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  #221  
Old 01 January 2019, 03:12 PM
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4. What English idiom is likely derived from a stinky, salted item that can be drawn across the trail of hounds following a scent, to mislead them?

Red herring.

6. Romanesco, in the cabbage family, looks like a combination between what two more common vegetables, of which it's sometimes considered a variety?

Broccoli and cauliflower. Though its characteristic shape isn't ordinarily found in either of them.
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  #222  
Old 01 January 2019, 03:42 PM
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I think people have gotten most of the ones I know. No one has my answer to #3 yet though. 3. is "halt and catch fire."
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  #223  
Old 02 January 2019, 06:35 AM
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4. What English idiom is likely derived from a stinky, salted item that can be drawn across the trail of hounds following a scent, to mislead them?

That must be a red herring.
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  #224  
Old 08 January 2019, 01:06 PM
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LAST WEEK'S ANSWERS

1. Who was created "Viscount of Alamein" in September 1946?
El Alamein is in Egypt, but the hero of the two 1942 battles there, General Bernard Montgomery, got a homegrown British peerage title named for his victory four years later.

2. Of the dozens of sequels in wide release to U.S. theaters in 2018, only one numbered its title with Roman numerals. Which movie?
Only Creed II, because of its place in the Rocky franchise, is keeping the 1970s/1980s sequels-with-Roman-numerals convention alive.

3. What do the initials stand for in HCF, a mythical assembly language command that would make a computer crash irretrievably and require a restart?
This seems like a science question but it might actually be a TV question for lot of you. The computer programming in-joke in question inspired the title of AMC's Halt and Catch Fire.

4. What English idiom is likely derived from a stinky, salted item that can be drawn across the trail of hounds following a scent, to mislead them?
You could confuse the dogs tracking you with a red herring.

5. What country borders both the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea?
Russia is the only country to touch both. As you may have heard, it's very big.

6. Romanesco, in the cabbage family, looks like a combination between what two more common vegetables, of which it's sometimes considered a variety?
Because it resembles them both, Romanesco is sometimes called Romanesco broccoli or Romanesco cauliflower.

7. What unusual distinction is shared by all these movies? Bad Moms, Batman, The Best Man, Cat People, The Conjuring, Daddy's Home, Ghostbusters, Going My Way, Iron Man 2, Look Who's Talking, Next Friday, You Only Live Twice.
These are definitely not Christmas movies, but each has a direct sequel that is set at Christmastime. Probably easier than usual, given the holiday theme...but I could have made it even easier by including European Vacation and Ernest Goes to Camp.


THIS WEEK'S QUESTIONS

1. In 2006, what sports organization unveiled a disastrous new synthetic recipe for its game balls that only last three months?

2. What former Roman province on the Bay of Biscay became part of France in 1137 when its duchess, Eleanor, married Louis VII?

3. Vancouver-born identical twins Drew and Jonathan Scott have been better known by what TV name since 2011?

4. Different isotopes of an element have differing numbers of what elementary particle?

5. What 1960s fashion innovation was championed by a British designer who named it after her favorite car?

6. Ronald Wilson Reagan and William Jefferson Clinton had middle names that were the last names of other presidents. What U.S. president's sole middle name was also the *first* name of another president?

7. What unusual distinction is shared by all these singles? "All About Soul," "All I Want Is You," "Black & White," "The Boss," "Crazy Cool," "Da Funk," "Hocus Pocus," "It's a Beautiful Day," "Le Freak," "Pound Cake," "Sight of the Sun," "You Can Depend on Me."

Enjoy
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  #225  
Old 08 January 2019, 01:18 PM
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2. What former Roman province on the Bay of Biscay became part of France in 1137 when its duchess, Eleanor, married Louis VII?

Aquitaine

4. Different isotopes of an element have differing numbers of what elementary particle?

Neutrons

5. What 1960s fashion innovation was championed by a British designer who named it after her favorite car?

Miniskirts
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  #226  
Old 08 January 2019, 01:19 PM
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3. Vancouver-born identical twins Drew and Jonathan Scott have been better known by what TV name since 2011? Property Brothers

4. Different isotopes of an element have differing numbers of what elementary particle? Neutrons
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  #227  
Old 08 January 2019, 01:26 PM
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1. Don't know.

2. Aquitane.

3. Don't know.

4. Neutrons.

5. Miniskirt.

6. Drumpf / Kennedy.

7. Nothing comes to mind.
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  #228  
Old 08 January 2019, 02:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DadOf3 View Post
THIS WEEK'S QUESTIONS

1. In 2006, what sports organization unveiled a disastrous new synthetic recipe for its game balls that only last three months?
I'm not exactly an authority on sports, so I'm going to say bowling.
Quote:


2. What former Roman province on the Bay of Biscay became part of France in 1137 when its duchess, Eleanor, married Louis VII?
Acquitaine (which this program thinks I can't spell)
Quote:


3. Vancouver-born identical twins Drew and Jonathan Scott have been better known by what TV name since 2011?
Some character on an eight year old show who was introduced as an infant.
Quote:


4. Different isotopes of an element have differing numbers of what elementary particle?
electrons, which is probably wrong, since I mentally tossed a coin to pick a particle.
Quote:


5. What 1960s fashion innovation was championed by a British designer who named it after her favorite car?
This must be the mini skirt.
Quote:


6. Ronald Wilson Reagan and William Jefferson Clinton had middle names that were the last names of other presidents. What U.S. president's sole middle name was also the *first* name of another president?
I haven't enough interest in the Presidents's names to know.
Quote:


7. What unusual distinction is shared by all these singles? "All About Soul," "All I Want Is You," "Black & White," "The Boss," "Crazy Cool," "Da Funk," "Hocus Pocus," "It's a Beautiful Day," "Le Freak," "Pound Cake," "Sight of the Sun," "You Can Depend on Me."
They're all duets between black and white artists. Okay, probably not, but that's what came to mind first.

Not exactly a championship return.

Seaboe
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  #229  
Old 08 January 2019, 05:45 PM
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I actually know a Question 7 (I think):

Quote:
Originally Posted by DadOf3 View Post
7. What unusual distinction is shared by all these singles? "All About Soul," "All I Want Is You," "Black & White," "The Boss," "Crazy Cool," "Da Funk," "Hocus Pocus," "It's a Beautiful Day," "Le Freak," "Pound Cake," "Sight of the Sun," "You Can Depend on Me."
The song names rhyme with the name of the artist:
"Hocus Pocus" by Focus
"Black and White" by Three Dog Night
"Le Freak" by Chic

Quote:
Enjoy
I am! I am!
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  #230  
Old 08 January 2019, 09:19 PM
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[QUOTE=Dr. Winston O'Boogie;1994169]I actually know a Question 7 (I think)

Good one!

"All About Soul" by Billy Joel
"All I Want is You" by U2

Got thrown by a couple titles that apply to more than one song - was thinking of "Black or White" by Michael Jackson, and "Pound Cake" by Van Halen. However, you got the first one, and there's another song by the second title by Drake.
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  #231  
Old 15 January 2019, 04:48 PM
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Hello all,

Sorry for the delay today. For some reason I just got the email a few minutes ago.

LAST WEEK'S ANSWERS

1. In 2006, what sports organization unveiled a disastrous new synthetic recipe for its game balls that only last three months?
The NBA's much-vaunted "New Ball" turned out to be the New Coke of professional sports.

2. What former Roman province on the Bay of Biscay became part of France in 1137 when its duchess, Eleanor, married Louis VII?
Eleanor of Aquitaine
Took the name of her domain
From Gallia Aquitania, a historical region
That dates back to the Roman Legion.

3. Vancouver-born identical twins Drew and Jonathan Scott have been better known by what TV name since 2011?
These are the Property Brothers. How to tell them apart? Just remember this mnemonic: "Jonathan" sounds like "jaw-nothin'" and he's the one who DOESN'T have nothin' on his jaw. (He has stubble.)

4. Different isotopes of an element have differing numbers of what elementary particle?
Isotopes of the same element always have the same number of protons, or they'd have a different atomic number and, therefore, be a different element! It's the number of neutrons that differs between, say, carbon-12 and carbon-14.

5. What 1960s fashion innovation was championed by a British designer who named it after her favorite car?
Mary Quant named the miniskirt for the Mini Cooper, not Frosted Mini Wheats or Lego Mini Figures.

6. Ronald Wilson Reagan and William Jefferson Clinton had middle names that were the last names of other presidents. What U.S. president's sole middle name was also the *first* name of another president?
George Herbert Walker Bush had one of his two middle names work here, thanks to Herbert Hoover, but the only president who fits the "sole middle name" requirement is Hamburglar-in-Chief Donald John Trump.

7. What unusual distinction is shared by all these singles? "All About Soul," "All I Want Is You," "Black & White," "The Boss," "Crazy Cool," "Da Funk," "Hocus Pocus," "It's a Beautiful Day," "Le Freak," "Pound Cake," "Sight of the Sun," "You Can Depend on Me."
All these songs rhyme with the name of the act that performed them. To wit: Bily Joel, U2, Three Dog Night, Diana Ross (or Rick Ross), Paula Abdul, Daft Punk, Focus, Michael Buble, Chic, Drake, fun., and Brenda Lee. I'm sure I missed some possibilities here...what did I forget? (Not counting obvious cases like "Killer Queen" or "Forgot about Dre" or "Make You Sweat.")

THIS WEEK'S QUESTIONS

1. In addition to their day jobs as peasants, what did hoplites do in ancient Greece?

2. Who's the only Shakespearean character to die by drowning?

3. Lignite is the "brown" type of what material?

4. The 1986 law allowing employees to continue their healthcare coverage between employers is usually referred to by the name of what reptile?

5. In classic films, what actress played title characters Letty Lynton, Sadie McKee, Mildred Pierce, Daisy Kenyon, and Harriet Craig?

6. In 2012, a new genus of ferns was named in honor of what singer, because her name is spelled out in base pairs in its DNA?

7. What unusual distinction is shared by all these operas? The Abduction from the Seraglio, Madame Butterfly, The Mikado, Nabucco, The Pearl Fishers, Salome, Semiramide, Turandot.
All are set on the continent of Asia. This one was probably insultingly easy if you know or care about opera, but on the other hand, who knows or cares about opera, am I right?

Enjoy!
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  #232  
Old 15 January 2019, 04:50 PM
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1. In addition to their day jobs as peasants, what did hoplites do in ancient Greece? Soldier

2. Who's the only Shakespearean character to die by drowning? Ophelia?

3. Lignite is the "brown" type of what material? Coal

4. The 1986 law allowing employees to continue their healthcare coverage between employers is usually referred to by the name of what reptile? COBRA, for Consolidated OmniBus, Reconciliation Act

6. In 2012, a new genus of ferns was named in honor of what singer, because her name is spelled out in base pairs in its DNA? Adele??? (don't remember my DNA pair names that well)

ETA: Might want to color hide the answer to #7.
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  #233  
Old 15 January 2019, 04:57 PM
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You spoiled number seven!

2. Who's the only Shakespearean character to die by drowning?

Ofelia
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  #234  
Old 15 January 2019, 05:08 PM
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1. In addition to their day jobs as peasants, what did hoplites do in ancient Greece?

2. Who's the only Shakespearean character to die by drowning? Ophelia

3. Lignite is the "brown" type of what material? Coal

4. The 1986 law allowing employees to continue their healthcare coverage between employers is usually referred to by the name of what reptile? Cobra

6. In 2012, a new genus of ferns was named in honor of what singer, because her name is spelled out in base pairs in its DNA? WAG - Lady Gaga?
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  #235  
Old 15 January 2019, 06:22 PM
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1. I believe they were foot soldiers

2. The fair Ophelia

3. That would be coal

4. What is that reptile in the insurance commercials? Is that a gecko? That's my guess

5. I would guess Mary Pickford, being one of the two women of classic film that I can name (pre WWII)

6. I suppose given the lack of letters in DNA, that Lady GAGA would be right.

7. All are set in Asia.


4 or 5 this week. The bonus being one.
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  #236  
Old 15 January 2019, 06:39 PM
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Glasses

Quote:
Originally Posted by DadOf3 View Post
THIS WEEK'S QUESTIONS

1. In addition to their day jobs as peasants, what did hoplites do in ancient Greece?
Have night jobs as prostitutes?
Quote:


2. Who's the only Shakespearean character to die by drowning?
Is this supposed to be hard? Ophelia.
Quote:


3. Lignite is the "brown" type of what material?
coal
Quote:


4. The 1986 law allowing employees to continue their healthcare coverage between employers is usually referred to by the name of what reptile?
This drives me crazy, because COBRA actually stands for the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act, and there are many of them.
Quote:


5. In classic films, what actress played title characters Letty Lynton, Sadie McKee, Mildred Pierce, Daisy Kenyon, and Harriet Craig?
Joan--ack! I've forgotten her surname! Not Collins, not Fontaine, oh, right, it's Crawford. ETA, I'm very surprised to be the first to get this one (whether I'm right or wrong--but I don't think I'm wrong).
Quote:


6. In 2012, a new genus of ferns was named in honor of what singer, because her name is spelled out in base pairs in its DNA?
Hmmm. DNA only has a few different letters, so I suspect it's a short name. My first thoughts are either Pink or Cher. I'm going to go with Cher because if I don't pick one, I'll dither my lunch hour away.
Quote:


7. What unusual distinction is shared by all these operas? The Abduction from the Seraglio, Madame Butterfly, The Mikado, Nabucco, The Pearl Fishers, Salome, Semiramide, Turandot.
Oopsie. Dad gave us the answer, too.

Seaboe
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  #237  
Old 15 January 2019, 07:17 PM
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My apologies about question 7.
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  #238  
Old 15 January 2019, 08:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DadOf3 View Post
5. What 1960s fashion innovation was championed by a British designer who named it after her favorite car?
Mary Quant named the miniskirt for the Mini Cooper, not Frosted Mini Wheats or Lego Mini Figures.
And here I went all of these years -- including the years in which I sometimes wore one -- thinking that a miniskirt was called a miniskirt just because there isn't very much of it.

I had no idea that it was named after anything.

1. In addition to their day jobs as peasants, what did hoplites do in ancient Greece?

I have the feeling that I ought to know the answer to this one, but whatever's bugging at the back of my head won't come forward.

Serve as the equivalent of cannon fodder, before there were any cannon?



2. Who's the only Shakespearean character to die by drowning?

I can't remember if she's the only one (I suppose you have to ignore a whole lot of people who die by shipwreck but are only mentioned, not shown on stage), but Ophelia died by drowning.

3. Lignite is the "brown" type of what material?

Coal.

4. The 1986 law allowing employees to continue their healthcare coverage between employers is usually referred to by the name of what reptile?

COBRA.
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  #239  
Old 15 January 2019, 10:48 PM
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1. In addition to their day jobs as peasants, what did hoplites do in ancient Greece? Front line soldiers.

2. Who's the only Shakespearean character to die by drowning? Ophelia.

4. The 1986 law allowing employees to continue their healthcare coverage between employers is usually referred to by the name of what reptile? COBRA.

5. In classic films, what actress played title characters Letty Lynton, Sadie McKee, Mildred Pierce, Daisy Kenyon, and Harriet Craig? Shirley Temple?

6. In 2012, a new genus of ferns was named in honor of what singer, because her name is spelled out in base pairs in its DNA? Lady Gaga.
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  #240  
Old 16 January 2019, 12:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DadOf3 View Post
My apologies about question 7.
One mistake in 3 years. I'd say you are doing OK.

Better than I would.
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