snopes.com  

Go Back   snopes.com > SLC Central > Social Studies

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #61  
Old 24 October 2018, 11:22 PM
Richard W's Avatar
Richard W Richard W is offline
 
Join Date: 19 February 2000
Location: High Wycombe, UK
Posts: 26,334
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by WildaBeast View Post
According to one of the commenters that's how the Japanese pronounce it.
I think Japanese pronunciation tends to stress the syllables more evenly than English does. We (as English-speakers in general, so across international accents) would tend to stress one or more of the syllables, often either the first or last. In "Subaru" I would stress both the first and last, and the middle syllable gets a bit lost.

So if the Japanese pronunciation doesn't involve any particular stress, it would sound to us as though they were stressing the middle syllable.
Reply With Quote
  #62  
Old 25 October 2018, 12:38 AM
RichardM RichardM is offline
 
Join Date: 27 March 2004
Location: Las Cruces, NM
Posts: 4,552
Default

I recall that Subaru asked the marketing managers in each country how it should be pronounced in their country. Thus American (as in the USA) got a different pronunciation than did other English speaking countries. Of course, the Japanese did not know that the USA marketing manager was from Lapland.
Reply With Quote
  #63  
Old 25 October 2018, 01:43 AM
kitap's Avatar
kitap kitap is offline
 
Join Date: 20 January 2001
Location: Tucson, AZ
Posts: 9,851
Whalephant

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChasFink


kitapr?
Ha! No. Mariter instead of Marita.
Reply With Quote
  #64  
Old 25 October 2018, 01:59 AM
ganzfeld's Avatar
ganzfeld ganzfeld is offline
 
Join Date: 05 September 2005
Location: Kyoto, Japan
Posts: 23,654
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard W View Post
So if the Japanese pronunciation doesn't involve any particular stress, it would sound to us as though they were stressing the middle syllable.
Yeah, I think that's it exactly. There may be a slight accent in there in some words but very flat in most cases.
Reply With Quote
  #65  
Old 25 October 2018, 10:59 PM
UrbanLegends101 UrbanLegends101 is offline
 
Join Date: 24 November 2010
Location: Florida
Posts: 1,362
Default

On the subject of regionalisms, the brand name Robitussin.

I normally pronounce it "row-bi-tus-sin" with the accent on the tus.

In the Philippines, the more common pronunciation was "row-bit-ta-sin" with the accent on the bit.
Reply With Quote
  #66  
Old 26 October 2018, 03:08 AM
thorny locust's Avatar
thorny locust thorny locust is offline
 
Join Date: 27 April 2007
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 9,586
Default

I pronounce it with the accent on the Ro. Roh -bit-us-in.

I have no idea whether that's a regionalism or just me being weird, though. While I've occasionally bought the stuff, I don't think I've ever asked for it by name.
Reply With Quote
  #67  
Old 26 October 2018, 01:58 PM
ChasFink's Avatar
ChasFink ChasFink is offline
 
Join Date: 09 December 2015
Location: Mineola, NY
Posts: 919
No

While we're discussing pronunciation of the same thing in different countries, as someone who grew up in a house where many people spoke Polish I'm always amused by Americans who put too many syllables into consonant-heavy Polish words and names. When Zbigniew Brzezinski was National Security Advisor, many newspeople pronounced his name za-BIG-new, when it's ZBIG-nyef, with the initial sound kind of like the middle of "buzZBomb". Related is when English speakers don't even attempt to pronounce letters the way they're pronounced in the native tongue. On Jeopardy! the other day, Alex Trebek (known for his accurate pronunciation of French and other languages) pronounced the Polish city of Łdź (spelled "Lodz", without diacritical marks, on the game board) as if it were an English word, when it's actually pronounced something like "woodge".
Reply With Quote
  #68  
Old 26 October 2018, 02:16 PM
thorny locust's Avatar
thorny locust thorny locust is offline
 
Join Date: 27 April 2007
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 9,586
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChasFink View Post
When Zbigniew Brzezinski was National Security Advisor, many newspeople pronounced his name za-BIG-new, when it's ZBIG-nyef, with the initial sound kind of like the middle of "buzZBomb".
I don't think I could help but pronounce it wrong. That is, if the name ends with an f sound instead of a w sound, I could manage that; but I never learned to, and don't think I now can, wrap my mouth around "zb" in a way that doesn't introduce either a vowel or a syllable break inbetweed the z and the b. I'd pronounce "buzzbomb" like two separate words; there's a pause inbetween the syllables.
Reply With Quote
  #69  
Old 26 October 2018, 02:43 PM
Richard W's Avatar
Richard W Richard W is offline
 
Join Date: 19 February 2000
Location: High Wycombe, UK
Posts: 26,334
Default

Presumably you can say "sp-" words like "Spanish" or "spelling" though? "Zb-" doesn't seem much different from those, to me - at least if you can say one, you should be able to say the other; you're just making both sounds a little harder.
Reply With Quote
  #70  
Old 26 October 2018, 03:12 PM
Seaboe Muffinchucker's Avatar
Seaboe Muffinchucker Seaboe Muffinchucker is offline
 
Join Date: 30 June 2005
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 18,811
Glasses

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChasFink View Post
pronunciation of the same thing in different countries.
This is why attempts to force English to use phonetic spelling fail. Because the phonetics would represent only one pronunciation, and for just about every word, there are many.

Seaboe
Reply With Quote
  #71  
Old 26 October 2018, 03:16 PM
thorny locust's Avatar
thorny locust thorny locust is offline
 
Join Date: 27 April 2007
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 9,586
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard W View Post
Presumably you can say "sp-" words like "Spanish" or "spelling" though? "Zb-" doesn't seem much different from those, to me - at least if you can say one, you should be able to say the other; you're just making both sounds a little harder.
Sounds kind of logical; but it just doesn't work.

-- what's happening between 's' and 'p' seems to be just that my lips close. Other portions of my mouth move between 'z' and 'b'.
Reply With Quote
  #72  
Old 26 October 2018, 03:27 PM
Seaboe Muffinchucker's Avatar
Seaboe Muffinchucker Seaboe Muffinchucker is offline
 
Join Date: 30 June 2005
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 18,811
Glasses

Theoretically (because, as Thorny said, it doesn't work that way for everyone), the only differences between s and z is that the latter is voiced and the former is not (i.e., your vocal chords are involved). Same with p and b.

Seaboe
Reply With Quote
  #73  
Old 26 October 2018, 03:42 PM
ChasFink's Avatar
ChasFink ChasFink is offline
 
Join Date: 09 December 2015
Location: Mineola, NY
Posts: 919
Default

Richard W's "sp" point is a good one. If you say Spig-nyeff you're much closer to saying it correctly than with the extra syllable.
Reply With Quote
  #74  
Old 26 October 2018, 03:58 PM
hotrod hotrod is offline
 
Join Date: 24 May 2002
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 881
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GenYus234 View Post
How do you pronounce the car brand "Hyundai". In the US, I usually hear it as "Hun-die"* but in Australia it was "H-yun-die". Hyundai themselves aren't much help as they seem to tailor the pronunciation to the region.

* Oddly enough, also a WWI slogan.
The pronunciation in Korean is Hyun-day. Samsung is pronounced Sawm-sung in Korea but not in North American ads.
Reply With Quote
  #75  
Old 26 October 2018, 04:30 PM
Lainie's Avatar
Lainie Lainie is offline
 
Join Date: 29 August 2005
Location: Suburban Columbus, OH
Posts: 74,505
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChasFink View Post
While we're discussing pronunciation of the same thing in different countries, as someone who grew up in a house where many people spoke Polish I'm always amused by Americans who put too many syllables into consonant-heavy Polish words and names.
Another way to describe that would be "people struggling to reproduce an entirely unfamiliar sound." I'm sure you don't actually ridicule people who are making a good faith effort, but imagine a native English speaker posting how they're "always amused" by non-native speakers' attempts at pronouncing the language.
Reply With Quote
  #76  
Old 26 October 2018, 04:31 PM
hotrod hotrod is offline
 
Join Date: 24 May 2002
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 881
Default

I've heard some people from the UK pronounce the word "clerk" to sound like "clark". Do they also pronounce "herd" the same as "hard"?
Reply With Quote
  #77  
Old 26 October 2018, 05:06 PM
erwins's Avatar
erwins erwins is offline
 
Join Date: 04 April 2006
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 12,226
Default

There's a similar issue with the name Knut, which winds up with either too many syllables or a silent K when typically pronounced in English. In Norwegian, the K is pronounced, but an extra syllables is not introduced. In English, it usually winds up as either "Newt" or "Canewt." I recognize, though, that 1) Americans typically have to choose one of those because they can't hear and/or pronounce the subtle difference, and b) if the person with the name Knut is not Scandinavian, one of those pronunciations may well be correct because it is how the person pronounces their name.

This page has a pronunciation that is close to the Norwegian one, and then a pronunciation of "Canute" at the bottom of the page, for anyone curious to hear the difference. https://www.dictionary.com/browse/knut
Reply With Quote
  #78  
Old 26 October 2018, 05:33 PM
WildaBeast's Avatar
WildaBeast WildaBeast is online now
 
Join Date: 18 July 2002
Location: Folsom, CA
Posts: 15,746
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChasFink View Post
Related is when English speakers don't even attempt to pronounce letters the way they're pronounced in the native tongue.
That reminds of when I went to Germany about a decade ago. At the time my sister was living there and learning to speak German, and since she was learning the language she pronounced the name of the Berlin subway system, the U-Bahn, the correct German way. Rendered in English it would be something like "OO-Bahn", the "oo" pronounced like in "goo" or "too". When we were walking around we happened to overhear a couple of other American tourists, who called the U-Bahn "that U thing", pronouncing the U the English way, like "you". Knowing how it was supposed to be pronounced it really grated on me.
Reply With Quote
  #79  
Old 26 October 2018, 05:56 PM
ChasFink's Avatar
ChasFink ChasFink is offline
 
Join Date: 09 December 2015
Location: Mineola, NY
Posts: 919
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lainie View Post
Another way to describe that would be "people struggling to reproduce an entirely unfamiliar sound." I'm sure you don't actually ridicule people who are making a good faith effort, but imagine a native English speaker posting how they're "always amused" by non-native speakers' attempts at pronouncing the language.
Actually I am sometimes amused by that, too. (And I am a native English speaker, and one who doesn't speak Polish well at all.) In neither case am I ridiculing the person trying to make an effort, or even the person who doesn't realize there's an effort to be made. It's just interesting to see how people try to pronounce written words (not reproduce a sound they heard) and to what extent they succeed. For someone like me who has a slightly better idea how some of those words are pronounced, it can bring a smile. I am also amused by my own inability to do the same; I have a horrible time trying to figure out where the syllable breaks are in some Indian and Thai names, for example.
Reply With Quote
  #80  
Old 26 October 2018, 06:00 PM
Darth Credence's Avatar
Darth Credence Darth Credence is offline
 
Join Date: 28 October 2005
Location: Salt Lake City, UT
Posts: 3,583
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by erwins View Post
There's a similar issue with the name Knut, which winds up with either too many syllables or a silent K when typically pronounced in English. In Norwegian, the K is pronounced, but an extra syllables is not introduced. In English, it usually winds up as either "Newt" or "Canewt." I recognize, though, that 1) Americans typically have to choose one of those because they can't hear and/or pronounce the subtle difference, and b) if the person with the name Knut is not Scandinavian, one of those pronunciations may well be correct because it is how the person pronounces their name.

This page has a pronunciation that is close to the Norwegian one, and then a pronunciation of "Canute" at the bottom of the page, for anyone curious to hear the difference. https://www.dictionary.com/browse/knut
I can absolutely tell the difference between the pronunciation of Knut there and the linked pronunciation of Canute. However, I wouldn't say that the pronunciation of Knut was a single syllable. That's a strange little quirk. (On my part, I mean).
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Super Bowl Commercial Discussion GenYus234 Amusement Bark 20 06 February 2018 03:31 PM
Rogue 1 Discussion (SPOILERS!) TallGeekyGirl Amusement Bark 26 27 December 2016 09:52 AM
'Australia has no freedom,' Fox News host claims in discussion on gun laws BrianB Soapbox Derby 49 15 October 2015 01:17 AM
Facebook bans discussion of British foodstuff GaryM Weird News 9 09 November 2013 12:19 PM
Contribute to civil discussion snopes Snopes Spotting 8 14 March 2011 08:43 PM


All times are GMT. The time now is 02:02 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.