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  #1081  
Old 04 September 2018, 12:40 PM
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Tricky - I don't know any of them, even though there are a couple I should know!

Guesses:

3. Presumably a Danish physicist but it can't be Niels Bohr because he's too recent to have been friends with Hans Christian Andersen and isn't famous for anything to do with electromagnetism anyway (and that particular discovery is too early for him). Bah! That should easily narrow it down enough to get it, but I have a mental block. And I feel it's something that I've heard before but forgotten. Was Coulomb Danish, I wonder? I will guess him for the sake of a guess.

4. I like Brasher walking boots and tend to associate him with mountaineering and hiking, but I think this is Chris Bannister (for the four minute mile).

Quote:
Originally Posted by DadOf3 View Post
7. What unusual distinction is shared by all these songs? "America" by Simon & Garfunkel, "Army of Me" by Bjork, "Cornflake Girl" by Tori Amos, "Fields of Gold" by Sting, "The Inner Light" by the Beatles, "Karma Police" by Radiohead, "Parklife" by Blur, "So. Central Rain" by R.E.M., "White Room" by Cream.
An unusual number of songs that I actually know, for once. I'm going to listen to some of them now to see if I can work it out. (I've got half of them on my iPod so it's not cheating). (eta) It could even be musicgeek's guess, although that wouldn't have occurred to me as an unusual distinction myself...

Last edited by Richard W; 04 September 2018 at 12:48 PM.
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  #1082  
Old 04 September 2018, 12:49 PM
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1. Make the wearer invisible.

2. Frederick Douglass.

3. Oersted.

4. Don't know.

5. Cameo.

6. I know VW Beetles were popular as taxis there for a while. Not sure if that went as late as 2006, but I can't think of anything else, so I'll go with that.

7. Nothing comes to mind.
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  #1083  
Old 04 September 2018, 03:32 PM
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4. Chris Brasher and Chris Chataway are best known for pacing whom on May 6, 1954?

Roger Bannister

6. At their peak in 2006, over half the taxis in Mexico City were what model of car, making it an iconic symbol of the city?

Volkswagen Beetle
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  #1084  
Old 04 September 2018, 03:57 PM
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Bah, I knew I had his first name wrong but couldn't think of anything else! It was obvious who I meant, anyway.
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  #1085  
Old 04 September 2018, 03:59 PM
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Seaboe Muffinchucker Seaboe Muffinchucker is offline
 
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Glasses

Lots of guesses this week.
Quote:
Originally Posted by DadOf3 View Post
THIS WEEK'S QUESTIONS

1. Plato's "Ring of Gyges" and the mythological Cap of Hades both possessed what unusual power?
Invisibility.
Quote:


2. Influenced by William Lloyd Garrison's The Liberator, who began his own newspaper, The North Star, in 1847?
Frederick Douglass
Quote:


3. What scientist, who discovered that electric currents affect magnets, was a close friend of author Hans Christian Andersen?
Niels Bohr?
Quote:


4. Chris Brasher and Chris Chataway are best known for pacing whom on May 6, 1954?
Must be Roger Bannister
Quote:


5. What moviemaking term was borrowed from the world of jewelry, where it's an engraving method similar to intaglio?
Cameo
Quote:


6. At their peak in 2006, over half the taxis in Mexico City were what model of car, making it an iconic symbol of the city?
VW?
Quote:


7. What unusual distinction is shared by all these songs? "America" by Simon & Garfunkel, "Army of Me" by Bjork, "Cornflake Girl" by Tori Amos, "Fields of Gold" by Sting, "The Inner Light" by the Beatles, "Karma Police" by Radiohead, "Parklife" by Blur, "So. Central Rain" by R.E.M., "White Room" by Cream.
I've heard exactly 3 of these songs, and know only 1 of them well. I'm going to say they all mention bus stations.

Seaboe
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  #1086  
Old 04 September 2018, 04:14 PM
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That's the one for #1, Seaboe! Should have remembered.
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  #1087  
Old 05 September 2018, 06:27 PM
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1. Cap goes on a head, I am guessing mind reading.

2. Mark Twain?

3. Danish? Bohr?

4. Bannister

5. Jewellery? Silver screen?

6. VW Bug

7. I can't say I've listened to a single one of these songs.
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  #1088  
Old 05 September 2018, 07:30 PM
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I think I've got number 7 - I believe they all end on a incomplete sentence.
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  #1089  
Old 05 September 2018, 08:10 PM
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How would you tell with an R.E.M. song?

I'm not sure that's it... just listening to the ones I own again (still not cheating?) and the last line of So. Central Rain is "I'm sorry", the last line of Karma Police is "I lost myself", for Cornflake Girl it's "Where'd'you put the keys, girl?" and for America it's "All gone to look for America". Except for Simon & Garfunkel, the rest are complete sentences, I think. (For R.E.M. that must be one of the rare complete sentences in any of their songs from that era!). I don't own Parklife but I think the last lines are a repeat of "Parklife" in a fade.

All those lines are repeated phrases that form a kind of chorus, and it could be something to do with having that as the song structure, but I don't know what the term would be if there is one. (Not hiding this because I don't think I'm giving anything away!) Musicgeek's guess still fits I think, it just seems a little arguable.
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  #1090  
Old 05 September 2018, 08:28 PM
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This may not be specific enough, but is it that they are all written in the 2nd person (more specifically, addressed to a "you" at some points), or parts of them are? Or that they shift perspectives? I'm only familiar with a couple of them.
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  #1091  
Old 11 September 2018, 01:22 PM
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Tuesday trivia time, y'all.

LAST WEEK'S ANSWERS

1. Plato's "Ring of Gyges" and the mythological Cap of Hades both possessed what unusual power?
Just like Siegfried's and Harry Potter's cloaks, they grant invisibility to the wearer.

2. Influenced by William Lloyd Garrison's The Liberator, who began his own newspaper, The North Star, in 1847?
The North Star, a symbol of freedom to escaping slaves, lent its name to Frederick Douglass's publishing industry debut.

3. What scientist, who discovered that electric currents affect magnets, was a close friend of author Hans Christian Andersen?
The 19th-century Danish pioneer of electromagnetism was Hans Christian Oersted. I'm just going to assume all Danes, then and now, are named Hans Christian.

4. Chris Brasher and Chris Chataway are best known for pacing whom on May 6, 1954?
They were the fellow Oxford students who traded off pacing Roger Bannister on his historic four-minute mile.

5. What moviemaking term was borrowed from the world of jewelry, where it's an engraving method similar to intaglio?
Intaglio is a positive carving technique, so the image is raised above the surface stone. When the image is negative, etched into the background stone, that's a cameo.

6. At their peak in 2006, over half the taxis in Mexico City were what model of car, making it an iconic symbol of the city?
Volkswagen Beetles are affectionately called "vochos" in Mexico, where they've been a hit since the 1950s. Today, they've largely been replaced with quieter, safer, and more eco-friendly cab models.

7. What unusual distinction is shared by all these songs? "America" by Simon & Garfunkel, "Army of Me" by Bjork, "Cornflake Girl" by Tori Amos, "Fields of Gold" by Sting, "The Inner Light" by the Beatles, "Karma Police" by Radiohead, "Parklife" by Blur, "So. Central Rain" by R.E.M., "White Room" by Cream.
The lyrics of each song are entirely unrhymed. And I mean entirely; you can't imagine how many songs I had to drop because they have ONE pair of rhyming words. Like "knew me" and "through me" in "Breakfast at Tiffany's" by Deep Blue Something!

THIS WEEK'S QUESTIONS

1. Jessica Tandy, Julie Harris, Jessica Lange, Cherry Jones and Sally Field played Amanda Wingfield in the five most recent Broadway revivals of what play?

2. What word do sailors use today in place of the archaic term "larboard"?

3. Who created the TV sketch characters Floyd R. Turbo, Art Fern, and Carnac the Magnificent?

4. The capital of Uganda took its name from a Lugandan phrase meaning "hill of" what abundant local mammal?

5. What title word was a hit for Kool & the Gang when used once, for Smashing Pumpkins when used twice, and for Genesis when used three times?

6. What three things can coexist in equilibrium at a substance's triple point?

7. What unusual distinction is shared by all these actors? Audrey Hepburn, Mads Mikkelsen, Zoe Saldana, Channing Tatum, Charlize Theron, Alicia Vikander, Christopher Walken, Michael K. Williams.

Enjoy!
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  #1092  
Old 11 September 2018, 01:37 PM
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2. What word do sailors use today in place of the archaic term "larboard"?

Port

4. The capital of Uganda took its name from a Lugandan phrase meaning "hill of" what abundant local mammal?

I have no idea. Jackal?
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  #1093  
Old 11 September 2018, 01:41 PM
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Ha, I almost misread the question and guessed "Holly Golightly" for 1. I'm sure I should know the capital of Uganda - maybe it will come back to me.

2. Port. (One I do know).

5. Hmm, Smashing Pumpkins have a song Try, Try, Try but that's the wrong number of repetitions according to the question. The word must be Tonight. (And their Tonight, Tonight is a better-known song than the other anyway).

6. The solid, liquid and gaseous phases of that substance.


Quote:
Originally Posted by DadOf3 View Post
7. What unusual distinction is shared by all these actors? Audrey Hepburn, Mads Mikkelsen, Zoe Saldana, Channing Tatum, Charlize Theron, Alicia Vikander, Christopher Walken, Michael K. Williams.
Pure guess, but have they all featured in adverts after having had their digital image superimposed into it from a different source? Or something to do with digital roles anyway.

(eta) I think at least a couple of them are also pretty good dancers - have they all done that professionally? Or would that not be unusual for an actor even if true?

Last edited by Richard W; 11 September 2018 at 01:47 PM.
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  #1094  
Old 11 September 2018, 02:01 PM
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Whalephant

I think #1 is The Glass Menagerie.

#4- lions?
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  #1095  
Old 11 September 2018, 02:12 PM
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2. What word do sailors use today in place of the archaic term "larboard"?

Port

4. The capital of Uganda took its name from a Lugandan phrase meaning "hill of" what abundant local mammal?
impalas, since it sort of rhyme with Kampala?

5. What title word was a hit for Kool & the Gang when used once, for Smashing Pumpkins when used twice, and for Genesis when used three times? tonight?

6. What three things can coexist in equilibrium at a substance's triple point?
liquid, solid and gas
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  #1096  
Old 11 September 2018, 02:53 PM
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1. The Glass Menagerie.

2. Don't know.

3. Johnny Carson.

4. Don't know.

5. Tonight.

6. Phases of matter.

7. Nothing comes to mind.
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  #1097  
Old 11 September 2018, 03:03 PM
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1. Jessica Tandy, Julie Harris, Jessica Lange, Cherry Jones and Sally Field played Amanda Wingfield in the five most recent Broadway revivals of what play? The Glass Menagerie

2. What word do sailors use today in place of the archaic term "larboard"? port

3. Who created the TV sketch characters Floyd R. Turbo, Art Fern, and Carnac the Magnificent? Johnny Carson

4. The capital of Uganda took its name from a Lugandan phrase meaning "hill of" what abundant local mammal? WAG - buffalo?

5. What title word was a hit for Kool & the Gang when used once, for Smashing Pumpkins when used twice, and for Genesis when used three times? Tonight

6. What three things can coexist in equilibrium at a substance's triple point? Solid, Liquid, Gas?

7. What unusual distinction is shared by all these actors? Audrey Hepburn, Mads Mikkelsen, Zoe Saldana, Channing Tatum, Charlize Theron, Alicia Vikander, Christopher Walken, Michael K. Williams. I think Richard W might be on to something here. I know that it's true for a few of them; I'll go ahead and say worked professionally as a dancer, even if it's not necessarily that unusual.
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  #1098  
Old 11 September 2018, 03:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DadOf3 View Post
THIS WEEK'S QUESTIONS

1. Jessica Tandy, Julie Harris, Jessica Lange, Cherry Jones and Sally Field played Amanda Wingfield in the five most recent Broadway revivals of what play?
I feel as if I should know this because of the Tandy-Harris-Lange sequence, but I don't, so I'm going to say The Glass Menagerie ETA: I totally did not expect to have the right answer. My unconscious works in mysterious ways.
Quote:


2. What word do sailors use today in place of the archaic term "larboard"?
port?
Quote:


3. Who created the TV sketch characters Floyd R. Turbo, Art Fern, and Carnac the Magnificent?
Johnny Carson
Quote:


4. The capital of Uganda took its name from a Lugandan phrase meaning "hill of" what abundant local mammal?
You know, I did so well last week... marmots.
Quote:


5. What title word was a hit for Kool & the Gang when used once, for Smashing Pumpkins when used twice, and for Genesis when used three times?
Yes. or No. Or something else entirely
Quote:


6. What three things can coexist in equilibrium at a substance's triple point?
I can't even begin to think of an answer, funny or serious. Height, weight, and circumference, I guess.
Quote:


7. What unusual distinction is shared by all these actors? Audrey Hepburn, Mads Mikkelsen, Zoe Saldana, Channing Tatum, Charlize Theron, Alicia Vikander, Christopher Walken, Michael K. Williams.
Enjoy!
They all suffered from malnutrition as children.

Seaboe
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  #1099  
Old 11 September 2018, 03:22 PM
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2. What word do sailors use today in place of the archaic term "larboard"?

I suspect that is the opposite of "starbord", so the answer is: "port"
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  #1100  
Old 11 September 2018, 08:17 PM
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Baseball 2 for 7 this week, I believe

1. Don't know. Cats?

2. Port!

3. [Puts envelope to my head] Johnny Carson. Used to love watching him do them

4. The Lion? [after seeing another answer, my response in my head is, d'oh!]

5. Yes?

6. Liquid, solid and gas?

7. All Americans whose wax likenesses can only be found at Madame Tussaud's in London. (I have no clue if this is correct, but yesterday marked the 78th anniversary of the bombing of Mme Tussaud's Wax Museum by the Luftwaffe and it was on my mind.)
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