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  #41  
Old 23 January 2013, 10:57 PM
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Originally Posted by snopes View Post
That's not quite true. The Tea Act did make the price of tea legally imported to the colonies cheaper (by allowing the East India Company to sell directly to the colonies rather than having to go through middlemen, and by increasing the refund of import duties paid to the East India Company), but the Townshend duty on tea imported to the colonies remained in place at its previous level.
Yes, the Townshend duty remained the same, but a result of the lowering of import duties, the price of tea was lower (thus undercutting tea smugglers and effectively increasing the amount, but not the rate, of Townshend duty revenue). The only tax change made in the Tea Act, I believe, was the lowering of that duty.
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  #42  
Old 23 January 2013, 11:38 PM
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Yes, the Townshend duty remained the same, but a result of the lowering of import duties, the price of tea was lower
So it isn't true, as you stated, that "taxes were actually lowered" by the Tea Act. The taxes (i.e., the Townshend duty) remained the same; it was other changes in governmental policy that resulted in lower prices for tea sold in the colonies.

The increased refund of import duties to the East India Company applied to duties on tea imported to Great Britain. Since the Tea Act allowed the East India Company to import tea directly to the colonies rather than first shipping it through Great Britain, the company no longer had to pay those duties on tea sold to colonists.
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  #43  
Old 23 January 2013, 11:47 PM
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It is actually true, since the taxes I was referring as lowered by the Tea Act were those paid by the East India Company due to, as you say, no further need to pay double duty on tea imported through Britain to the colonies. That was the only change in taxes attributable to the Tea Act. Please note that I did not say that the colonists paid lower taxes.
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  #44  
Old 24 January 2013, 02:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Lainie View Post
Commercially, maybe. I find it hard to believe no one in Canada figured out they could pour leftover coffee over ice cubes until about 15 years ago.
*sigh* Yes, commercially. You'll notice I was taking about the successful *marketing* of coffee, and the tone I got from the OP is that it's not the purchase and consumption of "self-brewed" coffee that has grown as much as the consumption of "ready-to-drink" coffee in places like Starbucks and Dunkin Donuts. I'm sure that someone who was well familiar with, and often consumed iced coffee at home, got the idea that they could add product to the menu in the summer and get more sales. But to compete with soda, and to attract a wider (and younger) audience, this was actually an "iced capuccino" - sweetened and diluted with milk - and with a texture more like a 7-11 Slurpee. That's the "commercial" iced coffee I'm talking about. Not what people drink at home. Not even the brewed at the table, super-strong Vietnamese version of iced coffee (served with condensed milk) that I've enjoyed once. It hasn't been around for 50 years. Really.
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  #45  
Old 24 January 2013, 02:57 PM
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I'm not an American, though I can put on a terrible accent and have people throw things at me in embarassment, if that would help. Anyway, I drink an excessive amount of coffee - I usually follow one with another, to fill in the gaps. I hate most pop, though. It's usually too sweet and I don't like the fizziness. I'll make an exception for dandelion and burdock, because that's glorious.

I love the idea of coffee shops and would love to enjoy them more, but I mostly like plain black coffee, and while they offer that it seems a bit odd going to them and ordering the plainest thing there, when I can make that myself at home. I remember about 12 years ago, when it seemed coffee shops were fairly new to find in Manchester, I would spend every lunch time on a Friday in Costa, I was enamoured with the idea of sitting there drinking coffee and eating a pastry product by myself. I don't know why, I was just a bit weird I think, also the nearest tearoom/café smelled of fish from the market.

Is it my imagination or are milkshake parlours becoming popular again? I've seen a number of milkshake places in town, they seem to be doing well.
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  #46  
Old 24 January 2013, 03:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Hero_Mike View Post
I'm sure that someone who was well familiar with, and often consumed iced coffee at home, got the idea that they could add product to the menu in the summer and get more sales. But to compete with soda, and to attract a wider (and younger) audience, this was actually an "iced capuccino" - sweetened and diluted with milk - and with a texture more like a 7-11 Slurpee. That's the "commercial" iced coffee I'm talking about. Not what people drink at home.
I first noticed this in hmmm, late 90s/early 2000s? With Iced Caps at Tim Horton's. One of my sister's introduced me to this terming it "liquid heaven". If there were drinks like this available prior to that I certainly wasn't aware of them.

And it was definitely with the popularity of Starbucks that I noticed more and more young people getting into coffee related beverages. Kids who would have gone to McDonalds for a pop of some kind were now going to Starbucks for a grande blah de blah low foam blah blah soy milk latte.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lainie View Post
Commercially, maybe. I find it hard to believe no one in Canada figured out they could pour leftover coffee over ice cubes until about 15 years ago.
You overestimate us - yes in the privacy of their own home I'm sure some Canadians had figured this out but commercially it took Starbucks to introduce many Canadians to the concept of unsweetened ice tea made with real tea. Most restaurants even now are still serving that sweetened nestea bilge. It's only Starbucks and similar coffee shops who've got it right. Contrast that with restaurants I've been to in the States where iced tea (made with real tea) isn't just on the menu it's offered as an endless refill with people coming to your table with pitchers of the stuff. If we're this backward about iced tea why would you think we'd be any better about iced coffee? We are a little slow as the Simpsons will tell you.

Last edited by Sue; 24 January 2013 at 03:55 PM.
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