snopes.com  

Go Back   snopes.com > Non-UL Chat > The Bad Gastronomer

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old 07 October 2014, 02:29 AM
crocoduck_hunter's Avatar
crocoduck_hunter crocoduck_hunter is offline
 
Join Date: 27 May 2009
Location: Roseburg, OR
Posts: 13,138
Default

It's Troberg, who I don't think I've seen around here for a while now.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 07 October 2014, 02:39 AM
erwins's Avatar
erwins erwins is offline
 
Join Date: 04 April 2006
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 12,366
Default

Also Floater and sjö.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 07 October 2014, 04:51 AM
Die Capacitrix's Avatar
Die Capacitrix Die Capacitrix is offline
 
Join Date: 03 January 2005
Location: Kanton Luzern, Switzerland
Posts: 3,352
Default

Anyway, I'm American, so what a local might want (or be interested in try) is probably going to be different.

For example, I really miss York Peppermint Patties (which is why I have 4 bags in the cellar), and I've been told by people here that After Eight is equivalent (many think they are disgusting as mint and chocolate are an uncommon mix). Nope. Not even close.

And if someone is traveling my way and ask what we might want? Snyder's Sourdough Pretzels, Taskykake krimpets and real vanilla extract.

Another suggestion - a good brownie mix. There are brownie mixes here, but they are nowhere as good as Ghirardelli Premium Chocolate (had some of those during one of our visits back to the states - wow).

We've been here 14 years and now we can find muffin mixes, and other cake mixes, but they are not as good (decadent) as the ones in the U.S. They are fairly utilitarian.

If your friend likes hot sauce, there are a number of ones which are easy to find in the U.S., but difficult to find here. We can get basic Tabasco, but none of the special ones. But then Switzerland has a very small market, so not much variety.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 07 October 2014, 01:56 PM
Lainie's Avatar
Lainie Lainie is offline
 
Join Date: 29 August 2005
Location: Suburban Columbus, OH
Posts: 74,585
Default

Die Capacitrix, for my 17th birthday, my dear friend Jane made me a batch of homemade peppermint patties. They were amazing. I don't think I've had a better birthday present since.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 07 October 2014, 02:20 PM
Troberg Troberg is offline
 
 
Join Date: 04 November 2005
Location: Borlänge, Sweden
Posts: 11,580
Default

Quote:
Right now I plan to send some candy corn/pumpkins (since it's Halloween), some small packets of ranch dressing/dip mix, taco seasoning, and individual-sized pouches of Peanut Butter & Co. Dark Chocolate Dreams and almond butter (regular, vanilla, and maple).

I turn now to you. I am pondering chili mix and corn muffin mix, grits, taco shells, and tortillas. What's a good, American-but-not-exported-to-Sweden, portable sort of thing to ship?
Things readily available in Sweden:

* Ranch dressing/dip
* All taco stuff
* Peanut butter
* Chili mix
* Pulled pork/beef
* Just about anything BBQ related
* Just about any spices or mixes of spices
* Syrup

What's harder to get:

* Cajun stuff
* Beef jerky
* Chocolate dipped potato chips
* Jello

I'm no expert on American food, so this is what I can think of. It would have been easier if it was the other way around, then we'd have such Swedish delicacies as:

* Swedish kaviar. Can be found at IKEA, nothing like russian kaviar, used on sandwiches. Just spread it, like you would do with peanut butter.

* Pickled herring. The less said about this, the better. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pickled_herring

* Knäckebröd. A kind of hard bread. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crispbread

* Brunkål. A bit like a sweet&sour sauerkraut. http://sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brunk%C3%A5l

* The kebab and fries pizza. Seriously, we've taken the pizza concept and mixed it up with just about every other food culture, then put it on steroids and supercharged it. https://www.google.se/search?q=kebab...g&ved=0CB8QsAQ

* Falukorv. If you've seen the classic Swedish porn movie Fäbojäntan, you've seen one of these put in an orifice not usually used for ingesting them. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Falukorv

* Gustavskorv. Smoked horse sausage. A bit like Medwurst, although smokier and drier.

* Spittekaka. A bit like marengue, but made with the yolks instead. Generally regarded as the food of the gods. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spettekaka

* Fermented herring. Not recommended, don't even open the can. Especially not indoors. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surstr%C3%B6mming

* Salmiak. A licorice-y candy, but with a very distinct taste. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salty_liquorice (read the first paragraph in this article, about it being an aquired taste!)

* Salt candy. For some reason, most countries only have sweet candy, but we have it in salt and sour as well.

* Tunnbrödsrulle. A roll of thin bread, with mashed potatoes and meat, often reindeer meat or a hot dog. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tunnbr%C3%B6d

* The Swedish beer. We have hundreds of tiny breweries, and they really live for their work, so they are good. Go to a pub in Sweden, and it's not uncommon to have 50-100 kinds of beer to choose from.

* Hembränt. The traditional, homemade vodka, preferably served from a plastic can. Slightly illegal...

* Pyttipanna. Usually made from leftovers, with meat and potato cut into tiny cubes and fried with some unions. Often eaten with eggs and pickled beetroots, or, for the kids, ketchup. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyttipanna

* Swedish meatballs. Actually, they are not very Swedish, lots of variants exist all over the world.

* Coffee. Yeah, I know you think you have coffee in America as well. Well, you don't. You have tea with coffee flavour. We have the real stuff, black as tar, hot as hell and so strong it's like dropping a nuke in the stomach. Our coffee isn't some café latte hipster, coffee that isn't afraid to roll up the sleeves and get dirty.

* Tjälknul. A salted moose steak that is slowly cooked over a long time, starting out frozen, to make it tender and tasty. http://sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tj%C3%A4lkn%C3%B6l

* Smörgåstårta. Like a cake sized deluxe sandwich, with several layers of goodness, often including cheese, shrimp, ham, caviar, mayo and other tasty stuff. Eaten pretty much at the same occasions one would eat a cake. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sm%C3%B...%A5st%C3%A5rta , http://sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sm%C3%B...%A5st%C3%A5rta


Quote:
Originally Posted by A Turtle Named Mack View Post
Troberg (and waffles)
You called! I've been otherwise occupied for a while, and will be for a while more, but I still check in occasionally.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 07 October 2014, 07:43 PM
Sjö Sjö is offline
 
Join Date: 16 August 2009
Location: Göteborg, Sweden
Posts: 127
Default

Tacos are popular here and they're easy to find. Besides Old el Paso we have our own brand, so I don't think you should send that. Problem is, I know what we have here, but I don't really recall what's special in the US that you might want to send. I think what has been mentioned in the thread are good ideas, and i especially like the idea of Girl Scout cookies. If your friend has seen them on TV or in a movie I think he/she will enjoy trying them for real.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 07 October 2014, 11:45 PM
Avril's Avatar
Avril Avril is offline
 
Join Date: 07 August 2002
Location: Princeton, NJ
Posts: 10,547
Default

I'd get Girl Scout cookies if I could, but you can't just go buy Girl Scout cookies. You have to get them in whatever the season for your area is. (August, for me.)

Although I do have several other things in the box, I decided to err on the side of Halloween candy in non-chocolate versions, like pumpkin Peeps, candy corn, etc. And moon pies, because they were there. This, along with the salt water taffy, and the snap pea crisps, and ranch dressing mix, should include at least some things that are hits as well as misses, I hope.

Now if I could only find a small bag of mellowcreme pumpkins, I'd be set.
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 08 October 2014, 12:33 AM
Beachlife!'s Avatar
Beachlife! Beachlife! is offline
 
Join Date: 22 June 2001
Location: Lansing, MI
Posts: 28,667
Default

Moon pies, good choice!
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 08 October 2014, 01:50 AM
Errata's Avatar
Errata Errata is offline
 
Join Date: 02 August 2005
Location: Santa Barbara, CA
Posts: 13,201
Default

I haven't been to Scandinavia, nor do I have a photographic memory of the grocery stores I've been in elsewhere in Europe, so I'm just listing some foods that I think may be more distinctly American:

grits
real maple syrup
pancake mix
pop tarts
bizarre children's breakfast cereals, miniature variety pack
Rice Krispies treats
can of pumpkin pie filling
root beer
BBQ sauce
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 08 October 2014, 01:56 AM
Avril's Avatar
Avril Avril is offline
 
Join Date: 07 August 2002
Location: Princeton, NJ
Posts: 10,547
Default

Grits are distinctly American. They're also nearly impossible to get in New Jersey!

I think they do have maple syrup, pancake mix, pop tarts, and BBQ sauce. There is an individually-wrapped Rice Crispies treat I bought from a convenience store in the box, though!
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old 08 October 2014, 02:17 AM
crocoduck_hunter's Avatar
crocoduck_hunter crocoduck_hunter is offline
 
Join Date: 27 May 2009
Location: Roseburg, OR
Posts: 13,138
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Avril View Post
Grits are distinctly American. They're also nearly impossible to get in New Jersey!
Not true! There was an old hotel called the Chalfonte Hadenhall in Cape May that I stayed in as a kid that served grits for breakfast (actually, they did the whole Southern breakfast experience).
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 08 October 2014, 04:40 AM
Die Capacitrix's Avatar
Die Capacitrix Die Capacitrix is offline
 
Join Date: 03 January 2005
Location: Kanton Luzern, Switzerland
Posts: 3,352
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Avril View Post
like pumpkin Peeps
I came back to this thread just to suggest that. Marshmallow products are relatively unusual and Peeps are even more so. Even the American candy store chain here in Switzerland rarely has any. And the American style celebration of Halloween is comparatively extreme.

A few comments in Bold
Quote:
Originally Posted by Errata View Post
grits Very much so. I grew up in the U.S. and I don't think I've ever had them.
real maple syrup Easy to find here.
pancake mix Seen it, but not so common. Same shelf as brownie and cake mixes.
pop tarts Very rare, and normally they are the ones from the UK, and they don't have the special flavors.
bizarre children's breakfast cereals, miniature variety pack Especially anything with tons of artificial colors, most of which are banned on this side of the pond.
Rice Krispies treats I think I've seen them, but not certain. I would never buy them because I think the "fresh made" are much better.
can of pumpkin pie filling Canned pumpkin is findable, but I've never seen pumpkin pie filling outside of store selling U.S. products.
root beer More common than it used to be, but still pretty rare.
BBQ sauce Jack Daniels has become extremely common here in the last few years.
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 08 October 2014, 01:03 PM
overyonder overyonder is offline
 
Join Date: 03 March 2010
Location: Charlotte, NC
Posts: 2,127
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by crocoduck_hunter View Post
Not true! There was an old hotel called the Chalfonte Hadenhall in Cape May that I stayed in as a kid that served grits for breakfast (actually, they did the whole Southern breakfast experience).
I'm not too sure I'd want to inflict a Swedish friend with the gawd-awful taste of grits. [my opinion].

OY
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 08 October 2014, 02:33 PM
Seaboe Muffinchucker's Avatar
Seaboe Muffinchucker Seaboe Muffinchucker is offline
 
Join Date: 30 June 2005
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 19,028
Glasses

Quote:
Originally Posted by overyonder View Post
... the gawd-awful taste of grits. [my opinion].
You think lye soaked corn doesn't taste good? I can't imagine why it wouldn't.

Seaboe
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 08 October 2014, 02:48 PM
erwins's Avatar
erwins erwins is offline
 
Join Date: 04 April 2006
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 12,366
Default

Why wouldn't people who eat lye soaked fish like lye soaked corn?
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 08 October 2014, 02:49 PM
Miss Cellaneous's Avatar
Miss Cellaneous Miss Cellaneous is offline
 
Join Date: 26 February 2008
Location: Newport, NC
Posts: 223
Default

I think the problem some people have with grits is that they think of them as a "sweet" and add sugar, cinnamon, or whatever. IME they work best as a "savory" - especially good with cheese melted in, or poached eggs on top. (Never could work up a taste for red-eye gravy, though!)

Of course, down here (and in some places, historically) there's a lot more mixing of savory and sweet - meet with fruit sauces, for instance.

Avril, what about biscuit mix? I have a vague and ill-formed notion that although yeast products are common around the world, biscuits may be somewhat rarer. But I amy be misled on that score.
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 08 October 2014, 05:13 PM
overyonder overyonder is offline
 
Join Date: 03 March 2010
Location: Charlotte, NC
Posts: 2,127
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Miss Cellaneous View Post
I think the problem some people have with grits is that they think of them as a "sweet" and add sugar, cinnamon, or whatever. IME they work best as a "savory" - especially good with cheese melted in, or poached eggs on top. (Never could work up a taste for red-eye gravy, though!)
The lack of flavor (or "odd" flavor) along with the consistency of wallpaper paste kills it completely for me.

OY
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 08 October 2014, 10:27 PM
Horse Chestnut's Avatar
Horse Chestnut Horse Chestnut is offline
 
Join Date: 11 August 2004
Location: Columbus, OH
Posts: 5,307
Default

Since it has been mentioned twice that maple syrup is available in Sweden, and knowing how expensive it is even in the states that produce it, got me to wondering if the Sugar Maple tree grows in Europe, or have trees been imported to Northern Europe so it can be processed locally? I can't imagine how much it would cost if it was shipped overseas for sale. Probably about as much as good caviar is here.
Quote:
Originally Posted by overyonder View Post
I'm not too sure I'd want to inflict a Swedish friend with the gawd-awful taste of grits. [my opinion].

OY
Would you like it better if we called it Polenta?

Last edited by Horse Chestnut; 08 October 2014 at 10:34 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 08 October 2014, 10:40 PM
Errata's Avatar
Errata Errata is offline
 
Join Date: 02 August 2005
Location: Santa Barbara, CA
Posts: 13,201
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Horse Chestnut View Post
Since it has been mentioned twice that maple syrup is available in Sweden, and knowing how expensive it is even in the states that produce it, got me to wondering if the Sugar Maple tree grows in Europe, or have trees been imported to Northern Europe so it can be processed locally?
Europe imports maple syrup from North America. And yes, it's not a cheap product. But it's not that expensive when you consider how calorie dense a food it is. A little goes a long way, and $15 will get you a whole pint of it. It's only expensive when you stack it up against the bad imitation stuff made of corn syrup, not when you compare it to food in general.

The small size and high value density just means international shipping in bulk is cost effective and doesn't necessarily add that much to the price, though tariffs and other economic factors might.
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 08 October 2014, 11:50 PM
GaryM's Avatar
GaryM GaryM is offline
 
Join Date: 08 July 2011
Location: Dundee, UK
Posts: 752
Default

The high price of maple syrup in Europe was a "little thing that annoyed me" last year - http://message.snopes.com/showpost.p...&postcount=777
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The Eye of Sauron Appears Over Sweden A Turtle Named Mack Fauxtography 4 01 May 2014 09:21 AM
Sweden's Ice Hotel told to get fire alarms Floater Weird News 28 15 November 2013 09:47 PM
Skippy was banned in Sweden? Skeptic Entertainment 14 20 April 2013 12:45 PM
Sweden to stop sex change sterilization Steve Soapbox Derby 0 11 January 2013 07:10 PM
American ethnic food section nonnieyrissa Fauxtography 146 20 July 2010 01:26 AM


All times are GMT. The time now is 12:13 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.