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  #241  
Old 05 January 2018, 08:48 PM
Sooeygun Sooeygun is offline
 
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Types of Youtube advertising

Non-skippable ads (CPM = cost per thousand views, I think)
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  #242  
Old 05 January 2018, 09:03 PM
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WildaBeast WildaBeast is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GenYus234 View Post
The chart says they were common from the 50's to 70's, not solely used in that time period. With the huge number of car models, it would be almost impossible to definitively say when a handle was no longer used (except when that style was no longer allowed by regulations).
Fair enough. I will comment on one other thing from the article, though:

Quote:
Iím also unsure if anyone other than Honda used the Class 6 squeeze handles
Yes. The 1979 Toyota my dad had when I was a kid had Class 6 handles. Perhaps I should mention that in the comments section of the article.

This discussion makes me realize that every cay I've owned has had a different type of door handle. The Buick I already mentioned had Class 3 (technically my parents owned that car, but I drove it), my old Saturn had Class 7, and my current car has Class 11.
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  #243  
Old 05 January 2018, 09:21 PM
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GenYus234 GenYus234 is offline
 
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Makes sense, Japanese auto makers seem to share a lot of minor body bits. For example, my friends 2004 Nissan pickup has the exact same heater/air conditioning panel as my 2001 Toyota pickup.
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  #244  
Old 05 January 2018, 09:57 PM
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Lainie Lainie is offline
 
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The terrible squeeze handles I dealt with were all on Toyotas.
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  #245  
Old 06 January 2018, 12:54 AM
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Beachlife! Beachlife! is offline
 
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My Toyotas have all had Class 7, Pull ups, as does my Jag. I'm not sure what a Squeeze is. What gets squeezed?
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  #246  
Old 06 January 2018, 01:06 AM
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WildaBeast WildaBeast is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Beachlife! View Post
My Toyotas have all had Class 7, Pull ups, as does my Jag. I'm not sure what a Squeeze is. What gets squeezed?
Look at the door handles on this old Civic. You stick your fingers under that metal cover and there's a latch that you squeeze between your fingers and that cover. Looking at pictures on Wikipedia it looks like both Toyota and Honda switched to the "Class 7" handles around the mid 1980s (at least on the Corolla and Civic; I didn't look at other models but I would imagine they switched whenever a model got redesigned).
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  #247  
Old 06 January 2018, 01:13 AM
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thorny locust thorny locust is offline
 
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I really wish they'd standardize the things; at least, on the inside. Groping around trying to figure out how to get out of somebody else's car is usually just annoying, but occasionally it's a safety issue.
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  #248  
Old 07 January 2018, 10:22 AM
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ganzfeld ganzfeld is offline
 
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If you soak beans for a long time before cooking them, do you get rid of the water or just cook them in the same water? (I've always used the same water but I don't know if that's 'correct'. Maybe it depends on the kind of bean?)
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  #249  
Old 07 January 2018, 11:19 AM
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Richard W Richard W is offline
 
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I get rid of the water, on the grounds that it contains whatever it was that I was trying to soak out of the beans, and so I'd rather it didn't end up in the finished result.

Not necessarily a terribly logical reason either, given it would be a lot more dilute and you'd only get the small amounts that ended up on the surface of the beans, which would probably be less than the amount left in them anyway, but if you boil them for a long time too then you could conceivably reduce the liquid enough that the concentrations increased again to levels you wouldn't want (for whatever reason).

(eta) I guess this depends on the assumption that you're soaking the beans to get rid of something, rather than just to hydrate them before boiling, but I'd always understood that to be the reason for soaking them. I've forgotten why I always throw one of them out of the window and stroke the little cow toy, though.
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  #250  
Old 07 January 2018, 02:10 PM
KirkMcD KirkMcD is offline
 
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You're just trying to rehydrate the beans. According to Epicurious, even that might not be necessary.
https://www.epicurious.com/expert-ad...-myths-article


-- Karyn
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  #251  
Old 07 January 2018, 02:32 PM
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ganzfeld ganzfeld is offline
 
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Thank you Richard and Karyn. Actually, it seems I do all the things mentioned as best practice in that Epicurious except the short soak. I'm a long soaker. (But depends a lot on the bean. They were doing pintos and I find they do better with a shorter soak...) I never heard to throw away the soaking water until recently. Granted, it was a long long soak and (OK, maybe the water was a bit smelly too but) it had never occurred to me that's what some people do every time.

I had also still never considered that one reason to soak them is to get rid of something (what?).
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  #252  
Old 07 January 2018, 03:08 PM
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Epicurious left out that cooking and/or soaking time can depend on how old the beans are. I once tried to cook some very old dried beans, and after cooking them on and off for two days gave up and composted them.

I can report on a coincidentally timed experiment, however: I have some dried beans that have been around for several years, but most of that time they've been in the freezer. I threw some of them in a soup pot a couple of days ago, not bothering to soak them first, and they were cooked within an hour or so (and quite good, while we're at it.)

I've heard some people say that they think tossing out the soaking water makes the beans less likely to cause gas. Epicurious didn't test for that, at least not according to that article. Beans don't make me all that gassy anyway so I don't have an opinion on it.

Some things are indeed soaked to get rid of toxins. Some of them need to be not only soaked, but boiled, and the cooking water thrown away. A batch of us found out many years ago that you really do need to do that to milkweed (nobody got seriously ill, but several people were up all night emptying themselves back out. Milkweed tastes much better the first time.)
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  #253  
Old 07 January 2018, 04:25 PM
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Lainie Lainie is offline
 
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Kidney beans require some care (which is why I never buy them dried).
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  #254  
Old 07 January 2018, 05:05 PM
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Richard W Richard W is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ganzfeld View Post
I had also still never considered that one reason to soak them is to get rid of something (what?).
Yes, basically for the reasons in Lainie's article about kidney beans. Maybe it depends on the type of bean. Or maybe it's nonsense for kidney beans, too. But once you've heard that idea about one sort of bean and you can't quite remember which, probably people are going to want to play it safe...
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  #255  
Old 07 January 2018, 06:17 PM
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Esprise Me Esprise Me is offline
 
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At least one vegetarian cookbook I own says to soak beans and discard the water before boiling to make the end result less farty, but it seems that's an urban myth:
http://www.latimes.com/food/dailydis...911-story.html
Quote:
The problem with beans is well documented. At its root are two factors. First, beans are high in fiber, which most Americans don't eat much of and which can cause flatulence. Second, beans contain complex sugars called alpha-galactosides. The human body does not produce enzymes to digest these sugars. Mainly raffinose and stachyose, they pass through the stomach undigested until they reach the large intestine. There they ferment, producing gases -- hydrogen, carbon dioxide and -- in some people -- methane. The rest is faux pas.

It was thought that soaking beans in cold water leached these sugars out of the bean. Throw away the water and you throw away the gas -- it has a simple appeal. Unfortunately, it isn't true. These sugars are part of what the bean uses for nourishment as it grows into a plant, and the bean does not part with them gladly.

"When you soak beans in cold water, the beans are actually still alive and their cell walls are still functional," explains Gray. "Those walls are designed to be a very good barrier -- to take water in, but not to let the seed nutrients out."
[...]
In fact, it seems, the surest cure for flatulence caused by beans is eating more beans.

"Apparently, if you eat beans regularly, the microflora [which ferment the sugars causing gas] adjust somewhat," says Gray. "If you eat bean-and-cheese burritos every day, unless you have some kind of specific problem, you probably won't notice it at all. In cultures that routinely eat beans, you don't hear a lot of complaining about flatulence."
I haven't experimented with soaking vs. not soaking, but I did experience some gas when I first switched to a largely plant-based diet, and it went away within a month once my body adjusted, FWIW.
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  #256  
Old 07 January 2018, 08:39 PM
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I never had the impression that I was doing it to remove something that caused farting. I thought it was an active toxin - as Lainie's article claims about kidney beans. Since kidney beans were one of the more likely sorts of beans that we'd have been eating when I grew up*, I'd have absorbed that information, and then extended it to other kinds of beans to be safe...

*(Those or broad beans, or runner beans which aren't the same because we grew them in the garden and you eat the whole pod).
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  #257  
Old 07 January 2018, 08:50 PM
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Lainie Lainie is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard W View Post
Or maybe it's nonsense for kidney beans, too. But once you've heard that idea about one sort of bean and you can't quite remember which, probably people are going to want to play it safe...
I'm pretty sure it's not nonsense, judging from the results of my Google search.

ETA: Avoiding gas is the only reason I've heard for discarding the soaking water from other beans.
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  #258  
Old 07 January 2018, 09:57 PM
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Cervus Cervus is offline
 
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Some possibly stupid genealogy questions:

1. My mother had a younger brother who died when he was a child, in the 1950's. Is it correct to refer to him as my uncle, even though he never lived long enough to "become" an uncle? I've never had any reason to bring him up in conversation, but for some reason that question popped into my head. It doesn't seem right to refer to him as a uncle, although from a genealogical perspective he is.

2. I have an uncle-by-marriage (in other words, he isn't a blood relative.) What relationship, if any, are his siblings and their children to me?
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  #259  
Old 07 January 2018, 10:01 PM
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Beachlife! Beachlife! is offline
 
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1. Yes, he'd be your uncle. My brother passed before my kids were born, I like to think of him as their uncle they never new. The same way my grand father is their great grand father even though he too passed before they were born.

2. Siblings would not be considered related, his kids would technically be step-cousins, though I think most people would just call them cousins. That's just a guess on my part.
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  #260  
Old 07 January 2018, 10:50 PM
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Lainie Lainie is offline
 
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I agree with Beachlife. My mom's only brother was killed in WWII, and I describe him as my uncle.

ETA: I grew up with some "cousins" who were actually the genetic grandchildren of either my mom's stepmother M, or G, the guy that M married after mom's father died. They were genetically no relation to me or my genetic cousins. For the most part, we just called each other cousins. it was easier.

Last edited by Lainie; 07 January 2018 at 10:56 PM.
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