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  #21  
Old 01 September 2017, 08:21 PM
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GenYus234 GenYus234 is offline
 
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It might be the case, but since the patient was an officer in Idaho and the officer demanding to take the blood was in Utah, I'm not sure he would be aware of what Idaho and/or Rigby's policies were. And if he had been aware, he should have notified the nurse of that fact. I've not seen a complete video of the situation, but none of the ones I've seen have any mention of that.
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  #22  
Old 01 September 2017, 09:13 PM
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I'd put it at 2:1 odds that "Detective Payne, Forensic Phlebotomist" is secretly a vampire wearing lots of sunscreen. That's not a very convincing alias, Vlad.
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  #23  
Old 01 September 2017, 09:44 PM
St. Alia St. Alia is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beachlife! View Post
Those terms don't mean the same thing. When you start calling anything roughing up, it makes the term have no meaning.
Yes, they do.

Maybe not to you. Maybe not where you live. But roughing up means manhandling. Treating roughly. Putting hands on and shoving around, being rough.

Quote:
rough up
v.
1. To cause something to become less smooth: Rough the wood up so that the glue will hold better. The ice skates roughed up the surface of the ice.
2. To treat someone roughly or with physical violence; manhandle someone: The bully roughed up one of the kids on the playground. They threatened to rough me up if I didn't give them the money.
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  #24  
Old 01 September 2017, 09:45 PM
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E. Q. Taft E. Q. Taft is offline
 
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Regardless of what the nurse decides to do, if I were running that hospital, I would be having my legal team look at all possible remedies. You should back up your staff when they are doing their job correctly.
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  #25  
Old 01 September 2017, 11:12 PM
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Little Pink Pill Little Pink Pill is offline
 
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I agree E.Q, especially because, according to the nurse in the video, the local police force agreed to the protocol she was showing him on paper.

Whether you call it manhandling or roughing up, IMO the nurse herself accurately described it as assault. I've watched several versions of the video, and he gave no orders she disobeyed when he went to arrest her. He didn't say, "Turn around and put your hands behind your back" or "come with me." He just struck out at the phone and started grabbing at her. He said "we're done, you're under arrest" after he started the physical altercation, and the only directions I can hear him give are after he drags her outside.
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  #26  
Old 02 September 2017, 11:44 AM
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Default Officer who arrested Utah nurse placed on administrative leave

The Salt Lake City police officer who arrested and allegedly assaulted a nurse for refusing a blood draw from an unconscious patient has been placed on administrative leave, the mayor's office said Friday.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/officer...trative-leave/
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  #27  
Old 02 September 2017, 06:31 PM
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Plurabelle Plurabelle is offline
 
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When my husband was hit by a drunk driver, the hospital called me to ask permission that they draw blood from him. (He had a concussion and was knocked out, but not seriously hurt). He'd been in the hospital before for kidney stones and I was his emergency contact.

The hospital staff said it was important for our insurance to establish that he was sober, so I okayed it (I was on my way to the hospital anyway).

There was absolutely no question who was at fault in our case.

I have never heard of cops drawing blood themselves, that freaks me out.
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  #28  
Old 02 September 2017, 07:00 PM
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He's a a trained police phlebotomist.
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  #29  
Old 02 September 2017, 07:05 PM
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I wouldn't assume Plurabelle missed that detail. As I said above, I am not entirely comfortable with the idea of cops being trained/operating as phlebotomists.
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  #30  
Old 02 September 2017, 09:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lainie View Post
I wouldn't assume Plurabelle missed that detail. As I said above, I am not entirely comfortable with the idea of cops being trained/operating as phlebotomists.
Exactly, why on earth are police being trained as phlebotomists? As the nurse said, blood is about one of the most personal things that can be taken from you. Get a warrant or get out.
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  #31  
Old 02 September 2017, 10:04 PM
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erwins erwins is offline
 
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Even with a warrant, a health professional is not required to do the blood draw for the police. A warrant is a court order commanding law enforcement to do something (conduct a search, collect evidence, make an arrest). Third parties can't refuse to allow it, but they typically don't have to help.

This is why that iPhone password cracking order was so extraordinary. Police could easily get a warrant to search the phone, but the warrant doesn't mean anyone has to help them get the evidence.

I believe some healthcare folks have been declining to help because it is not a procedure being done for medical reasons, or, typically, for the patient's benefit. So, police have to be trained to do it.
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  #32  
Old 03 September 2017, 09:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erwins View Post
I believe some healthcare folks have been declining to help because it is not a procedure being done for medical reasons, or, typically, for the patient's benefit.
And that can also lead to illegal arrests. That's actually what I assumed had happened when I first heard this story.
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  #33  
Old 04 September 2017, 02:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sylvanz View Post
That guy needs to be fired
How many cops have been sacked for shooting people? I don't think this guy will be fired.
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  #34  
Old 04 September 2017, 02:34 AM
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Sylvanz Sylvanz is online now
 
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Sad, but true.
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  #35  
Old 04 September 2017, 02:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by damian View Post
How many cops have been sacked for shooting people? I don't think this guy will be fired.
Its sad, but I agree. It seems insane to believe it, but people put an insane amount of trust in the notion that "cops are always right" that its a bias that is pervasive in our legal system. That and I don't think people really are interested in accountability. If its not the leaders that aren't interested, its the legal system that basically lets too many guilty people off since people don't seem to use their heads.
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  #36  
Old 04 September 2017, 02:56 AM
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ganzfeld ganzfeld is offline
 
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Police

He is claiming he was told to arrest her by his office. (Maybe whoever did that is the other officer who's been put on leave.) That's a bit different from an officer making a decision on his own to shoot at someone.

I do think someone will probably at least get fired in this case. A criminal investigation has been launched. I would hope any officers who stood by and questioned nothing will be appropriately reprimanded after investigation as well.
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  #37  
Old 04 September 2017, 03:14 AM
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Little Pink Pill Little Pink Pill is offline
 
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Never mind, I misread.
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  #38  
Old 05 September 2017, 01:54 PM
Sooeygun Sooeygun is offline
 
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Statement from Rigby police where the patient was a reserve officer.
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  #39  
Old 05 September 2017, 02:32 PM
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Calling Nurse A 'Hero,' Utah Hospital Bars Police From Patient-Care Areas

Quote:
"Law enforcement who come to the hospital for any reason involving patients will be required to check in to the front desk of the hospital," said chief nursing officer Margaret Pearce of the University of Utah Hospital. "There, a hospital house supervisor will meet the officers to work through each request."

[snip]

"We are a Level 1 Trauma Center with the only dedicated burn unit in the Mountain West region and we have some of the sickest patients anywhere. Because of this, we work with law enforcement on a regular basis for a variety of reasons and will continue to do so. However, I consider the way in which Alex was treated to be totally unacceptable. No individual in a role of patient care should ever be treated in this fashion."
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  #40  
Old 05 September 2017, 04:33 PM
Dr. Dave Dr. Dave is offline
 
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To put a finer point on the link posted by Sooeygun, the police in the Idaho town (where the patient was also a reserve officer) say they did not ask the police in Utah to get the blood- did not even know about it until last week.

Last edited by Dr. Dave; 05 September 2017 at 04:39 PM.
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