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  #881  
Old 05 October 2017, 09:35 PM
jimmy101_again jimmy101_again is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Richard W View Post
According to my dad (who is generally quite up on these things) this is one of the drawbacks of modern Google. I say "according to my dad", but I've noticed too, I just hadn't noticed it and then checked it and thought about it systematically.

It used to be that the rules for search engines were pretty straightforward - you could use quotes if you wanted the literal string; you could use wild cards and "plus" and "minus" signs if you wanted to get a bit more advanced. The search terms were indexed relatively straightforwardly, and apart from deciding on the ranking (which is not easy in itself, but which you could refine by using more precise terms), that was it. Once you'd learned how to use it, you could search quite well and find what you were looking for.

These days, though, they're always trying to be clever and second-guess what you really meant, which, combined with paid results at the top, has combined to actually make it harder to find something specific. The tricks that you used to be able to use to narrow down the results no longer work, because the interface is trying to be "more natural" or "less programmatic" or whatever, and adds loads of stuff that it thinks you might really be interested in, or that somebody has paid them to show. That can be annoying.

(My dad found this while trying to search for very specific tools, such as drill bits or screws of a certain size and composition, over the years. Apparently it's now harder to find those in the results than it used to be ten years or so ago, despite the supposedly more advanced search and wider choice that there is now.)
The search algorithm is really pretty sophisticated. One particularly tricky part is term and phrase replacement. For example, a search with "second amendment" should also find "2nd amendment". But not a page with "second" in the 1st paragraph and "amendment" in the 12th paragraph. A search with "congress" should also return "congressional", "congressman", etc but with lower weightings. When you get enough phrase replacement rules, and all the other things that go into a page's ranking (like how often it is linked by other pages, which is Google's main claim to fame), you can start to get unexpected results.
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  #882  
Old 06 October 2017, 05:29 AM
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I tend to assume the parent is helping the adult child unless the parent is very old (say, 80+) or disabled. Though I'd be more inclined to round up the parent's estimated age if the adult child owned the home.
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  #883  
Old 06 October 2017, 01:01 PM
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But why would you assume either that one of them must be in need of the other's help, or that they might not be equally helping each other?

Again, I know that there's a cultural assumption that multiple generations (aside from minor children) only live together when one party is in such need that they can't live separately. But that assumption is not shared in all cultures, nor do even those in the culture that has it necessarily abide by it.

Plus which, there are plenty of cases in which both parties are in need of assistance, but their needs mesh.
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  #884  
Old 06 October 2017, 05:20 PM
Bill Bill is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Sooeygun View Post
To me "I live with my mother" means mother owns the house (or is the main holder of the lease). "My mother lives with me" means it's my house or apt or whatever. I would look to the age, especially of Mother, to guess the reason.
That's how I'd interpret it, too.

I used to say "I live with my mother"; my mother (and father) selected the house years ago and paid for it, and I just stayed there.

My co-worker used to say "My mother lives with me"; my co-worker moved out of her mother's place into her own place, and later her mother moved in with her.

Quote:
Originally Posted by thorny locust View Post
If I knew nothing about any of their financial or medical situations, I wouldn't assume it was one or the other, or even that it was necessarily either of those things.

Sometimes both parties are short on money. Sometimes both parties are being helped by the arrangement -- a trade of babysitting for having someone in the house who can drive, say. Sometimes the people are just comfortable living together, and don't subscribe to the assumption, common though it is in this society (though not in many others), that different generations only share housing under some sort of duress.
Absolutely; I wouldn't judge anybody (e.g., an adult man who still lives with his mother is a "mama's boy"). I don't know the circumstances and wouldn't judge anybody even if I did.

Thanks.

Bill
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  #885  
Old 06 October 2017, 05:24 PM
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Lainie Lainie is offline
 
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I wouldn't assume helping, or at least one-sided helping. But the phrasing does connote a difference to me. It would do so if you substituted "friend" or "cousin" for "mother/father/parents," too.
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  #886  
Old 06 October 2017, 08:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thorny locust View Post
But why would you assume either that one of them must be in need of the other's help, or that they might not be equally helping each other?
I think I'd assume helping in the sense of financial help if a working adult lived at home but the parents were young enough to still be working and perfectly capable of living alone. But then that's because this scenario gets and has gotten played out a lot among my extended family and circle of friends. What I don't get is the judgieness that gets associated with this. To me it makes perfect sense to do this if all involved are happy with it.
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  #887  
Old 11 October 2017, 09:36 PM
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My question: I've been watching a few baseball Youtube videos. One today showed a bunch of bad or mistaken calls by the umpires.

Do Major League umpires have some sort of performance review whereby they have to meet standards continually to work in the league?

Some umps seem to be in those videos more than others.
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  #888  
Old 11 October 2017, 11:55 PM
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Darth Credence Darth Credence is offline
 
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Is the term "Nork" a racial slur? It sure feels like it to me. It seems the same thing as shortening Japanese to the first syllable, or Pakistani to the first two. I've seen a bunch of people starting to use it, and I've brought up that it sounds just like that, but they always defend it by saying it is just shortening their name. When asked, everyone seemed very confused by the idea that they would call South Koreans "Souks", which makes me think that they know it's a slur, it just happens to be one they can get away with. (ETA - they pretty much all responded with they call South Koreans "Koreans".)
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  #889  
Old 12 October 2017, 12:07 AM
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Quote:
Do Major League umpires have some sort of performance review whereby they have to meet standards continually to work in the league?
Yep, there are standards that have to be met, and umps who make a lot of bad calls are supposed to hear about it. And like players and managers, umpires can be suspended for their behavior. That said, you're right, there are some umpires who seem to make a lot of more noticeably questionable plays. I'm sure some get let go or sent down to the minor leagues, but you never hear about it.

This article from 2012 has some info on this.
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  #890  
Old 12 October 2017, 12:46 AM
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Originally Posted by Roadsterboy View Post
Thanks very much for the article. It was an education.
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  #891  
Old 12 October 2017, 01:20 PM
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What's a "neckbeard" in the sense used to disparage people like MRAs and Gamergate types? The only facial hair style that I can think of that would fit the description is that worn by Michael Eavis (clean-shaven around the cheeks and mouth but with a full beard starting at chin level). That's quite an uncommon style and not one, so far as I know, that's associated with the alt-right.
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  #892  
Old 12 October 2017, 01:22 PM
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Know Your Meme has some examples. Some are what you describe, others are more just whiskery necks.
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  #893  
Old 12 October 2017, 02:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darth Credence View Post
they always defend it by saying it is just shortening their name.
I think you're right to point out that using Jap or Paki is also "just shortening the name", yet it's still insulting and rude. Insulting someone for convenience is still insulting.

Seaboe
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  #894  
Old 13 October 2017, 12:33 AM
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ganzfeld ganzfeld is offline
 
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I think for these insults the racism hides in plain sight. People who use them and don't think they're being racist simply say "Well Pakistani isn't a race". But we know why they say it because of when they say it. Same goes for anti-muslims and anti-immigrant. Not hiding anything. And I agree that Nork is in that class.
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  #895  
Old 13 October 2017, 01:08 AM
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Regarding Kennedy and Vietnam, Iíve heard so many say that Kennedy would have changed his mind and gotten us out of that quagmire. Is there any possible truth to this belief or is it more a product of the romanticism people have of the Kennedy administration?
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  #896  
Old 13 October 2017, 01:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lainie View Post
Know Your Meme has some examples. Some are what you describe, others are more just whiskery necks.
So then, do the alt-right actually tend to have that style of beard? The pictures there that show stereotypical misogynistic trolls tend just to have wispy stubble and bum-fluff, presumably because they're not yet mature enough to have a full beard. The ones that show Michael Eavis-style beards (which would have to be grown deliberately - I'm sure he could grow a full beard if he wanted to) are on pictures that are unrelated to the "neckbeard" stereotype, such as that one of Jesus, or the 19th-century bloke.

In other words, if I was right about the type of beard it means, why is that associated with the alt-right? Those pictures don't explain it. The ones that are associated with the alt-right don't have that style of beard (just generally bad facial hair), and the ones that do have that style of beard have no obvious alt-right connection, to me at least...
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  #897  
Old 13 October 2017, 01:43 AM
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I first heard the term associated with a subset of the hipster stereotype, mainly those into alt-folk type music. (Think Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros, a few of whom have/had scruffy beards somewhat like a more unkempt version of the Michael Eavis style). If I had to guess, it's that trilby-wearing hipsters got conflated with fedora-wearing men's rights activists, and it just steamrolled from there.

ETA: Even when it was used to describe the hipsters, it carried a dismissive connotation of both someone who was obnoxiously pretentious and perhaps a bit socially clueless.
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  #898  
Old 13 October 2017, 01:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouse View Post
Regarding Kennedy and Vietnam, Iíve heard so many say that Kennedy would have changed his mind and gotten us out of that quagmire. Is there any possible truth to this belief or is it more a product of the romanticism people have of the Kennedy administration?
I am no Kennedy expert. I do know a lot about his assassination, and in that study, I've gotten to know the man.

Kennedy effectively led the battle on communism, including the fight in Vietnam. He sent a lot of expertise to Vietnam in what is now known as a AAA mission (Advise, Assist, Accompany). He pushed the envelope and was an ardent supporter of the Southeast Asia Treaty Organisation (SEATO), which was similar to NATO.

Kennedy initiated the US involvement in Vietnam, and he was stubborn. So, I don't think he would have changed his mind. He had not demonstrated that as a personal or political trait in his life. In fact, he laid down a lot of ultimatums and took a lot of aggressive steps to counter communism (Missile Crisis, Ich bin ein Berliner, Bay of Pigs, Laotian neutrality). Not once did he back down.

However, that is not to say that he would not have had a Gulf of Tonkin or a bigger escalation. He started with 900 US military in South Vietnam in 1961 and ended with 16000 at his death. So, he was open to some escalation. But I am not sure he would have escalated to the point that Johnson/Nixon did.
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  #899  
Old 13 October 2017, 11:03 AM
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I agree with UEL. One of the most tragic and frustrating things about the war is that Johnson seemed to realize on some level that continuing it was wrong, but apparently couldn't see a way out of it. Kennedy was so different in personality* and approach to politics/governance; maybe he could have avoided that.

Also, I think initially gaining the office through assassination really colored Johnson's administration, even after he was elected. I think it made him question himself, shook his confidence. The election was less than a year after Kennedy's death, he may have felt that he didn't win on his own merits.

*They had some traits in common, I suppose. Horniness, entitlement. ;-)

Last edited by Lainie; 13 October 2017 at 11:22 AM.
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  #900  
Old 13 October 2017, 11:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by musicgeek View Post
I first heard the term associated with a subset of the hipster stereotype, mainly those into alt-folk type music. (Think Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros, a few of whom have/had scruffy beards somewhat like a more unkempt version of the Michael Eavis style). If I had to guess, it's that trilby-wearing hipsters got conflated with fedora-wearing men's rights activists, and it just steamrolled from there.

ETA: Even when it was used to describe the hipsters, it carried a dismissive connotation of both someone who was obnoxiously pretentious and perhaps a bit socially clueless.
I first heard it regarding nerdy shut-ins who lived in their parents' basements and played RPGs all the time. I only make a tenuous connection to the alt-right, following the thread of the stereotype I described above -> nerds on the internet all the time, particularly Reddit for some reason -> nerds who are MRA's -> nerds who have aligned themselves with a political party that they find empowering.

Perhaps part of why I've seen that evolution is that the people in the first subset I described did and do exist but have grown up and their views and societal needs have changed accordingly. Just speculating.
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