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  #21  
Old 10 January 2007, 09:14 AM
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Richard W Richard W is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Class Bravo View Post
This one just sounds bogus. I'm sure that a significant portion of these crimes are indeed performed by family members and/or friends, but 98%? And not even just family members or friends, but *close* family members and friends?
And shouldn't it be former friend...?
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  #22  
Old 10 January 2007, 10:41 PM
Class Bravo
 
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One would think so, but you never know.
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  #23  
Old 11 January 2007, 06:41 AM
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Originally Posted by TB Tabby View Post
I've heard that story before. It's told in detail in Uncle JOhn's Bathroom Reader Plunges Into the Presidency:
Edwin Booth Saved Robert Todd Lincoln's Life has the story, too.
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  #24  
Old 11 January 2007, 07:10 AM
Alchemy Alchemy is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Class Bravo View Post
This one just sounds bogus. I'm sure that a significant portion of these crimes are indeed performed by family members and/or friends, but 98%? And not even just family members or friends, but *close* family members and friends?
http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/cvict_c.htm

Quote:
Victim/offender relationship

Males were more likely to be violently victimized by a stranger than a nonstranger, and females were more likely to be victimized by a friend, an acquaintance, or an intimate.

During 2005 --

* About seven in ten female rape or sexual assault victims stated the offender was an intimate, other relative, a friend or an acquaintance.

* Seventy-four percent of males and 48% of females stated the individual(s) who robbed them was a stranger.

Intimates were identified by the victims of workplace violence as the perpetrator in about 1% of all workplace violent crime. About 40% of the victims of nonfatal violence in the workplace reported that they knew their offender.

For murder victims, 43% were related to or acquainted with their assailants; 14% of victims were murdered by strangers, while 43% of victims had an unknown relationship to their murderer in 2002.

Two thirds of murders of children under the age of 5 were committed by a parent or other family member.
Interesting that the victim/offender relationship in 43% of murders was unknown . . . seems reasonably possible that they were known in well over half the cases.

But 98% is one of the 83% of statistics which are made up on the spot. Thirty-two percent of people know that.
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  #25  
Old 11 January 2007, 07:21 AM
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Originally Posted by sandycheeks View Post
211. Truck driving is the most dangerous occupation by accidental deaths (799 in 2001).
I heard it was taxi driving.

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Originally Posted by sandycheeks View Post
219. If you plant an apple seed, it is almost guaranteed to grow a tree of a different type of apple.
True -- apples do not grow true to type, which is why there are so many varieties in existance (Ben Watson, Cider: Hard and Sweet, pg 34-36).

Quote:
Originally Posted by sandycheeks View Post
266. Johnny Appleseed planted apples so that people could use apple cider to make alcohol.
Cider (which is alcoholic, not used to make alcohol) was one of the most popular apple products in the 18th and 19th centuries. People drank an average of 35 gallons each year (Watson, pg 25).

Johnny Appleseed went west to preach Swedenborgianism and plant apples from seeds gathered from cider mills to provide root stock to graft on existing cultivars (Annie Proulx, Cider, pg 97).
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  #26  
Old 11 January 2007, 01:18 PM
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Brad from Georgia Brad from Georgia is offline
 
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Another exception to 147: The Incredibles.

And if a jellyfish is 95% water, remember the ocean is about .0095% jellyfish. It evens out.
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  #27  
Old 11 January 2007, 01:37 PM
dave748 dave748 is offline
 
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19. A "2 by 4" is really 1 1/2 by 3 1/2.
not in Australia, it's actually a 50mm x 100mm (1.97 x 3.94), unless you can find a sawmill willing to do a custom cut of wood for you at 2" x 4" (50.8mm x 101.6mm).

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56. The international telephone dialing code for Antarctica is 672
didn't need to be told this. I don't know anyone in Antartica, and if I did, my phone book actually has it listed anyway.
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  #28  
Old 11 January 2007, 02:14 PM
F Minor F Minor is offline
 
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Quote:
241. The average person falls asleep in seven minutes.
If this is even close to being true, I think I have insomnia.
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  #29  
Old 12 January 2007, 02:27 PM
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I've tried to remove most of those already covered in this thread or that are obviously true or fales. No doubt we've been over a lot of these many times on the old board, but for the sake of starting anew, I give you

Peanuts are one of the ingredients of dynamite.
The national anthem of Greece has 158 verses. (No one in Greece has memorized all 158 verses.)
There are 293 ways to make change for a dollar.
The average secretary's left hand does 56% of the typing.
A shark is the only fish that can blink with both eyes.
There are more chickens than people in the world.
Two-thirds of the world's eggplant is grown in New Jersey.
The longest one-syllable word in the English language is "screeched."
All of the clocks in the movie Pulp Fiction are stuck on 4:20.
No word in the English language rhymes with month, orange, silver or purple.
"Dreamt" is the only English word that ends in the letters "mt".
All 50 states are listed across the top of the Lincoln Memorial on the back of the $5.00 bill
Almonds are members of the peach family.
Winston Churchill was born in a ladies' room during a dance.
Maine is the only state whose name is just one syllable.
There are only four words in the English language which end in "-dous": tremendous, horrendous, stupendous, and hazardous.
Los Angeles's full name is "El Pueblo de Nuestra Senora la Reina de los Angeles de Porciuncula". And can be abbreviated to 3.63% of its size -- "L.A."
A cat has 32 muscles in each ear.
An ostrich's eye is bigger than it's brain.
Tigers have striped skin, not just striped fur.
In most advertisements, including newspapers, the time displayed on a watch is 10:10.
Al Capone's business card said he was a used furniture dealer.
The only real person to be a Pez head was Betsy Ross.
When the University of Nebraska Cornhuskers play football at home, the stadium becomes the state's third largest city.
The characters Bert and Ernie on Sesame Street were named after Bert the cop and Ernie the taxi driver in Frank Capra's "It's A Wonderful Life"
A dragonfly has a lifespan of 24 hours.
A goldfish has a memory span of three seconds.
A dime has 118 ridges around the edge.
On an American one-dollar bill, there is an owl in the upper left-hand corner of the "1" encased in the "shield" and a spider hidden in the front upper right-hand corner.
The giant squid has the largest eyes in the world.
In England, the Speaker of the House is not allowed to speak.
The microwave was invented after a researcher walked by a radar tube and a chocolate bar melted in his pocket.
John Lennon's first girlfriend was named Thelma Pickles.
'Stewardesses' is the longest word that is typed with only the left hand.


Quote:
When the University of Nebraska Cornhuskers play football at home, the stadium becomes the state's third largest city.
A stadium isn't a city, but this is probably "true" in a lot of largely rural states. West Virginia University's Milan Puskar Stadium has a capacity well beyond the population of any city in the state. Charleston, with a population of 51k, is the only one even close. The record attendence for a WVU home football game is over 70k when standing room was allowed. Official capacity is 60,500, which is still well beyond the population of Charleston.
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  #30  
Old 12 January 2007, 02:57 PM
DaGuyWitBluGlasses DaGuyWitBluGlasses is offline
 
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Quote:
Peanuts are one of the ingredients of dynamite.
THere's more than one recipe to make dynamite, there might be a recipe that call for peanut oil, no that i've found it, but you can be certain that (some amount of) dynamite is made without peanut oil
Quote:
The national anthem of Greece has 158 verses. (No one in Greece has memorized all 158 verses.)
You would think 158 might be too much, yet many people have several hundred songs memorize, if you don't ask every single person in greece, how would you know for certain?

Quote:
There are 293 ways to make change for a dollar.
False actually, there's only 292, (there are 293 combinations of coins (01,05,10,25,50,100 cent coins) but one of those combinations is one one dollar coin, which is certainly not making change for a dollar.

Quote:
The average secretary's left hand does 56% of the typing.
I would think it's a little more than that, but it is a problem with a QWERTY keyboard, or perhaps those that use DVORAK keyboards are bringing the average down, this of course is all assuming that we're talking about english typing secretaries.

On the other hand, it might be false, if you consider data entry people secreteries, as the numpad is used with the right hand

Quote:
The longest one-syllable word in the English language is "screeched."
Tied with scratched, scrounged, scrunched, stretched, straights strengths

Quote:
No word in the English language rhymes with month, orange, silver or purple.
Majorly False here, month yes, orange only doesn't ahve rhymes if you pronounce it as a single syllable, (two syllable rhyme with either Fringe or Plunge) Purple has thousandes of rhymes (apple, people) Silver has one double syllable rhyme (quicksilver)

Quote:
"Dreamt" is the only English word that ends in the letters "mt".
Adreamt, undreamt


Quote:
There are only four words in the English language which end in "-dous": tremendous, horrendous, stupendous, and hazardous.
"annelidous." (zoological)

Quote:
A goldfish has a memory span of three seconds.
Memory as a whole, definitely false, though, it can be a challenge to tell the difference between short-term memory and long term memory, so it might be possible that a gold-fish has a 3 second short-term memory, (i.e. anything it remember for a 10 seconds later, it will also remember for an hour or day later, usually)

Quote:
'Stewardesses' is the longest word that is typed with only the left hand.
reverberated
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  #31  
Old 12 January 2007, 03:25 PM
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Andrew of Ware Andrew of Ware is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Elwood View Post
Winston Churchill was born in a ladies' room during a dance.
Sorry, this is not true. Churchill's mother unexpectedly went into labour during a dance at Blenheim Palace. She was taken to a room off the main hall which was being used as temporarily as a cloakroom. It was normally a small private room. Churchill was born the following day when the room was no longer in use as a cloakroom, it having reverted to a small, personal room. (Part of the confusion is that 'cloakroom' is sometimes used as a euphamism for a ladies' toilet.)

Above information from 'History Debunked. I am at work so I cannot give further details, sorry.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Elwood View Post
In England, the Speaker of the House is not allowed to speak.
He is allowed to speak (often just to shout, Order, order!) but cannot make speeches (i.e. speeches in favour or against a bill).

Oh, and I think the use of 'England' may upset the non-English British people!
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  #32  
Old 12 January 2007, 03:33 PM
Victoria J
 
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Quote:
7. 98% of all murders and rapes are by a close family member or friend of the victim.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Class Bravo View Post
This one just sounds bogus. I'm sure that a significant portion of these crimes are indeed performed by family members and/or friends, but 98%? And not even just family members or friends, but *close* family members and friends?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard W View Post
And shouldn't it be former friend...?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Class Bravo View Post
One would think so, but you never know.
I think we can be fairly certain in the case of the murder victims....

Victoria - - J
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  #33  
Old 15 January 2007, 04:35 AM
BamaRainbow BamaRainbow is offline
 
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317. Shakespeare and Cervantes died on the same day, April 23, 1616.


Well, this isn't quite so clear cut. They may have died the same date, but they didn't die the same day. Cervantes died under the Gregorian Calendar, while Shakespeare died under the Julian Calendar, and there was (at the time) a 10 day discrepancy between the two calendars. When Cervantes died in Spain on April 23, it was April 13 in England. When Shakespeare died in England on April 23, it was May 3 in Spain.
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  #34  
Old 15 January 2007, 10:23 AM
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Dactyl Dactyl is offline
 
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Quote:
Quote:
No word in the English language rhymes with month, orange, silver or purple.

Majorly False here, month yes, orange only doesn't ahve rhymes if you pronounce it as a single syllable, (two syllable rhyme with either Fringe or Plunge) Purple has thousandes of rhymes (apple, people) Silver has one double syllable rhyme (quicksilver)
If we're talking 'perfect' rhyme here, then two words rhyme if their final stressed vowel and all following sounds are identical.

On that basis:

Orange doesn't rhyme with Fringe nor Plunge.
Purple rhymes with neither apple nor people.

And I think rhyming silver with silver is cheating.
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  #35  
Old 15 January 2007, 01:35 PM
DaGuyWitBluGlasses DaGuyWitBluGlasses is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dactyl View Post
If we're talking 'perfect' rhyme here, then two words rhyme if their final stressed vowel and all following sounds are identical.

On that basis:

Orange doesn't rhyme with Fringe nor Plunge.
Purple rhymes with neither apple nor people.

And I think rhyming silver with silver is cheating.
Actually, with the I sound, orange can be pronounced double stressed, so it can still have a perfect rhyme with fringe, binge etc.. (but not with lunge, plunge etc.)

But double rhymes are often considered childish. And of course, the differences of pronounciations make the perfect rhyme debate fairly odd for english.
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  #36  
Old 15 January 2007, 06:22 PM
YoShIe
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Elwood View Post
In most advertisements, including newspapers, the time displayed on a watch is 10:10.
I believe that this only applies to non-digital watches (those with an hour & minute hand). According to David Feldman's "Imponderables", this practice was originally started in the 1920s. Placing the watch hands at or near 10:10 gives the face a clean, symmetrical look while not obscuring the watchmaker's insignia which is usually printed directly below 12 o'clock.

This is not universal, however, as not every company prints their logo in the same location (I went to several "big chain" websites and found watches for with the logo on the bottom or side of the watch face, or not printed at all). Thus, on these watches it is likely done more out of tradition than anything else.
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  #37  
Old 15 January 2007, 07:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by YoShIe View Post
I believe that this only applies to non-digital watches (those with an hour & minute hand). According to David Feldman's "Imponderables", this practice was originally started in the 1920s. Placing the watch hands at or near 10:10 gives the face a clean, symmetrical look while not obscuring the watchmaker's insignia which is usually printed directly below 12 o'clock.

This is not universal, however, as not every company prints their logo in the same location (I went to several "big chain" websites and found watches for with the logo on the bottom or side of the watch face, or not printed at all). Thus, on these watches it is likely done more out of tradition than anything else.
I can't remember if it was mentioned in "Imponderables" or somewhere else, but setting the hands to 10:10 also makes the watch "smile".
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  #38  
Old 15 January 2007, 08:45 PM
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Bryan With a 'Y' Bryan With a 'Y' is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sandycheeks View Post
241. The average person falls asleep in seven minutes.
What, seven minutes from now?
That's no fair! I'm not even sleeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee e
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  #39  
Old 16 January 2007, 09:58 AM
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Dactyl Dactyl is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaGuyWitBluGlasses View Post
Actually, with the I sound, orange can be pronounced double stressed, so it can still have a perfect rhyme with fringe, binge etc.. (but not with lunge, plunge etc.)

But double rhymes are often considered childish. And of course, the differences of pronounciations make the perfect rhyme debate fairly odd for english.

I pronounce Orange with an I sound and double stressing it just sounds weird. Is there any disyllablic word with a double stress? Try saying it. Now trying saying it in a sentence. It just sounds like someone had trod on your foot halfway through. In fact, I can't think of a single English word that stresses consecutive syllables (however, I'm willing to be corrected).

I will agree with you point that the perfect rhyme debate in English is murky due to regional accents and pronounciations, however, in respect to the FACT as stated in the list it's not completley off base. If we go with the pronounciation key from this dictionary in front of me (which is admittedly British English) we get or-inj where the bold indicates the stress. In that case orange does indeed have no rhyme in the English language.
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  #40  
Old 16 January 2007, 12:10 PM
DaGuyWitBluGlasses DaGuyWitBluGlasses is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dactyl View Post
I pronounce Orange with an I sound and double stressing it just sounds weird. Is there any disyllablic word with a double stress? Try saying it. Now trying saying it in a sentence. It just sounds like someone had trod on your foot halfway through. In fact, I can't think of a single English word that stresses consecutive syllables (however, I'm willing to be corrected).
aloe
bygone
cockpit
dactyl (heyy why does this look familiar )

tutu
undone
wakeboard
xylem
zero
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