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  #1  
Old 17 June 2013, 07:32 PM
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Chef Nigella Lawson appears to be choked by husband during public argument

Captured in a series of shocking photos, British television chef Nigella Lawson appeared to have been choked by her husband Charles Saatchi as an argument turned violent during a restaurant outing on June 9.

http://www.nydailynews.com/entertain...icle-1.1374627
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  #2  
Old 17 June 2013, 07:48 PM
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He says it was a "playful tiff" and that she was only crying because she doesn't like playful tiffs, apparently. And he was repeatedly holding her neck in order to emphasise his point, as one does:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-22935683

Quote:
In Monday's Evening Standard, Mr Saatchi said: "About a week ago, we were sitting outside a restaurant having an intense debate about the children, and I held Nigella's neck repeatedly while attempting to emphasise my point.

"There was no grip, it was a playful tiff.

"Nigella's tears were because we both hate arguing, not because she had been hurt.
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Old 17 June 2013, 07:53 PM
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I realize that I am not everyone & in everyone's relationship but I have an excellent, very trusting relationship with my husband (& I have no history of any type of abuse) and if he put his hand or hands on my neck like her husband did, I would have an instant feeling of panic.
IMO, it sounds like he's trying the 'oh she was just being a silly woman' defense.
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Old 17 June 2013, 07:57 PM
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It's a "playful tiff" but they "both hate arguing."
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  #5  
Old 17 June 2013, 08:44 PM
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My father and my biological mother had plenty of "playful tiffs" that the police would sometimes interrupt, the damn party poopers.

Dear old dad ruined all the fun 40 years ago by playing dead. I still wish I could hold his neck (with both hands) in order to emphasize my "love" for him.
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Old 17 June 2013, 09:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Morgaine View Post
I realize that I am not everyone & in everyone's relationship but I have an excellent, very trusting relationship with my husband (& I have no history of any type of abuse) and if he put his hand or hands on my neck like her husband did, I would have an instant feeling of panic.
And even if she were ok with his hands on her neck 99% of the time, she does not have to be ok with it the other 1% of the time. Whether her reasons for not being ok with it are 'not in public' or 'I just don't want it' or 'not while we're arguing', it doesn't mean that all the past times excuse this one.

Plus, anyone who puts their hands on a person like that to "emphasize a point" should be slapped with a fish, figuratively speaking. Just to emphasize a point.
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Old 18 June 2013, 05:14 AM
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She should have "playfully" kicked him in the balls (you know just to emphasis a point she was trying to make). That might have ended the "tiff" and they'd both be happy.
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Old 18 June 2013, 07:51 AM
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He's been cautioned by the police for assault:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2013/ju...aution-assault

And she appears to have moved out with the children, although Saatchi claims that was only to get away from the paparazzi. Presumably she moved out "playfully", although he hasn't clarified that.

Quote:
He said the pair had reconciled by the time they got home. "We had made up by the time we were home. The paparazzi were congregated outside our house after the story broke yesterday morning, so I told Nigella to take the kids off till the dust settled."

Asked to comment on reports that Lawson had moved out of the family home, her spokesman said: "I can clarify that she has left the family home with her children." Lawson has made no comment since the pictures emerged.
I wish they'd stop illustrating these articles with pictures of them hand-in-hand and smiling, without making it clear when those were taken. I assume they were all taken before the incident in question and aren't supposed to show a "reconciliation".
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Old 18 June 2013, 10:20 AM
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So his got off with a warning for publicly choking his wife, for which there is photographic evidence. Nice.
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  #10  
Old 18 June 2013, 02:39 PM
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If he does that in public I can only imagine what he does (did) at home.
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  #11  
Old 20 June 2013, 07:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard W View Post
He's been cautioned by the police for assault:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2013/ju...aution-assault
What exactly is a caution? "Don't do that again please, bye bye now" kinda thing?

Has she spoken about this incident? I think she would know if it was a playful tiff or not.
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  #12  
Old 20 June 2013, 07:30 PM
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A police caution is a formal alternative to prosecution in minor cases, administered by the police and other law enforcement agencies in England and Wales, and in Hong Kong. It is commonly used to resolve cases where full prosecution is not seen as the most appropriate solution.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Police_caution
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  #13  
Old 20 June 2013, 07:40 PM
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It could be possible (just guessing) that she is refusing to press charges which may make it considerably more difficult to prosecute (I don't know how English courts work with regard to that sort of thing).

Yes, there is evidence that he put his hands on her but if she (hypothetically) won't counter his statement of "it was just a playful tiff" (or worse, backs it up) they may not be able to do much more than give a formal warning.

ETA:

This quote, if nothing else, makes it clear to me his is an abuser though:

Quote:
Lawson has previously described her husband as "an exploder". In 2007 she said: "I'll go quiet when he explodes, and then I am a nest of horrible festeringness."
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  #14  
Old 20 June 2013, 11:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mickey Blue View Post
It could be possible (just guessing) that she is refusing to press charges which may make it considerably more difficult to prosecute (I don't know how English courts work with regard to that sort of thing).
In England and Wales, generally it's the Crown Prosecution Service (part of the government) who decide whether to charge people with crimes and whether to prosecute cases. In this case, the CPS made the decision to charge Charles Saatchi with assault and to offer to deal with the charge by way of a caution, which Charles Saatchi accepted.

If Charles Saatchi had not decided to accept the caution, the CPS would have made the decision whether to prosecute him or not. Part of their decision-making involves considering the views of the victim, but they don't need the victim's permission to bring a prosecution. (Is that how "pressing charges" works in the US?)

Police cautions aren't a way to avoid "difficult" prosecutions, they are a way to quickly deal with minor offences, though I appreciate that for the people involved there are no "minor" offences.

If the CPS brought a prosecution against Charles Saatchi for common assault and he plead guilty (which he has shown he is happy to do), then his sentence would be based on the lowest category of seriousness (assault without injury) which has a maximum penalty of a £150 fine and a lower limit of just being discharged. Pleading guilty and going voluntarily to the police would push this to the lower end of the scale.

So if you are the CPS officer, you can bring a prosecution, which will be expensive and probably result in the defendant getting a criminal record and possibly a fine that's a tiny fraction of the cost of the trial, or you can give him a very cheap police caution that accomplishes pretty much the same thing.

Private citizens can "press charges" (i.e. bring a private prosecution) against someone, but it's very rare due to the expense. A private prosecution last year by the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals cost over £330,000 ($510,000). This isn't what Americans mean by "pressing charges" though, is it?
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Old 21 June 2013, 12:17 AM
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The concept of victims needing to "press charges" is a common misconception in the US system. Prosecutions here work the same as you described there. It is the federal, state, or local prosecutor's decision whether to charge and prosecute someone for a crime. While a cooperative victim certainly tends to make things easier, and an uncooperative victim can make certain charges difficult to impossible to prove, the victim's cooperation or approval are not required. Further, many prosecutions--most often for domestic violence related charges--proceed in the face of victims' active opposition and perjury on the stand. It's dealt with by the prosecutor by using tactics like impeaching the victim's recantation and by introducing evidence about the psychological effects of domestic violence.

I handled many cases where the victim wasn't just reluctant, but was actively fighting the prosecution and either testifying on behalf of the defendant or claiming that she (all the cases I handled involved male defendants and female victims) could not remember anything, or that she had been the instigator and he was just defending himself. In each of those cases, there was evidence of the victims' statements to others shortly after the crime where she told a different story. The jury gets to decide whether to believe those statements or the statements she made in court. Often the in-court statements are pretty transparently false.
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Old 21 June 2013, 02:19 AM
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Interesting, learn something new every day.
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  #17  
Old 21 June 2013, 03:40 AM
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Wow, so the maximum fine for assault without injury is 150 pounds, but it's 1000 pound fine for watching TV without a licence?
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  #18  
Old 23 June 2013, 12:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GaryM View Post
If the CPS brought a prosecution against Charles Saatchi for common assault and he plead guilty (which he has shown he is happy to do), then his sentence would be based on the lowest category of seriousness (assault without injury) which has a maximum penalty of a £150 fine and a lower limit of just being discharged. Pleading guilty and going voluntarily to the police would push this to the lower end of the scale.
Although I agree about the likelihood of this particular case probably being at the lower end of the sentencing scale, I think the low-end category still allows for a sentence scale up to a Band C fine, (which is now expressed as a multiple of income). The maximum Band C fine level is 175% of weekly income, which I would imagine would be more than #150 for Mr Saatchi.

Aggravating factors like racial motivation could also push the sentence higher.

http://sentencingcouncil.judiciary.g...o-download.htm

NB: Happy to be corrected on current sentencing practice and limits, as it's not my area, I'm just surfing the sources!
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Old 28 June 2013, 11:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Morgaine View Post
I realize that I am not everyone & in everyone's relationship but I have an excellent, very trusting relationship with my husband (& I have no history of any type of abuse) and if he put his hand or hands on my neck like her husband did, I would have an instant feeling of panic.
IMO, it sounds like he's trying the 'oh she was just being a silly woman' defense.
This. I'm five feet four inches tall and my husband is eleven inches taller and nearly 100 pounds heavier than I am. He's never touched me in anger. I have no fear of him. However, I am certain that if he placed his hands on my throat in the same manner as shown in the photos, I would feel fear.
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  #20  
Old 07 July 2013, 08:55 AM
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Roll eyes I'm divorcing you, Nigella: Saatchi breaks news to wife

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...hroat-too.html

Multi-millionaire art collector Charles Saatchi has begun divorce proceedings against Nigella Lawson just four weeks after he grabbed her at a celebrity restaurant in London, The Mail on Sunday can reveal.

‘I feel that I have clearly been a disappointment to Nigella during the last year or so, and I am disappointed that she was advised to make no public comment to explain that I abhor violence of any kind against women, and have never abused her physically in any way.’
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