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  #21  
Old 16 May 2013, 09:00 PM
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NorthernLite NorthernLite is offline
 
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Moose

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Originally Posted by A Turtle Named Mack View Post
Is that a reference that makes more sense to Canadians?
Just those who are familiar with Mountie Python

ETA: Monty Python and the Holy Grail Credits

Starting about 1 minute in.

Last edited by NorthernLite; 16 May 2013 at 09:05 PM.
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  #22  
Old 16 May 2013, 10:04 PM
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With regard to moose, collisions are the main cause of accident and death in people moose interactions. Moose are damn big animals, very few people are approaching them (well unless you're talking hunting season).

Last edited by Sue; 16 May 2013 at 10:10 PM.
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  #23  
Old 17 May 2013, 02:09 AM
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queen of the caramels queen of the caramels is offline
 
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I've been here 13 yrs and never seen a moose though there was a bear living near the children's school.
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  #24  
Old 17 May 2013, 02:14 AM
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Come to think of it I've lived here all my life and the only time I ever saw a moose was at the Toronto Zoo! I've eaten moose though. I don't recommend it.
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  #25  
Old 17 May 2013, 02:50 AM
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queen of the caramels queen of the caramels is offline
 
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I've had moose and bison and both of them went under the "meh..meat" catagory.

There's a bison farm near here that I sometimes go to with the children during the late summer Portes ouvertes sur les fermes du Quebec . But I try to vary where we go every year.
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  #26  
Old 17 May 2013, 06:27 AM
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Don Enrico Don Enrico is offline
 
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Moose

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Originally Posted by A Turtle Named Mack View Post
ETA2: Is this true Troberg? (from the same article):
Quote:
The Swedes fence their highways to reduce moose fatalities and design moose-proof cars.
I'm not Troberg, and I'm not sure about the fencing part (I've been to Sweden, but don't remember any fences along the highways), but I can tell you about "moose-proof cars". A Swedish automobil magazin is testing cars to how well they evade a suddenly appearing obstacle. Because it is done in Sweden, and a "suddenly appearing obstacle" could be a wild animal coming out of the woods, the test became colloquially known as "moose test". It became famous after the Mercedes-Benz A-Class failed it epically in 1997. Moose test on Wikipedia.

So, the Swedish don't design special moose-proof cars. A Swedish magazin does testing to conclude whether cars can avoid obstacles - like moose.
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  #27  
Old 17 May 2013, 08:07 AM
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Regarding the polite graffiti entry on the list, someone of my acquaintance reported on seeing this written on restroom wall in Canada: "Your mom is a nice lady."
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  #28  
Old 17 May 2013, 08:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A Turtle Named Mack View Post
ETA2: Is this true Troberg? (from the same article):
Quote:
Those who care most passionately about moose are – paradoxically – hunters, in particular people who live in wilderness and rural communities and those who depend on moose for food. In Sweden, no fall menu is without a mouthwatering moose dish. The Swedes fence their highways to reduce moose fatalities and design moose-proof cars. Sweden is less than half as large as the Canadian province of British Columbia, but the annual take of moose in Sweden – upward of 150,000 – is twice that of the total moose harvest in North America. That is how much Swedes cherish their moose.
True and false.

A fall menu without moose is perfectly fine, but, if you have relatives who hunt, expect to eat a lot of moose.

Yes, most major roads in areas with moose are fenced, but not to protect the moose. The fences are there to protect drivers, not only from moose, but also deer, boar and other large animals. A mouse is taller and heavier than a horse, and if you hit one, chances are that it will, at the very least, ruin the entire day for you. About 50% of all traffic accidents in Sweden are accident with wild animals. Since they usually happen on high speed roads, they are also responsible for a large part of the fatalites. Iirc (and I might be a bit off here, but as ballpark figures, they should be about right), we have four large classes of traffic fatalities in Sweden, of about the same size: animals, alcohol/drugs, suicides and the rest.

So, being the best country in the world with regards to traffic safety (comparing fatalities per traveled distance), we try to fix what we can. Moose fences are a very effective measure, and, compared to the cost of a fatality or permanent disability, very cost effective. It's also much easier than to reduce alcohol/drug related accidents or suicides (though these are also addressed, but with less effect).

As for designing cars to withstand moose collisions, well, yes and no. We do actually design and crash test vehicles to make them more likely to withstand a moose hit (it's mostly a matter of the two front roof posts being solid enough), but it's not a very high design priority.
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  #29  
Old 17 May 2013, 08:07 PM
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Hero_Mike Hero_Mike is offline
 
 
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Let's just talk about Canada for a moment, from the viewpoint of a typical Canadian. I am a first-generation Canadian, the child of two immigrant parents. There are many more like me - we are a country with a huge foreign-born population (somewhere around 8 million) as a percentage of our total population. Huge numbers of us also live in large cities.

What I'm saying about us Canadians, with respect to Swedes, is that we have much less of a tradition of hunting and eating moose, because we - Canadians - are less ethnically homogeneous than the Swedes. (I won't look up the statistics, but I doubt very much that Sweden takes in the percentage of immigrants we do in Canada.) Some people come from countries with no moose to hunt, were never hunters themselves, or even have cultural or religious dietary restrictions. Many live far away from where the moose can be hunted, and I can say from personal knowledge that it's a considerable investment of time and money to take up hunting moose as a sport - far more planning and expense than just buying a gun and a few bullets. And once the moose is shot, the fun is over and the considerable work of butchering it begins.

In any case, "ethnic Swedes" may have a tradition of eating moose, but only a handful of Canadians have that similar kind of Canadian "ethnicity". Many of us are urban, immigrant, hyphenated Canadians. And while moose can be tasty, hunting one is not the way I want to spend one of my precious weeks of vacation. (We Canadians tend to get less time off too.)
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  #30  
Old 21 May 2013, 01:25 PM
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The only moose I hunt is chocolate mousse!


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  #31  
Old 21 May 2013, 02:04 PM
overyonder overyonder is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hero_Mike View Post
In any case, "ethnic Swedes" may have a tradition of eating moose, but only a handful of Canadians have that similar kind of Canadian "ethnicity". Many of us are urban, immigrant, hyphenated Canadians. And while moose can be tasty, hunting one is not the way I want to spend one of my precious weeks of vacation. (We Canadians tend to get less time off too.)
I think this is generally true, but even more so in the last 20-25 years. I vividly remember as a kid, neighbors and acquaintances in my home town of 6,000 (albeit only 20 miles from Montreal) people would take hunting trips to hunt big game (moose, sometimes bear).

The pride of killing a big-point moose would almost certainly guarantee that moose rack would be proudly displayed on the roof of a car or pick up truck. That tradition has mostly become just a memory, for better or for worse.

Even google images wasn't able to find me one (I only searched 10 seconds I admit).

OY
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  #32  
Old 21 May 2013, 03:30 PM
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I grew up in Montreal and we got moose in jars sent to us every hunting season by my uncle. It was not something I looked forward to. In Montreal I didn't know anyone who hunted but now living in Ottawa it's not unusual at all to have neighbours who dress up like Elmer Fudd every fall and go off into the woods to shoot at animals (I don't think they are hunting moose around here but may be wrong).
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  #33  
Old 21 May 2013, 03:48 PM
overyonder overyonder is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by overyonder View Post
Even google images wasn't able to find me one (I only searched 10 seconds I admit).

OY
Found one.

[I hope it works because it won't open at work]

OY
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  #34  
Old 21 May 2013, 03:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sue View Post
I grew up in Montreal and we got moose in jars sent to us every hunting season by my uncle. It was not something I looked forward to. In Montreal I didn't know anyone who hunted but now living in Ottawa it's not unusual at all to have neighbours who dress up like Elmer Fudd every fall and go off into the woods to shoot at animals (I don't think they are hunting moose around here but may be wrong).
Moose hunting licenses is controled by a selective process, so chances are, unless they've been lucky to be drawn, they don't have a permit for moose and are hunting deer, or vicious Barrhaven turkeys.

http://www.huntinginontario.ca/en/species/moose

Quote:
To receive a validation tag to hunt for an adult moose
(or to hunt for a calf moose in WMUs 48, 55A, 55B or 57),
the resident hunter must purchase a moose licence and
apply to the moose validation tag draw.
http://www.mnr.gov.on.ca/stdprodcons...ent/239848.pdf
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  #35  
Old 21 May 2013, 03:57 PM
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A Turtle Named Mack A Turtle Named Mack is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sue View Post
...but now living in Ottawa it's not unusual at all to have neighbours who dress up like Elmer Fudd every fall and go off into the woods to shoot at animals.
Surely not! Fudd dressed in medium brown, which would make a hunter seen through partial foliage appear to be a deer, moose, or even a bear. North American hunters today almost entirely dress in woodland camouflage with the broken irregular colors allowing blending in with the foliage, usually supplemented with a safety-orange vest and cap (since the prey can't see the color), to warn that rare hunter that does not properly ascertain whether a target is appropriate before pulling the trigger.
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  #36  
Old 21 May 2013, 04:03 PM
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A Turtle Named Mack A Turtle Named Mack is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Troberg View Post
A mouse is taller and heavier than a horse, and if you hit one, chances are that it will, at the very least, ruin the entire day for you.
Wow, you have some massive mice!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Troberg View Post
Moose fences are a very effective measure, and, compared to the cost of a fatality or permanent disability, very cost effective.
Are large animal crossings/underpasses constructed every so often, or are the crossings where streams are bridged sufficient?
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  #37  
Old 21 May 2013, 05:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A Turtle Named Mack View Post
Surely not! Fudd dressed in medium brown, which would make a hunter seen through partial foliage appear to be a deer, moose, or even a bear. North American hunters today almost entirely dress in woodland camouflage with the broken irregular colors allowing blending in with the foliage, usually supplemented with a safety-orange vest and cap (since the prey can't see the color), to warn that rare hunter that does not properly ascertain whether a target is appropriate before pulling the trigger.
Hunters here sometimes wear the plaid vest commonly seen on ye old lumberjacks. I've often found that those who do so seem to think it makes them look rugged and outdoorsy.
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  #38  
Old 21 May 2013, 06:35 PM
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I was thinking more of the classic Elmer Fudd hunting hat. Nothing says rugged and outdoorsy more than that!
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  #39  
Old 21 May 2013, 06:41 PM
overyonder overyonder is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alarm View Post
Hunters here sometimes wear the plaid vest commonly seen on ye old lumberjacks. I've often found that those who do so seem to think it makes them look rugged and outdoorsy.
Well if you do hunt... that does qualify as outdoorsy

OY
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  #40  
Old 21 May 2013, 06:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by overyonder View Post
Well if you do hunt... that does qualify as outdoorsy

OY
Nothing is quite as outdoorsy as a bunch of men, who go hunting only once a year, and never come back with anything but a couple of two-fours of empties.

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