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  #21  
Old 25 June 2013, 02:57 AM
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I really like the water from my well.

I really dislike most bottled water.
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  #22  
Old 25 June 2013, 05:16 AM
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Originally Posted by Esprise Me View Post
...both the yolk and the albumin are much thicker and stickier; the yolks don't break when they hit the frying pan, and the whites cling to the shell in fat strands like melted mozzarella cheese.
Yikes. I think you just showed me what a city girl I am. That description might have been enough to ensure I never eat an egg that doesn't come from straight from a cold styrofoam box, ever.

I'm kidding...I think. I'm all for happy chickens and buy accordingly, but if 'thick albumin' and 'clingy fat strands' are the hallmarks of farm fresh, I might be fine over here with my Trader Joe's week old free rangers.

Back to the OP, I wonder if only 10% of the judges knew the wines were the same, or only 10% were willing to admit they couldn't taste the difference. The same could go for neighbors anxious to express thankfulness.

Last edited by Little Pink Pill; 25 June 2013 at 05:28 AM.
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  #23  
Old 25 June 2013, 06:43 AM
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Originally Posted by snopes View Post
[...] to see if they notice any difference.
I'm curious if you think you've ever noticed any difference. The results would be interesting even if you did it with willing participants.
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  #24  
Old 25 June 2013, 10:08 AM
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I learned the adage a long time ago... a good bottle of wine is one that you enjoy.

However, I did work with someone who knew wines very, very well, and he opened my eyes to how wines can be used to enhance a dining experience. He knew when the fruity flavoured wines would be better served as opposed to the more acidic dry wines. He could discern the better choices of wine for a meal based upon budget quite well. He was also quite able to explain it to someone who had no experience in it at all.

One thing he was not able to do, because even he has his financial limits, is tell me what makes a $400 bottle of port better than a $25 bottle of port. In his summation, it is rarity, rather than quality.

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  #25  
Old 25 June 2013, 11:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Esprise Me View Post
Yes, and I described the ways in which they were different, to counter snopes's hypothesis that they might be indistinguishable. What does it matter why they are different?
Because if snopes' chickens are fed just enough standard chicken feed to allow them to lay well, and have no access to the outdoors to get more variety in their diet; and if the eggs are two weeks old when the trial is attempted; there won't be any difference. But that wouldn't mean that all eggs are the same, and there's never any difference.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Little Pink Pill View Post
I might be fine over here with my Trader Joe's week old free rangers.
If the yolks break when they hit the pan (as in Esprise Me's example), those eggs are probably a lot more than a week old.
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  #26  
Old 25 June 2013, 11:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Beachlife! View Post
I eat a whole lot of eggs, in a lot of different ways. Usually I get the cheap ones, but everyone once in a while I try organic, brown, brown organic or whatever other fancy eggs they have at the store. The shells do seem thicker and the whites more viscous, but I have never been able to detect any difference in taste.
Whoops, sorry, double post --

If the chickens are raised, as most producing for groceries are, on a large scale; then even if organic, and possibly even if technically "free range", they may be on effectively the same diet as the chickens producing the cheaper eggs: that is, the components of the diet may be organically grown, but they may be an extremely similar mix of grains. Chickens who actually get significant time outdoors on pasture (not on concrete) feed themselves a variable mix of plants and insects.
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  #27  
Old 25 June 2013, 02:22 PM
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While some potent potable tasters may not be able to differentiate, some can. I remember a Mythbusters episode where they were testing to see if running cheap vodka through a water filter (Brita-type pitcher) could make it good vodka. Some cheap vodka they filtered once. Some twice, thrice, etc up to 8 filtrations through 8 brand new filters. Then they had a professional tester try out the resulting vodkas in a double-blind test. He ranked them in exact order from the good stuff, to the most filtered, down to the unfiltered cheap vodka.
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  #28  
Old 25 June 2013, 03:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thorny locust View Post
If the yolks break when they hit the pan (as in Esprise Me's example), those eggs are probably a lot more than a week old.
I've never noticed an issue, but you could be right. I don't know how old they truly are.
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  #29  
Old 25 June 2013, 03:58 PM
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Yolks breaking when they hit the pan wouldn't be an issue for me since I always break them anyway (I only like scrambled eggs). So I guess supermarket eggs of questionable age are good enough for me.
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  #30  
Old 25 June 2013, 05:28 PM
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I think the age and storage thing for eggs is key - I was surprised that in South America, half-dozen cartons of eggs were sold at the cash register, at room temperature.

As for the wine, well, isn't there something to be said for how a person's sense of taste is affected by alcohol? I personally don't like to drink hard liquor before or during a meal, because, literally, my tongue gets drunk. My sense of taste is dulled and I don't enjoy the meal as much. That said, after about 10 or 12 glasses of wine, they would probably all taste the same. Even "Two Buck Chuck" is AWESOME when you're half in the bag.
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  #31  
Old 25 June 2013, 05:33 PM
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We noticed that when we visited England as well. Eggs were kept out on counters rather than in a chiller of some kind. We're so used to refrigerating eggs though that we bought them that way and popped them in the fridge as soon as we got home.
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  #32  
Old 25 June 2013, 05:46 PM
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Quote:
Statistically-apt wine collector Robert Hodgson ran a scientific test on the illustrious judges at the California state fair wine competition, and found that only 10% of judges could tell that they were being given the same exact wine multiple times.
I'd like to know who the "illustrious judges" are, exactly. Are they professional judges, are they certified, or are they run of the mill amateurs?

I've judged at homebrewing competitions (mind you, that's beer, not wine) and there are a number of judges with varying levels of expertise. Some are fabulous judges while others aren't so fabulous. One gent in particular (he's certified and I'm not) could not pick out a chemical aroma & flavor, and it was pretty obvious to me. Since I was the underdog judge, I had to call in the steward to determine which of us was correct. Turns out that the steward agreed with me. ... Just goes to show that some people have different noses for different things.

OY
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  #33  
Old 25 June 2013, 06:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Little Pink Pill View Post
Yikes. I think you just showed me what a city girl I am. That description might have been enough to ensure I never eat an egg that doesn't come from straight from a cold styrofoam box, ever.
Funnily enough, I heard someone, probably on NPR's "StoryCorps" series, talk about how tastes have changed since he was a kid on a farm in the 1940s. He said in those days eggs with dark colored yolks like the ones Esprise Me buys at the farmers' market were considered "country eggs" that only an unsophisticated yokel would eat. People in the cities all wanted milder tasting eggs with light colored yolks. Now foodies seek out the dark yolked eggs that city folks eschewed back in the day.
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  #34  
Old 25 June 2013, 06:40 PM
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One contributor to the fridge/no fridge storage of eggs is that eggs in US and Canada are washed and sanitized. This ends up removing the protective film that helps keep them fresh longer at room temperature.
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  #35  
Old 25 June 2013, 07:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sue View Post
We noticed that when we visited England as well. Eggs were kept out on counters rather than in a chiller of some kind.
Lucas makes refridgerators too.
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  #36  
Old 25 June 2013, 08:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WildaBeast View Post
Now foodies seek out the dark yolked eggs that city folks eschewed back in the day.
It's interesting to watch that tide turn. My 90 year old grandma hates the taste of fresh veggies and insists on canned, because where she grew up that was the only consistent source. My mother will only eat iceberg lettuce in a salad, because other greens are "too strong."
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  #37  
Old 25 June 2013, 08:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GenYus234 View Post
Lucas makes refridgerators too.
Sorry that went right over my head .
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  #38  
Old 25 June 2013, 08:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sue View Post
Sorry that went right over my head .
Lucas' (lack of) reliability in refrigeration (and others?) is legendary.

OY
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  #39  
Old 25 June 2013, 09:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sue View Post
Sorry that went right over my head .
I found this list of Lucas Electric jokes If you scroll down you'll see this one:
Why do the English drink warm beer? Lucas made the refrigerators, too.
So, I assume it's a play on that joke. The Wikipedia article about Lucas Industries states the following:
Quote:
Joseph Lucas, the founder of Lucas Industries was humorously known as the Prince of Darkness in North America, because of the electrical problems common in Lucas-equipped cars, especially British Leyland products. Whether the fault lay with Lucas or British Leyland cost-cutting is open to dispute. As Joseph Lucas died in 1902 and British Leyland was not formed until 1968, some 66 years later, this title is undeserved.
Quote:
Originally Posted by overyonder View Post
Lucas' (lack of) reliability in refrigeration (and others?) is legendary.
Seriously? Prior to this thread I had never heard of Lucas Industries before, let alone jokes about how reliable they were or weren't.

Brian
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  #40  
Old 25 June 2013, 10:31 PM
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That is correct about the origin for the joke. It is legendary amoungst those with British cars from the '60's or '70's for sure. Don't know about the general public though.
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