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  #461  
Old 08 February 2018, 10:13 AM
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Not just President Trump - driving on the left annoys everybody! At least everybody who really counts.


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  #462  
Old 08 February 2018, 01:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Richard W View Post
I can think of a few games where traffic drives on the left - Assassin's Creed: Syndicate (where it's horses and carriages) because that's set in London, and Forza Horizon 3, which is set in Australia, but they certainly don't make left-hand traffic versions of other games just for countries that drive on the left.
What about games set in the Roman Empire?
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  #463  
Old 08 February 2018, 02:25 PM
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In those games there is no standard as to what side you drive on as everyone is Roman all over the road.

Although, navigation in those games is easy as there is only one road-based destination.
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  #464  
Old 08 February 2018, 03:36 PM
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My question is, does right-side v. left-side driving influence how people behave in non-driving situations - specifically, how one moves to avoid colliding with/blocking a pedestrian coming the other way?

I ask because I work in an office with a number of immigrants from India, and I've both observed and participated in "shall we dance" moments in the hallway, often resulting when an American employee steps right and the Indian employee walking the other way steps left.

Then again, I've also seen some American employees step left instead of right, so maybe the step-right thing isn't as ingrained in Americans as I would have thought.
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  #465  
Old 08 February 2018, 04:17 PM
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I seem to recall that walking down a sidewalk (pavement) in the UK or Australia was done on the right.

Escalators in the UK are setup so you are riding on the right, not on the left. This one has a sign telling riders to stand on the right, leaving the left for "passing", just like right-side driving.
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  #466  
Old 08 February 2018, 05:02 PM
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It probably annoys President Trump as well.)
Please continue to annoy the twit. If he gets mad at you, it's okay. You are more sane than Kim Jong Un and don't have a big beautiful nuclear botton.
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  #467  
Old 08 February 2018, 06:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lainie View Post
My question is, does right-side v. left-side driving influence how people behave in non-driving situations...
I can share this: After two weeks in Ireland, where my friend did all the driving, I had trouble adapting to the American way - I would look right-left-right instead of left-right-left when crossing the street, with quite a few close calls. Strangely, this took longer to get over than getting used to the left side rules when I was in Ireland.
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  #468  
Old 08 February 2018, 06:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GenYus234 View Post
I seem to recall that walking down a sidewalk (pavement) in the UK or Australia was done on the right.

Escalators in the UK are setup so you are riding on the right, not on the left. This one has a sign telling riders to stand on the right, leaving the left for "passing", just like right-side driving.
That's the standard for escalators here too (Toronto). Stand Right, Walk Left. At least it was until the transit authority took all the signs down for liability reasons. It's still mostly followed, just not officially.
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  #469  
Old 08 February 2018, 07:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GenYus234 View Post
I seem to recall that walking down a sidewalk (pavement) in the UK or Australia was done on the right.

Escalators in the UK are setup so you are riding on the right, not on the left. This one has a sign telling riders to stand on the right, leaving the left for "passing", just like right-side driving.
On escalators you stand on the right and walk on the left, and on pavements, paths, etc you tend to stay to the left too.
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  #470  
Old 08 February 2018, 08:17 PM
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And Far Cry 4 has you driving on the right even though it's set in a fictional version of Nepal (or Bhutan, or the mountainous parts of India), which drives on the left in reality.
Far Cry 4 is actually what prompted the question, when it (finally, after nearly 2 years of owning the game) occurred to me how odd it was that not only were the vehicles left hand drive, but also that AI drivers behaved as if the country drove on the right.
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  #471  
Old 08 February 2018, 10:50 PM
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In DC, the rule on metro escalators seems to be walkers keep right, brisk walkers keep left. Standers go home.


In LA (yes, we have subways here too), people stand on both sides of the escalator, sometimes right in the middle with one hand on each rail to make absolutely sure nobody can pass. They do this on the down escalators too, even when we can hear the train coming. I think we need a public awareness campaign. Or cattle prods. Cattle prods could work.
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  #472  
Old 09 February 2018, 01:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GenYus234 View Post
I seem to recall that walking down a sidewalk (pavement) in the UK or Australia was done on the right.
We stand on the left of the escalator and leave the right for "over-taking".
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  #473  
Old 09 February 2018, 02:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Esprise Me View Post
In DC, the rule on metro escalators seems to be walkers keep right, brisk walkers keep left. Standers go home.
Didn't we just have a discussion, possibly in some other thread, about how broken escalators couldn't be used routinely as stairs because the difference in tread heights and the sharp edges of escalator merging teeth meant they were too dangerous to walk on when they're not moving?

I'm having trouble reconciling that theory with the apparent actual practice that people can and should routinely walk on them when they are moving.

(I lead a life with very few escalators in it. Stairs, yes. Elevators, sometimes. Ramps, usually an option. Escalators? I can't remember when I was last on one.)
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  #474  
Old 09 February 2018, 05:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thorny locust View Post
I'm having trouble reconciling that theory with the apparent actual practice that people can and should routinely walk on them when they are moving.
Walking up them seems like pretty standard behavior in my experience, at least in high-traffic areas. You see mostly standers at the mall, but people walk up them at the train station during rush hour.

FWIW, I walk up and down an escalator about thirty times each work day, and do so elsewhere when practical. I don't find it particularly difficult (I can't remember the last time I fell on one), but I'm also very used to it.
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  #475  
Old 09 February 2018, 06:46 AM
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I Germany, when there are two escalators next to each other, one going up, one going down, they are set up so that the one going in your direction is on the right. At least the is true for public transport, escalators in department stores are different.

I seem to remember that it was the same in Scotland, but I'm not quite sure. How is the set-up in other left-drivinh countries?
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  #476  
Old 09 February 2018, 03:37 PM
Dr. Dave Dr. Dave is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thorny locust View Post
Didn't we just have a discussion, possibly in some other thread, about how broken escalators couldn't be used routinely as stairs because the difference in tread heights and the sharp edges of escalator merging teeth meant they were too dangerous to walk on when they're not moving?

I'm having trouble reconciling that theory with the apparent actual practice that people can and should routinely walk on them when they are moving.

(
If g-you move at a certain pace relative to the escalator speed, then the rise from step to step that g-you experience is close to that of regular stairs.
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  #477  
Old 09 February 2018, 04:15 PM
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In other words, if you move exactly right, then they're close to as safe as stairs?

But there must be lots of people not moving at exactly the right speed. Plus which, there's still a different step height ratio at the bottom and top of the escalator. I've seen people walk in the middle but not at the ends; but that only works if there's little enough traffic that there can be considerable room between walkers. Otherwise, having people stop walking near the end holds up everybody in the middle; and would certainly make it hard if not impossible for them to keep a steady pace at just the right speed.
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  #478  
Old 09 February 2018, 04:38 PM
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Walking on an escalator is different from walking on stairs. Once you are used to it, it's probably not too much higher degree of difficulty, but it requires more attention, and certain predictive calculations that become ingrained. My kids still need help and/or supervision at age 4 on escalators. They've been able to tackle stairs on their own for ages.

And going back to the stopped escalator question, as people mentioned, part of the issue is that a stopped escalator will have varying step heights. On a moving escalator, you pay close attention at the beginning and end so that you time your strides correctly to the places where steps flatten out or rise up. Treating a stopped escalator as stairs might work temporarily, because people will probably still be attentive to it as an escalator. If people start perceiving it as stairs, I would bet that there would be more problems.
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  #479  
Old 09 February 2018, 05:22 PM
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The BBC's got a little video up at the moment called "Why do the British drive on the left?" but I don't know if it will be visible to you non-license-payers outside the UK:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/uk-engl...ve-on-the-left
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  #480  
Old 09 February 2018, 07:34 PM
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When animals are brought through airport security, how are they screened? Do they have to be taken from their carriers? Would a dog with a vest go through the metal detector and then be patted down?
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