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  #261  
Old 07 January 2018, 10:13 PM
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WildaBeast WildaBeast is online now
 
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Since we're on the subject, is my dad's stepfather my grandfather, from a genealogical perspective? I always thought of him as my grandfather, in fact he was more of a grandfather to me than my "biological" grandfather. He and my grandmother were the ones we visited when I was a kid, while I never actually met my biological grandfather. But would a genealogist call him my grandfather?

Along the same lines, is my dad's stepbrother my uncle?
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  #262  
Old 07 January 2018, 10:22 PM
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We were relatively close to my stepmother's parents when her and my Dad were still married. I didn't have to refer to them in the third person that often, but when I did I'd always say "step-grandfather?" with audible question mark. It was somewhat awkward.

It's even weirder now that my Dad is no longer married. My former stepmother's neice still babysits for our son, so we're always like, "my former step-cousin?" We just call her a family friend.

Genealogists, OTOH, probably only really care about biological relationships. That is, if someone is doing up their family tree in 100+ years, they probably won't be too concerned with step-parents. Although, we still have paintings done by my great-great-step-grandmother (that is, my great-great-grandfather's second wife), so who knows?
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  #263  
Old 07 January 2018, 10:31 PM
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The man I called Grandfather all my life was not my biological grandfather. He came into the picture not long after my mother was born. But, when I was researching my ancestry recently, I followed my biological grandfather as I was interested in my ethnic makeup. That said, if I were to be following my cultural heritage I would have gone the other way.
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  #264  
Old 07 January 2018, 10:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beachlife! View Post
2. Siblings would not be considered related, his kids would technically be step-cousins, though I think most people would just call them cousins. That's just a guess on my part.
I think of them as second cousins, but I don't think that's technically correct. But it's easier than saying "My dad's brother-in-law's nieces and nephews."

We often refer to my uncle's family collectively as The California Crew, since they all live there and he and the rest of us live in Florida.
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  #265  
Old 07 January 2018, 11:29 PM
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My mom always called her stepmother by her first name, but when speaking of her in the third person, she'd say "my mother." I get the feeling she and her bio mom had a prickly relationship, and then her stepmother was around for all the big stuff in most of my Mom's adult life, good and bad.
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  #266  
Old 07 January 2018, 11:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard W View Post
Yes, basically for the reasons in Lainie's article about kidney beans. Maybe it depends on the type of bean. Or maybe it's nonsense for kidney beans, too. But once you've heard that idea about one sort of bean and you can't quite remember which, probably people are going to want to play it safe...
I have a relative from China who was shocked to discover that I eat raw snap beans (I would say green beans, but they also come in purple, yellow, and spotted.) She was entirely certain that they were toxic unless cooked.

I googled it quite a bit at the time and could only find references to toxins in some dry beans -- I don't think it was only kidneys, but can't find the reference.

Some people can't eat fava beans, but I think that's an allergy or sensitivity, not a component toxic to everybody.
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  #267  
Old 08 January 2018, 12:54 AM
RichardM RichardM is offline
 
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Ah ha! Vegetables are poisonous. Hence I don't need to eat them.
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  #268  
Old 08 January 2018, 01:25 AM
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Originally Posted by Cervus View Post
2. I have an uncle-by-marriage (in other words, he isn't a blood relative.) What relationship, if any, are his siblings and their children to me?
I think your uncle's siblings, and their kids, are not related to you at all. They are more just people you might see at a party sometimes. It is the same relationship I have to my brother-in-laws siblings: they are my sister's inlaws, but for me, we know each other from being at family parties but that is pretty much it.
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  #269  
Old 08 January 2018, 02:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thorny locust View Post
I have a relative from China who was shocked to discover that I eat raw snap beans (I would say green beans, but they also come in purple, yellow, and spotted.) She was entirely certain that they were toxic unless cooked.

I googled it quite a bit at the time and could only find references to toxins in some dry beans -- I don't think it was only kidneys, but can't find the reference.

Some people can't eat fava beans, but I think that's an allergy or sensitivity, not a component toxic to everybody.
Red kidney beans are especially high in the toxin phytohaemagglutinin, white kidney beans have a fraction of that amount and it's present in many other varieties of beans.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phaseo...garis#Toxicity
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  #270  
Old 08 January 2018, 02:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WildaBeast View Post
Since we're on the subject, is my dad's stepfather my grandfather, from a genealogical perspective? I always thought of him as my grandfather, in fact he was more of a grandfather to me than my "biological" grandfather. He and my grandmother were the ones we visited when I was a kid, while I never actually met my biological grandfather. But would a genealogist call him my grandfather?

Along the same lines, is my dad's stepbrother my uncle?
If he’s been around more than your biological grandfather, then for all intents and purposes, he’s your grandfather. Blood is not the sole factor that determines what makes up a family. I suppose you can learn about your biological grandfather if you’re curious and maybe from a more scientific perspective, your dad’s stepdad is technically not biologically related to you, but again, it takes more than blood to make a family.

Though genealogy seems less a science and more about history, closer to an art form in that often you make your best guesses based on what’s available and there may be large gaps in the record for whatever reason, that may not ever be filled. So genealogy may operate in a different manner than science.

I apologize if in the first paragraph, I was needlessly hectoring, but the “adoptive parents aren’t your real parents” and “someone only counts as a relation if you share blood” memes is on of those memes that cheeses me off and causes me to leap out of the gate all ranty. And we know how normally calm and reticent I usually am regarding subjects I feel passionate about.
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  #271  
Old 08 January 2018, 03:41 AM
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Originally Posted by Lainie View Post
Kidney beans require some care (which is why I never buy them dried).
Wow. I did not know that about beans. This is one of those things they should teach in school before debating whether to teach cursive.

About soaking and eliminating the water, it still seems equivocal since it's the cooking that breaks down those toxins. At least now I know what we're trying tor remove! Thank you.
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  #272  
Old 08 January 2018, 12:28 PM
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You're welcome. I had no idea until a couple years ago; it had been just luck that I'd never bought the dried ones. Now I deliberately avoid them.
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  #273  
Old 08 January 2018, 02:14 PM
Sooeygun Sooeygun is offline
 
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Growing up my parents grew their own kidney beans and dried them. My mom never soaked them before cooking, although they were definitely fully cooked.

I won't cook dried kidney beans in my kitchen because I can't stand the smell (and for the recipes I am using them for there's no need to use dried). I used to hate that part of my mom's chili making. They stink when they are boiling more than any other bean (maybe it's the phytohaemagglutinin that makes the smell).
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  #274  
Old 08 January 2018, 02:33 PM
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Seaboe Muffinchucker Seaboe Muffinchucker is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Esprise Me View Post
At least one vegetarian cookbook I own says to soak beans and discard the water before boiling to make the end result less farty,
I read that as to make them less fatty and for a moment, couldn't understand where they'd've gotten the idea that those beans were fatty.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cervus View Post
I think of them as second cousins, but I don't think that's technically correct.
Cousin level is determined by counting backward to the ancestor(s) you have in common. Your first cousins have one generation (your parents) and you have your grandparents in common. Second cousins would be the children of first cousins (they have you and your parents between them and the ancestors in common).

Since you and the children of your first cousins are not on the same generational level (even if you're the same age), those people are your first cousins once removed. The children of your second cousins are your second cousins once removed.

The grandchildren of your first cousins would be your first cousins twice removed. Increasing the number of removals does not change the first- second- third- cousin dynamic.

Because of how complicated the above quickly becomes for those in large families, most people don't specify, and simply say "cousin". ETA: It doesn't help that English doesn't have specific terms to delineate the relationships.

In my case, my mother came from a small family descended from two large families, while my father came from a large family with a wide age spread (my grandmother's first child was born in 1913, and her last in 1930). I basically grew up knowing the cousin stuff.

Seaboe

Last edited by Seaboe Muffinchucker; 08 January 2018 at 02:35 PM. Reason: English as a funny language
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  #275  
Old 08 January 2018, 02:52 PM
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It occurs to me that I've also been told that edamame (green stage soybeans) are toxic unless cooked; though you don't have to cook them very long. I don't know whether that's true. I've eaten an occasional raw edamame with no ill effects, checking for ripeness and flavor in the field, but never more than two or three at a time. I do tell customers to cook them.
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  #276  
Old 08 January 2018, 05:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thorny locust View Post
Some people can't eat fava beans, but I think that's an allergy or sensitivity, not a component toxic to everybody.
Favism is caused by the lack of an enzyme that breaks down a fava bean toxin. If you don't produce it, eating fava beans causes hemolytic anemia. (Your circulating red blood cells break down.) Adults usually become ill but recover. Children often die. In parts of Italy where fava beans are a staple, children may be tested for the enzyme. The condition is pretty rare, and is not tested for here.

Here's an interesting article about the question of whether to publicise the risk. It touches a little on issues raised in this discussion -- the warning gets only vaguely remembered, garbled, or misremembered, and people will wind up avoiding all beans, or thinking that cooked favas are safe for all, but raw ones are dangerous to all, etc.

http://www.post-gazette.com/life/foo...s/200510100220
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  #277  
Old 09 January 2018, 03:44 AM
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Originally Posted by WildaBeast View Post
Since we're on the subject, is my dad's stepfather my grandfather, from a genealogical perspective?...
My Genealogy program says that my grandmother's husband (not my grandfather) is my grandmother's husband. I consider him my grandfather, as I never met my dad's father, but we always called him by his name. Strictly from a genealogy perspective, it matters if someone is related by blood or not, as that follows the family line, but as someone who never knew her mom well and didn't feel anything when she died, ymmv.
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  #278  
Old 09 January 2018, 10:26 AM
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I've also just remembered that "fava bean" is another name for broad bean, one of the other types of bean (apart from kidney beans) that we would have eaten a lot when I was growing up. (And one of the few vegetables I've never really liked).

So if two out of three beans that we ate were potentially toxic under certain circumstances, and the third grew in the garden and was eaten together with the pods, it's not surprising that I thought all dried beans were potentially toxic!
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  #279  
Old 09 January 2018, 11:23 AM
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Erwins, that is not entirely true. Favism, aka g6pd deficiency, is extremely common in African Americans and therefore we have a very high rate here in Philadelphia. Males with it still produce some enzyme and do not often die, they will have a transient anemia. Females have a second X chromosome which makes more than enough enzyme and therefore they have no symptoms usually. G6pd is on our newborn screen here so many parents know about it.
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  #280  
Old 09 January 2018, 08:14 PM
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Thanks for the information, sneeze042.
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