has expanded, and is expanding more, and adding a couple of new sections.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Church built from the bones of Muslims Jenn Fauxtography 5 17 September 2010 07:56 AM
Not built to scale snopes Science 1 19 June 2008 03:29 PM
New Orleans homicides up 30% over 2006 level snopes Hurricane Katrina 0 13 January 2008 01:55 AM
1973 vs. 2006 Sister Ray Inboxer Rebellion 93 07 August 2007 08:12 PM


All times are GMT. The time now is 12:03 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.