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  #1  
Old 30 May 2013, 10:58 PM
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Default Sperm Donor Case Won't Be Heard By Supreme Court

Olivia Pratten had long ago come to terms with the reality that she would likely never know the identity of her biological father.

Pratten was born in Nanaimo, B.C., in 1982 after her parents, who couldn't conceive on their own, turned to sperm donation.

When, at 19, she asked the doctor who oversaw the procedure for more information about the donor, he refused. When she pressed the issue in court, she was told the records related to her case had been destroyed.

With the Supreme Court of Canada announcing Thursday it will not hear her case, Pratten says more children like her will have no way to learn the identities of the sperm donors who helped bring them into the world.


http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2013/05...n_3359567.html
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  #2  
Old 31 May 2013, 01:50 PM
overyonder overyonder is offline
 
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Isn't it the whole idea behind being "anonymous"?

OY
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Old 31 May 2013, 02:00 PM
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Pratten claims that she is only asking for information that is available already to adopted children but that's not quite accurate. Anyone who gave up a child for adoption prior to the laws being changed in 1996 can block a child from finding out who they are - if she wants the laws changed to reflect current adoption laws she might still find that there are going to be a lot of people who cannot access this information and I don't see adoption laws being changed again anytime soon.

Last edited by Sue; 31 May 2013 at 02:17 PM.
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Old 31 May 2013, 02:52 PM
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Isn't it the whole idea behind being "anonymous"?

OY
Yes, it is. She doesn't believe it should be possible to donate sperm anonymously.
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  #5  
Old 31 May 2013, 02:59 PM
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I know it's often a plot point on TV shows (usually played for humour) that guys donate sperm for some reason and don't seem to ever give it another thought. I wonder if that's the case for the average donor. Do they ever think about the children they may help produce? Would they ever want contact? Somehow I think if the rules were changed there would be a big drop both in donors and in women prepared to go to a clinic if there is a possibility that she will have to maintain some form of contact with a total stranger.
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Old 31 May 2013, 03:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Lainie View Post
Yes, it is. She doesn't believe it should be possible to donate sperm anonymously.
Which is fine if she wants the law to be changed, but I don't think she should have the right to make it retroactive. And by making it illegal to destroy the records, it would make it retroactive for anyone who had donated under the old records but had not yet had their records destroyed.
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Old 31 May 2013, 03:37 PM
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Yes, I agree it's wrong to allow someone to give sperm under condition of anonymity and then take that anonymity away. I feel the same way about adoption.

Maybe they could do a mutual consent registry for sperm donors and the resulting children.
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Old 31 May 2013, 07:15 PM
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Originally Posted by Sue View Post
Olivia Pratten had long ago come to terms with the reality that she would likely never know the identity of her biological father.
It sounds to me as if this is false: she had not and has not come to terms with it, or she would not have pursued it this far.

Seaboe
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  #9  
Old 31 May 2013, 07:32 PM
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It sounds to me as if this is false: she had not and has not come to terms with it, or she would not have pursued it this far.
I wouldn't say that. A person can come to terms with the notion that a particular effort is likely to fail, even as s/he continues to pursue it in the small chance that it might succeed.
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Old 31 May 2013, 07:37 PM
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Wouldn't "coming to terms" mean that the issue is settled? I assume the phrase comes from coming to terms on a deal; you have agreed to accept the conditions, or terms. If you are still arguing your.case, or still haggling, you have not yet reached "terms".
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Old 31 May 2013, 07:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seaboe Muffinchucker View Post
It sounds to me as if this is false: she had not and has not come to terms with it, or she would not have pursued it this far.

Seaboe
I think she's pursued it as a matter of principle. But I do agree with you I think she it's possible that she has some issues with the way that she was conceived and I'd wonder how her parents have felt about her court battle.
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Old 31 May 2013, 08:00 PM
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Wouldn't "coming to terms" mean that the issue is settled?
No, in a general sense it means to acknowledge and accept and deal with an issue.

For example, most of us have come to terms with the notion that we're not going to enjoy lives of luxury as multi-millionaires -- we don't spend money as if we were lavishly rich, and we don't base our future plans on the expectation that we ever will be. Yet even though we've long since come to terms with that notion, some of us still play the lottery anyway, because there's a chance (even if it's scarcely larger than zero) that it might happen.
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Old 31 May 2013, 08:29 PM
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I feel that the records should remain anonymous, I do not feel they should be destroyed. I feel that destroying information about bloodlines is a crime against preserving history. I also would love to see a way that dna records could be in an anonymous database, where an adopted/sperm recipient could verify that they are not related to life partners, great idea, but c'mon... realistically does she see that being a viable solution at any point in the near future? If it's such a big deal then couldn't they just get their own dna test? Anyways, I would not be happy to find out that I was sleeping with my sister, but... assuming it was even possible for me to get her pregnant, which, well... anyways, it would be an icky thought but really probably not a big deal for the child. Bloodlines are spread out enough at this point that one intermixing of blood will probably not hurt.
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Old 31 May 2013, 08:52 PM
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Oddly, I have a genetic profile done, by a company that is using it as cross referencing for various studies (they are always asking my to take surveys). They may also be using it to clone an army of super-gimpy warriors, who k.ows.I think that as this becomes cheaper, it will become a lot more common, if only for the information I have gotten on various disease risks.* That will make preventing accidental incest easy. And let's face it, that is possible even when mom and dad are married. Adding an opt in search function would also make finding birth families/children who wish to be found easier. And for those who don't want to be found? It works then too, seeing as how "medical history" is the only seriously good argument for an adoptee having an absolute right to contct their birth family, and a genetic profile is a better risk assessment tool than a verbal medical history.


*I did it because I have a weird illness (couple of them actually, but who's counting?) and I wanted to see if it was caused by weird genes. Turns out it is. It is kind of strange to see that yup, you were more likely than most to get exactly what you already knew you had.
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  #15  
Old 01 June 2013, 09:34 PM
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I also had genetic testing and sequencing done, and although it was really helpful, it was also almost $3,500 at the time, though it may be cheaper currently. A simple DNA test though is probably less than $150. And, honestly, what difference does it make if it turns out you are related? It's unlikely to cause problems, and they weren't raised together. It's just the ick factor in knowing, but if you don't know, you don't know... you know?
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Old 01 June 2013, 09:50 PM
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Mine was 200 dollars. Give it another decade and it will probably be less than half of that.
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  #17  
Old 01 June 2013, 10:53 PM
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Originally Posted by nonnieyrissa View Post
And, honestly, what difference does it make if it turns out you are related? It's unlikely to cause problems, and they weren't raised together. It's just the ick factor in knowing, but if you don't know, you don't know... you know?
Sure, but in that case you aren't thinking about it and you aren't going out to get tested. It's really not an ick factor at all. I can understand and sympathize with an adopted child or a child conceived through artificial insemination who is concerned about something like this. I would hazard a guess though (based solely on the adoptees I know personally) that most don't spend much, if any time, worrying they're going to marry their brother or their cousin. What they worry about are health issues that they might have inherited.
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Old 01 June 2013, 11:56 PM
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Wow, I only had mine done a few years ago, has the price dropped so low, or was the $200 the price for your insurance copay?

Sue, why does it really matter though? There would be little to no effect on the offspring, and the social reasoning against incest has no relevance in adopted/sperm donation examples of incest. So why should they care?

ETA-Apparently the rates for genetic testing start as low as $100, depending on what they are looking for. One pf the tests I had(the most expensive of the 2, even though the other tested for a wide rage of autoimmune disorders and other) for a specific strain of BRCA2 is still around $3000, but that's still a 25% drop in a few years...
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