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  #201  
Old 28 February 2011, 06:04 PM
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OK, now that it is after Sunday, I can say that I think number 7 is that karaoke performances of the songs have been featured in movies.
  #202  
Old 01 March 2011, 01:40 PM
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Default Last Week's Answers

LAST WEEK'S ANSWERS

1. The tail of a comet always points in which direction? Away from the sun; it's the solar wind that "blows" ions away from the comet's nucleus. It's true that some comets have two or three tails, because dust and gases are affected differently by solar wind, but the principal tail (the only one whose direction is so predictably and satisfyingly straight!) always points directly away from the sun.

2. Before Santana plays "Black Magic Woman" in concert, the band often reminds the crowd that it's a cover of a song by what other band? It's a Fleetwood Mac song...something that, weirdly, I only learned for the first time last week. (Yes, yes, Watson has known that for years. I've heard it all before.)

3. What U.S. state borders two other states whose two-letter postal abbreviations are reversals of each other, like Minnesota (MN) and New Mexico (NM) are? Mississippi borders both Alabama (AL) and Louisiana (LA).

4. What 1517 document has a full title that ends with the phrase "on the Power and Efficacy of Indulgences"? This was Martin Luther's "Ninety-Five Theses," which--contrary to popular belief--he never actually nailed onto a church door. (He used a Post-It.)

5. Who is still officially the "Eternal President" of his nation, despite having died in 1994? Kim Il-Sung is still officially president of North Korea, which is presumably why his nation is still doing as spectacularly as it was back when he was corporeally running the show.

6. What company made headlines last week by claiming to own a trademark on the word "footlong"? Subway tried to keep a midwestern store chain from using the word "footlong." I want this legal battle settled in the most sensible way possible: a cage match between that "Jared" guy and actor Ron Jeremy.

7. What unusual distinction is shared by these songs? Badfinger's "Without You," The Band's "Sleeping," Cameo's "Word Up," Exile's "Kiss You All Over," Jefferson Airplane's "Somebody to Love," Michael Jackson's "Don't Stop 'Til You Get Enough," Cyndi Lauper's "Time After Time," The Pixies' "Here Comes Your Man," Restless Heart's "The Bluest Eyes in Texas," Roxy Music's "More Than This." These songs were all memorably used as karaoke numbers in the movies. If you're interested, the films are: Bridget Jones's Diary, The Brothers Bloom, The 40-Year-Old Virgin, Wild Hogs, The Cable Guy, Rush Hour 2, Up in the Air, (500) Days of Summer, Boys Don't Cry, and Lost in Translation.
  #203  
Old 01 March 2011, 01:42 PM
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Default This Week's Questions

Per Ken Jennings' request, the trivia challenge discussed on this message board has the number seven question delayed by one week. This is to avoid easy googling of the question which is designed to foil those who would "cheat". If you know the current number seven question, please do not discuss it here.

The Rules of the Thread
1. If you use the thread to help you get answers, do not submit those answers to the official game.
2. No googling until Sunday. No looking anything up anywhere (and posting it) before Sunday. No checking an article in a magazine you read last week. No checking some old notebook from college. No wikipedia. Not even snopes.com. No checking anything, anywhere - until Sunday. Only information that is stored in your brain, or in the brains of your non-snopester friends and family. But you can't use your family members as a work-around to looking up the information yourself.
3. If you google, don't post that information to the thread until Sunday. Not even as confirmation of the guesses of other posters. Someone else might still know the information on their own.
4. No guess is stupid, throw it out there.
5. No Hinting. If you have a guess or a reasonable belief that you have the right answer, post it. If you are attempting to use hinting as a work-around to the no posting googled answers rule, don't.

And remember, this is an exhibition, not a competition, so please... no wagering.

Hey, this is Ken Jennings again. Sorry for last week's mailing being hijacked by IBM's scheming supercomputer Watson--never fear, the human race is back in charge. All it took was a few sizable payments to Watson's secret Swiss bank accounts.

The whole IBM thing brought our little quiz hundreds of new subscribers, so we're now close to 12,000 strong. (Well, maybe "strong" is not the right adjective when it comes to typical fans of email trivia quizzes, but I digress.) If you are a newbie, welcome!

THIS WEEK'S QUESTIONS

1. The title of what classic 1954 novel is the literal English translation of the name of the demon Beelzebub?

2. What comedian has said in interviews that her left earlobe has been measured as a quarter-inch longer than her right one?

3. A 2001 rule change designed to make the game more exciting means that regulation table tennis matches are now played to how many points?

4. Name *two* Best Picture Oscar-winning films co-starring Colin Firth and Geoffrey Rush.

5. What are also called "Roentgen rays" in German-speaking countries?

6. Who is the only currently serving U.S. governor who was also serving in that office more than thirty-five years ago?

7. What unusual distinction is shared by these American novels? Pat Conroy's The Lords of Discipline, Jonathan Franzen's Freedom, John Irving's A Prayer for Owen Meany, Ken Kesey's One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, John Updike's Rabbit Run, Tom Wolfe's I Am Charlotte Simmons.
  #204  
Old 01 March 2011, 01:47 PM
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Default My guesses

Quote:
1. The title of what classic 1954 novel is the literal English translation of the name of the demon Beelzebub?
Lord of the Flies

Quote:
2. What comedian has said in interviews that her left earlobe has been measured as a quarter-inch longer than her right one?
No idea

Quote:
3. A 2001 rule change designed to make the game more exciting means that regulation table tennis matches are now played to how many points?
11

Quote:
4. Name *two* Best Picture Oscar-winning films co-starring Colin Firth and Geoffrey Rush.
The King's Speech and Shakespeare in Love

Quote:
5. What are also called "Roentgen rays" in German-speaking countries?
X-rays

Quote:
6. Who is the only currently serving U.S. governor who was also serving in that office more than thirty-five years ago?
Governor Brown of California

Quote:
7. What unusual distinction is shared by these American novels? Pat Conroy's The Lords of Discipline, Jonathan Franzen's Freedom, John Irving's A Prayer for Owen Meany, Ken Kesey's One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, John Updike's Rabbit Run, Tom Wolfe's I Am Charlotte Simmons.
I have only read One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, so I can't really say.

MacLloyd
  #205  
Old 01 March 2011, 01:47 PM
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1. The title of what classic 1954 novel is the literal English translation of the name of the demon Beelzebub?
Lord of the Flies

2. What comedian has said in interviews that her left earlobe has been measured as a quarter-inch longer than her right one?
Carol Burnett?

3. A 2001 rule change designed to make the game more exciting means that regulation table tennis matches are now played to how many points?
21?

4. Name *two* Best Picture Oscar-winning films co-starring Colin Firth and Geoffrey Rush.
The King's Speech and Shakespeare in Love

5. What are also called "Roentgen rays" in German-speaking countries?
x-rays

6. Who is the only currently serving U.S. governor who was also serving in that office more than thirty-five years ago?
Jerry Brown

7. What unusual distinction is shared by these American novels? Pat Conroy's The Lords of Discipline, Jonathan Franzen's Freedom, John Irving's A Prayer for Owen Meany, Ken Kesey's One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, John Updike's Rabbit Run, Tom Wolfe's I Am Charlotte Simmons.
First person narration by a secondary or minor character? (that doesn't seem terribly unusual, though)
  #206  
Old 01 March 2011, 01:49 PM
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Spam & Cookies-mmm Spam & Cookies-mmm is offline
 
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Carol Burnett, X-rays, and Jerry Brown.
  #207  
Old 01 March 2011, 02:04 PM
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Quote:
5. What are also called "Roentgen rays" in German-speaking countries?
Thank you for this question! The answer is X-Rays, although we would say "Röntgenstrahlen", not "Roentgen rays".

Don Enrico
  #208  
Old 01 March 2011, 02:08 PM
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"Röntgenstrahlen" is hard to spell. I can see why we changed it.
  #209  
Old 01 March 2011, 02:23 PM
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1. The title of what classic 1954 novel is the literal English translation of the name of the demon Beelzebub?

The Lord of the Flies

3. A 2001 rule change designed to make the game more exciting means that regulation table tennis matches are now played to how many points?

11 (I think)

5. What are also called "Roentgen rays" in German-speaking countries?

If you say that they are also called "Röntgen rays" it somehow seems to me that you imply that they are also called X-rays in German (and other Germanic) speaking countries. Even though Röntgen, himself, called them X-rays they aren't.
  #210  
Old 01 March 2011, 02:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spam & Cookies-mmm View Post
"Röntgenstrahlen" is hard to spell. I can see why we changed it.
It wasn't you who changed it. We did it to honour Röntgen.
  #211  
Old 01 March 2011, 06:57 PM
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1. The title of what classic 1954 novel is the literal English translation of the name of the demon Beelzebub?
Lord of the Flies
2. What comedian has said in interviews that her left earlobe has been measured as a quarter-inch longer than her right one?
Carol Burnett
3. A 2001 rule change designed to make the game more exciting means that regulation table tennis matches are now played to how many points?
15?
4. Name *two* Best Picture Oscar-winning films co-starring Colin Firth and Geoffrey Rush.
The King's Speech and, hmm, Shine?
5. What are also called "Roentgen rays" in German-speaking countries?
X-Rays (Thank you, 5th grade science project!)
6. Who is the only currently serving U.S. governor who was also serving in that office more than thirty-five years ago?
Jerry Brown?
7. What unusual distinction is shared by these American novels? Pat Conroy's The Lords of Discipline, Jonathan Franzen's Freedom, John Irving's A Prayer for Owen Meany, Ken Kesey's One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, John Updike's Rabbit Run, Tom Wolfe's I Am Charlotte Simmons.
[/QUOTE]
Only having read the Irving and the Kesey, I'll make a guess: They are all meant to be one long first-person narration? Going more out on a limb, could it be that the narrator is instrumental in the protagonist's death?
  #212  
Old 08 March 2011, 12:47 PM
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Default Last Week's Answers

LAST WEEK'S ANSWERS

1. The title of what classic 1954 novel is the literal English translation of the name of the demon Beelzebub? Beelzebub is the "Lord of the Flies." Michael Flatley is "Lord of the Dance." I always get those two confused...

2. What comedian has said in interviews that her left earlobe has been measured as a quarter-inch longer than her right one? Carol Burnett, presumably the horrifically disfiguring result of her lifelong signature ear-tug sign-off.

3. A 2001 rule change designed to make the game more exciting means that regulation table tennis matches are now played to how many points? Ping-Pongers used to play to 21--now games only go to 11. The resulting flurry of excitement is why Ping-Pong is now on prime time ESPN instead of "the Ocho."

4. Name *two* Best Picture Oscar-winning films co-starring Colin Firth and Geoffrey Rush. The King's Speech is the easy one, but the two doughy Commonwealthers had previously co-starred in Shakespeare in Love as well.

5. What are also called "Roentgen rays" in German-speaking countries? Wilhelm Roentgen invented X-rays. Well, no, he probably discovered them. Maybe a German would claim he invented them.

6. Who is the only currently serving U.S. governor who was also serving in that office more than thirty-five years ago? Jerry Brown. See, even Jerry "Moonbeam" Brown seems to have electable gravitas when the guy he's succeeding is Arnold Schwarzeneggar!

7. I am once again missing the answer to question seven. I am pretty sure I have it at work and will post it once I get there.
  #213  
Old 08 March 2011, 12:48 PM
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MacLloyd MacLloyd is offline
 
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Default This Week's Questions

Per Ken Jennings' request, the trivia challenge discussed on this message board has the number seven question delayed by one week. This is to avoid easy googling of the question which is designed to foil those who would "cheat". If you know the current number seven question, please do not discuss it here.

The Rules of the Thread
1. If you use the thread to help you get answers, do not submit those answers to the official game.
2. No googling until Sunday. No looking anything up anywhere (and posting it) before Sunday. No checking an article in a magazine you read last week. No checking some old notebook from college. No wikipedia. Not even snopes.com. No checking anything, anywhere - until Sunday. Only information that is stored in your brain, or in the brains of your non-snopester friends and family. But you can't use your family members as a work-around to looking up the information yourself.
3. If you google, don't post that information to the thread until Sunday. Not even as confirmation of the guesses of other posters. Someone else might still know the information on their own.
4. No guess is stupid, throw it out there.
5. No Hinting. If you have a guess or a reasonable belief that you have the right answer, post it. If you are attempting to use hinting as a work-around to the no posting googled answers rule, don't.

And remember, this is an exhibition, not a competition, so please... no wagering.


do, rookies: try to give answers that are correct, or at least funny, to the seven questions below. If you get them right, you can brag to family and friends. You can even submit your answers to my website and see your name on the scoreboard.

I got a little behind on Tuesday Trivia with all the time I wasted last week being grilled by Redditors, but the scores should be updated soon at http://ken-jennings.com/messageboard...pic.php?t=6180 . Let the games begin.

THIS WEEK'S QUESTIONS

1. What animal is pictured on the cover of the Black-Eyed Peas' 2003 album, but not the White Stripes' 2003 album?

2. A whopping 2,350 miles of the Tropic of Capricon runs through what nation?

3. What author never got to live in his dream house, a mansion just north of San Francisco called "Wolf House" that burned down in 1913?

4. Who traveled the country on the "Legally Prohibited from Being Funny on Television" tour?

5. What website, one of the U.S's 100 most-visited, has a lot of users currently worried about outages due to its Libyan domain name?

6. What U.S. military slogan was originally half of a couplet, paired with the line "To hell with Spain?"

7. What unusual distinction is shared by these world nations--and no others that I can find? Finland, Guinea, Honduras, Mexico, Oman, Panama, Thailand, Venezuela.
  #214  
Old 08 March 2011, 12:53 PM
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Default

Quote:
1. What animal is pictured on the cover of the Black-Eyed Peas' 2003 album, but not the White Stripes' 2003 album?
An Elephant

Quote:
2. A whopping 2,350 miles of the Tropic of Capricon runs through what nation?
Gotta be Australia

Quote:
3. What author never got to live in his dream house, a mansion just north of San Francisco called "Wolf House" that burned down in 1913?
Jack London????

Quote:
4. Who traveled the country on the "Legally Prohibited from Being Funny on Television" tour?
Conan O'Brien

Quote:
5. What website, one of the U.S's 100 most-visited, has a lot of users currently worried about outages due to its Libyan domain name?
No idea

Quote:
6. What U.S. military slogan was originally half of a couplet, paired with the line "To hell with Spain?"
"Remember the Maine"

Quote:
7. What unusual distinction is shared by these world nations--and no others that I can find? Finland, Guinea, Honduras, Mexico, Oman, Panama, Thailand, Venezuela.
Do not know

MacLloyd
  #215  
Old 08 March 2011, 12:56 PM
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5.) bit.ly
  #216  
Old 08 March 2011, 12:59 PM
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Don Enrico Don Enrico is offline
 
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Quote:
2. A whopping 2,350 miles of the Tropic of Capricon runs through what nation?
Brasilia?

Quote:
7. What unusual distinction is shared by these world nations--and no others that I can find? Finland, Guinea, Honduras, Mexico, Oman, Panama, Thailand, Venezuela.
Being mentioned in Monty Python songs?

Don Enrico
  #217  
Old 08 March 2011, 01:12 PM
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Quote:
1. What animal is pictured on the cover of the Black-Eyed Peas' 2003 album, but not the White Stripes' 2003 album?
Elephant
Quote:
2. A whopping 2,350 miles of the Tropic of Capricorn runs through what nation?
Australia
Quote:
4. Who traveled the country on the "Legally Prohibited from Being Funny on Television" tour?
Conan O'Brien
  #218  
Old 08 March 2011, 01:47 PM
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MacLloyd MacLloyd is offline
 
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Default Question Seven Answer

7. What unusual distinction is shared by these American novels? Pat Conroy's The Lords of Discipline, Jonathan Franzen's Freedom, John Irving's A Prayer for Owen Meany, Ken Kesey's One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, John Updike's Rabbit Run, Tom Wolfe's I Am Charlotte Simmons. The sport of basketball is a crucial plot element in each. You know, there are surprisingly few great basketball novels. I was trying to make this list longer than six and had no luck. (Jim Carroll's The Basketball Diaries is obviously not optimal for these purposes.)
  #219  
Old 08 March 2011, 01:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MacLloyd View Post
Ping-Pongers used to play to 21--now games only go to 11. The resulting flurry of excitement is why Ping-Pong is now on prime time ESPN instead of "the Ocho."
Please, the game is called table tennis. Nobody who wants to be taken seriously calls it ping-pong.
  #220  
Old 08 March 2011, 03:38 PM
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Andrew of Ware Andrew of Ware is offline
 
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I've heard that the person - a British person, of course - who invented table tennis loriginally called it Whiff Whaff. The original pieces of equipment were wooden cigar box lids and champagne corks.

It was eventually patented as a sport by the sports equipment manufacturer John Jacques in London in 1901 and it was then called Ping Pong. As the Mayor London, Boris Johnson, said at the Olympic handover ceremony in 2008:

Quote:
'The French looked at a dining table and saw an opportunity to have dinner.

'We looked at a dining table and saw an opportunity to play whiff-whaff.'

This is the reason, claimed Boris, that Britain has such a rich sporting heritage.

'Ping pong is coming home,' he concluded (this being the Victorians' other favoured name for their invention).
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...iff-whaff.html

Er .. now what was the question?
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