snopes.com  

Go Back   snopes.com > Non-UL Chat > The Bad Gastronomer

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old 22 August 2013, 07:52 PM
Mad Jay's Avatar
Mad Jay Mad Jay is offline
 
Join Date: 19 July 2003
Location: Virginia
Posts: 13,464
Default

If you like Indian curries, you can try Pav Bhaji Baiscally it;s a potato based gravy with spices and very finely cut vegetables all mixed in. The idea is that you mask the vegetables with the spice. You can put almost any vegetable into it. If you can mash it or cut it into a million pieces, it goes into the pav bhaji. Cauliflower goes great in it, because it provides a earthy taste to the dish, and also complements the spices

I normally don't eat cauliflower, but when I do, it's Pav Bhaji

Mad "Do Pav" Jay
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 22 August 2013, 08:42 PM
Moku's Avatar
Moku Moku is offline
 
Join Date: 19 October 2008
Location: Nowheresville UK
Posts: 1,421
Default

I was looking for Pav bhaji masala today, unfortunately Inverness doesn't really have the sort of shops that might sell it. Looks like I have to shop online.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 22 August 2013, 08:57 PM
Xia's Avatar
Xia Xia is offline
 
Join Date: 20 July 2000
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 4,385
Default

Thanks, those are good tips so far! If anyone has any specific recipes I'd love those too.
I don't actually like any veggies in my eggs/omelettes, I generally just put in cheese or maybe some ham (I know, real healthy). I also never liked veggies on sandwiches although lately I've been ok with a little romaine or something on certain types of sandwiches. I tend to be one to keep my food separate on the plate, and if I'm eating a soup or casserole I pick up the different ingredients separately on the fork/spoon, or in certain combinations.
I actually have tomatoes growing in the garden right now. It's very true about their bing a huge difference between homegrown vs store bought. I found I do like bruschetta with tomatoes from the garden even though I don't usually eat tomatoes otherwise. Unfortunately I planted really late so nothing is ripe yet.

I've also been trying to add mushrooms to my diet, because I've read good things regarding health benefits. I don't like the texture or really the taste either but I can do ok if they are very small pieces and disguised by other flavors.

That's a good idea about the fruit, I am definitely more likely to grab something as a snack if it's in plain sight.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 22 August 2013, 10:54 PM
Moku's Avatar
Moku Moku is offline
 
Join Date: 19 October 2008
Location: Nowheresville UK
Posts: 1,421
Default

I didn't like mushrooms for a long time, though I loved cream of mushroom soup so I kept trying until one day I liked the taste more than I hated the texture. Soup is a good way to go with lots of veg, especially if you can liquidise it to make things less obvious. Go easy on liquidising and juicing though as you can bash the fibre about so much that you lose a lot of its value.
Maybe you could tell us a bit more about what veg you maybe like a bit, at the moment it seems you like very little; perhaps if we can help you get fonder of your present outliers you will feel more positive about getting to grips with other stuff. Variety is pretty important, I think. The more types if veg you *can* eat, the easier including them in your diet becomes.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 22 August 2013, 11:04 PM
Xia's Avatar
Xia Xia is offline
 
Join Date: 20 July 2000
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 4,385
Default

I like broccoli, asparagus, zucchini, cauliflower, artichoke, green beans, snow peas, cucumber, bean sprouts... I think I'm forgetting some.
I sometimes like romaine, carrots, lettuce, pumpkin but it depends on the context/day. I only really like celery stlks when topped with cream cheese and paprika.
I will eat gourd, sometimes shiitake, sweet potato and pickled radish in sushi but not other ways.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 22 August 2013, 11:11 PM
JoeBentley's Avatar
JoeBentley JoeBentley is offline
 
Join Date: 23 June 2002
Location: Jacksonville, FL
Posts: 21,796
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by A Turtle Named Mack View Post
Don't forget popcorn. If it doesn't have the oil and/or butter on it, it is an excellent high-fibre low-cal whole grain food. Seasonings like garlic, onion powder, grated parmesan or romano , etc. can perk it up too.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Jay View Post
Corn is as much a vegetable as potato. Although it's not nutrient-less, for the purposes of having a balanced diet, corn should be counted as a serving of starch, not vegetable.
Yeah but air popped popcorn is great for people that like to snack. It drives me crazy to be watching TV, playing video games or reading without something to snack on and that's an absolutely terrible habit to get into.

But water and air popped popcorn... you'd have to really try to consume enough of that to be a problem. It's pretty nutritionally empty and what it does have, fiber and a little bit of manganese, isn't bad. Of course plain popcorn is a bit of an acquired taste and you can easily ruin it nutritionally by piling on salt and butter, but there's some more healthful flavoring options.

It's also dirt cheap, another plus.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 22 August 2013, 11:18 PM
Moku's Avatar
Moku Moku is offline
 
Join Date: 19 October 2008
Location: Nowheresville UK
Posts: 1,421
Default

Okay, I see pumpkin and sweet potato, would you be okay with butternut squash? People have already mentioned roasting it, but one of the ways I like it best is roasted in small cubed and then stirred into a risotto, it's a lovely autumnal dish so the timing is quite good! (though maybe it doesn't seem like autumn with you yet) There are lots or recipes online for that including this which I think is the one I first used. They do pretty much all have onion, but if you aren't keen you could omit it and still have a pretty flavourful dish. I like to add smoked haddock to it as well, I don't know if you have that or a comparable smoked whitefish.
Do you like any kinds of onions or other alliums? They are so useful in building a depth of flavour, I would be lost without them.

ETA Do you like potatoes? A quick and easy dish I do is a hot potato salad with chopped green beans and herbs. Basically boil about 300-350g potatoes per person until done, plus as many beans as you like. Cut the spuds into chunky pieces and let cool a little. Mix with a load of mayonnaise and chopped chives, parsley or anything else you fancy. This goes really well with smoked Mackerel or bacon grilled and chopped into chunks.

Last edited by Moku; 22 August 2013 at 11:26 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 22 August 2013, 11:40 PM
Dasla's Avatar
Dasla Dasla is offline
 
Join Date: 15 April 2010
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Posts: 3,719
Default

forget it, should read the whole thread.
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 23 August 2013, 12:39 AM
Xia's Avatar
Xia Xia is offline
 
Join Date: 20 July 2000
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 4,385
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xia View Post
I like broccoli, asparagus, zucchini, cauliflower, artichoke, green beans, snow peas, cucumber, bean sprouts... I think I'm forgetting some.
I sometimes like romaine, carrots, lettuce, pumpkin but it depends on the context/day.
Oops, I thought of a few more veggies I do like, but my phone died before I could edit my post. I also like spinach, corn, brussels sprouts, edamame, sometimes eggplant (cooked certain ways). I don't mind raw cabbage or beets when they're cut up as a garnish/add-in but I'm not sure if I'd like them as a main ingredient in a dish. Most types of beans are ok but I hardly ever actually make them myself so I usually only eat them in canned soups. I like peas ok served alone but I don't like them very much when mixed up with other things for some reason.

I don't like onions but I don't mind shallots or chives in dishes if they're finely chopped and well cooked. I actually don't mind onion flavoring either, I like onion soup mix when made into a dip but I have to strain out the bits of onion that are mixed in. I hate the actual onions themselves though, I think it's partly texture and partly taste. I don't mind using onions in a recipe as long as they are in large enough pieces that I can pick them out. I don't tend to use onions or shallots a lot because I have a very strong reaction when cutting them, it feels like I'm being tear-gassed. Oh, and I love garlic.

I would like to try doing more soups. I also have a crock pot I could use for soups/stews although I usually only use it for pot roast which I generally throw some potatoes and carrots in with. The only issue with soups is I need to be careful not to go too high in calories per serving. I have a broccoli cheese soup recipe I love but it is really unhealthy (high in calories, fat, and sodium!)


Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeBentley View Post
But water and air popped popcorn... you'd have to really try to consume enough of that to be a problem. It's pretty nutritionally empty and what it does have, fiber and a little bit of manganese, isn't bad. Of course plain popcorn is a bit of an acquired taste and you can easily ruin it nutritionally by piling on salt and butter, but there's some more healthful flavoring options.
I bought an air-popper recently so I do sometimes have popcorn as a snack although I find it doesn't actually fill me up that well. This can be a problem because if I end up eating two huge bowls full it's not really low-calorie anymore. I don't like butter on my popcorn so that's not an issue, and I've been using a salt substitute or Kernel Seasons white cheddar as a topping.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moku View Post
Okay, I see pumpkin and sweet potato, would you be okay with butternut squash?
I have had butternut squash roasted with honey before and it wasn't bad, not my favorite but I didn't hate it either. I think I'll try out some pumpkin/squash recipes this fall. I mean besides the apple pumpkin bread I usually make, which is delicious but uses tons of butter and is not in any way healthy. I tried spaghetti squash once but the texture was horrible.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Moku View Post
Do you like potatoes? A quick and easy dish I do is a hot potato salad with chopped green beans and herbs. Basically boil about 300-350g potatoes per person until done, plus as many beans as you like. Cut the spuds into chunky pieces and let cool a little. Mix with a load of mayonnaise and chopped chives, parsley or anything else you fancy. This goes really well with smoked Mackerel or bacon grilled and chopped into chunks.
I love potatoes, I could eat potatoes every day. However I normally don't like potato salad though because I don't like cold potatoes or mayonnaise. Now, a warm potato salad with something other than mayo might work.
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 23 August 2013, 01:44 AM
erwins's Avatar
erwins erwins is offline
 
Join Date: 04 April 2006
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 12,366
Default

I hate sweet things on squash--you might want to try it roasted with butter and salt if you didn't like it with honey.*

Trader Joe's has a masala sauce I really like. I take chicken--usually whole thighs--plus chickpeas, a whole bag of spinach, a head of cauliflower cut up, chopped onion, often an eggplant cubed or sometimes potatoes, and then a bit of fruit, like grapes, a can of lychees, or a bit of pineapple, douse it all in two jars of the sauce plus a can of coconut milk, and simmer until everything is cooked through. You get loads of veggies in a serving. It's my own concoction partly inspired by my favorite Thai place's duck curry.

*I'm not saying it's bad or wrong. Obviously it's literally a matter of taste.

ETA: You could totally omit the onion.
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old 23 August 2013, 03:28 AM
kjbrasda's Avatar
kjbrasda kjbrasda is offline
 
Join Date: 16 October 2001
Location: Osseo, WI
Posts: 2,710
Default

I also don't like sweetened squash. I prefer it with butter and garlic.
Lately I've been trying to buy at least one new veggie a week. Farmers Market veggies are definately much better than most grocery store veggies. This summer I've tried radishes, kohlrabi, beets, turnips, um... a few others. I found that often the stronger tasting veggies get much milder and sweeter if roasted. Yesterday I threw kohlrabi in a stew with pork, venison, carrots and onions and my family mistook it for potatoes. The only one I haven't found a way to cook so I like it is beet, although the greens were quite tasty sauteed with garlic. Actually most of those I listed above have greens that can be eaten. Try a new herb or spice on a veggie? Carrots are really good with honey and ginger.
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 23 August 2013, 08:12 AM
Moku's Avatar
Moku Moku is offline
 
Join Date: 19 October 2008
Location: Nowheresville UK
Posts: 1,421
Default

Xia,
Soup really doesn't need to be super high calorie: it doesn't have to have cheese or cream in it. The soups I make are generally stock, vegetables and seasoning. Some are thickened with pulses and some aren't, the thicker ones I tend to count as a meal in themselves, with the addition of some bread on the side.
Also, opinion is pretty much coming back round to animal fats being a healthy thing, and it turns out the evidence base for salt being bad is not robust. So don't be afraid of including them if they make vegetables taste appealing.
The potato salad would probably work with a simple vinaigrette. I think I would use a light olive oil, white wine vinegar and a little mustard.

I haven't tried Gordon Ramsay's brocolli soup, but I saw the show he made it for and it gets good reviews. It's mostly brocolli.
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 23 August 2013, 12:38 PM
erwins's Avatar
erwins erwins is offline
 
Join Date: 04 April 2006
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 12,366
Default

Some of my favorite veggie recipes come from vegetarian cookbooks. I picked up a few from Ross or Marshall's a while back, and have made many Delicious s soups, mains and sides from them. If you ever go to those stores, you might want to browse what they have. Mine aren't anything special, they just have a lot of nice pictures. While I don't normally require books to have pictures () I really like having them in cookbooks because they inspire me to try new things that look delicious.
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 23 August 2013, 02:16 PM
A Turtle Named Mack's Avatar
A Turtle Named Mack A Turtle Named Mack is offline
 
Join Date: 21 June 2007
Location: Marietta, GA
Posts: 21,451
Default

I think this thread is affecting me in disturbing ways - in a dream last night, I was having a prune-avocado smoothie.
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 23 August 2013, 02:22 PM
Seaboe Muffinchucker's Avatar
Seaboe Muffinchucker Seaboe Muffinchucker is online now
 
Join Date: 30 June 2005
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 19,032
Glasses

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xia View Post
I don't like the texture or really the taste either but I can do ok if they are very small pieces and disguised by other flavors.
I'm extremely mushroom averse due, primarily, to the texture. However, my local bistro (now an Ale House, with the same owners) used to have fritters made from cornmeal, finely ground chantrell mushrooms and gruyere cheese, served with a honey-chipotle sauce. They were absolutely marvelous. Grinding the mushrooms into bits so small you couldn't tell them from the cornmeal dealt with the texture issue. Any taste issue would be hidden by the sauce.

Sigh. Now I want fritters.

Seaboe
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 23 August 2013, 02:24 PM
Horse Chestnut's Avatar
Horse Chestnut Horse Chestnut is offline
 
Join Date: 11 August 2004
Location: Columbus, OH
Posts: 5,307
Default

Since squash is on the menu, don't forget spaghetti squash. I'd take a whole squash, poke some slits in it with a knife so it doesn't go all 'splody in the oven, and pop the whole thing in for about 45 minutes at 375-400 degrees. Take out of oven, slice open and gently rake the meat with a fork to loosen the strands. It makes a great substitute for pasta with spaghetti sauce, or just sprinkle with grated cheese and a touch of butter. I've never kept the seeds myself, but I suppose they might be edible themselves if you want to wash and save them, since they are cooked along with the squash meat.
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 27 August 2013, 01:13 AM
Avril's Avatar
Avril Avril is offline
 
Join Date: 07 August 2002
Location: Princeton, NJ
Posts: 10,547
Default

I've been meaning to come back to this thread with a recipe or two I really like. So here you are, from the Fannie Farmer Cookbook.

Carrot Slaw

6 medium carrots
3/4 cup diced celery
1/4 cup diced onions
1/2 cup diced apple
1/3 cup raisins (Note: I leave these out because I hate raisins)
1/2 cup mayonnaise
Salt
Freshly ground pepper

Grate carrots by hand or in a food processor. Toss with the celery, onion, raisins, and apple. Mix in the mayonnaise, season well with salt and pepper, and chill thoroughly.


Cucumber Salad

3 medium cucumbers
Salt
4 tablespoons sour cream or mayonnaise (I use mayo)
3 tablespoons minced scallions
1 teaspoon lemon juice
2 tablespoons vinegar
1/2 teaspoon dry mustard (note: don't think you can substitute prepared mustard for the vinegar and dry mustard; I learned this the hard way--it tastes fine but looks horrible)
1 tablespoon minced dill or parsley (I prefer the dill)

Peel the cucumbers and slice thin. Spread them over the bottom of a colander and sprinkle salt on top. Let them drain for 30 minutes, press gently to remove excess liquid, then chill. Blend the sour cream or mayonnaise, scallions, lemon juice, vinegar, and dry mustard together. Add salt to taste. Toss the dressing with the cucumbers. Sprinkle dill or parsley on top and serve cold.
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 04 September 2013, 04:17 PM
Sister Ray's Avatar
Sister Ray Sister Ray is offline
 
Join Date: 03 July 2000
Location: Columbus, Ohio
Posts: 5,034
Chef

A simple thing for carrots I like is to drizzle them with honey before serving. Not too much, of course, but in small amounts it adds a wonderful sweetness. I second having fruit to snack on; fruits are similar in nutrition to vegetables.

Sister "all I can think of right now" Ray
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 04 September 2013, 04:19 PM
Lainie's Avatar
Lainie Lainie is offline
 
Join Date: 29 August 2005
Location: Suburban Columbus, OH
Posts: 74,585
Default

I've seen carrot slaw done with a vinaigrette, too. The Polish place near my work has it, and it's very tasty.
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 04 September 2013, 06:33 PM
crocoduck_hunter's Avatar
crocoduck_hunter crocoduck_hunter is offline
 
Join Date: 27 May 2009
Location: Roseburg, OR
Posts: 13,148
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Horse Chestnut View Post
Since squash is on the menu, don't forget spaghetti squash. I'd take a whole squash, poke some slits in it with a knife so it doesn't go all 'splody in the oven, and pop the whole thing in for about 45 minutes at 375-400 degrees. Take out of oven, slice open and gently rake the meat with a fork to loosen the strands.
Alternatively, (and this can be used to cook other squash, like acorn or peanut squash) you can bisect them lengthwise and lay them out on an oven tray or, if you're in a hurry, cook them in the microwave.

This might have been suggested already and I just missed it, but have you (the OP) tried hummus? It's quite good as a dip for raw veggies and tends to be healthier than many of the alternatives.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Man named Kim says adding ‘Mr.’ to resume ended job troubles Sue Social Studies 8 18 July 2013 02:27 PM
Adding monsters to thrift store paintings Cervus Fun House 13 22 June 2013 12:32 AM
Good night and good luck, Mr. Gorsky snopes Snopes Spotting 0 16 October 2012 04:59 AM
Einstein only had three good ideas snopes Questionable Quotes 41 23 May 2009 02:08 AM
New fakers find good ideas in old hoaxes snopes Snopes Spotting 0 12 April 2007 05:23 AM


All times are GMT. The time now is 06:45 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.